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Tag Archives: Mike Heffernan

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 22nd JUNE 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS

•    AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
•    JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN
•    WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)
•    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)
•    FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   
•    OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE
•    TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE
•    COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE
•    ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS
•    ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
D.W. Livingstone (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-44260-050-8
Paperback $32.95 US & CDN

“Education and Jobs is a profound contribution to our understanding of modern economies and education systems. Edited by one of the world’s leading educational sociologists, based on national survey data and close-focus case studies, this book makes a powerful case for new policy, industrial, and educational thinking.” – Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney

The Education-Job Requirement Matching (EJRM) Research Project team, including M. Lordan, S. Officer, K.V. Pankhurst, M. Radsma, M. Raykov, J. Weststar, and O. Wilson worked closely together for several years conducting and analyzing both survey and case study data. Education and Jobs is the most thorough exploration to date of relations between workers and jobs. The book develops a new paradigm intended to reshape future studies of learning and work.

D.W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work at the University of Toronto, Head of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work at OISE/UT, and Director of the SSHRC national research network on “The Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning” (see http://www.wallnetwork.ca).

For more information, please visit http://www.utphighereducation.com

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JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Coalition for Social Justice’s choice of a campaign on Jobs & Justice is especially apt for the continuing economic crisis affecting so many people. Talking about the public need for good jobs and in general, about  everyone’s need to be treated with justice, is a clear contrast to the sheer greed by a few persons, who seem to be able to get “bailouts” to add to the wealth they already have. The OCSJ and allies and partners advocate different goals:

+++DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is completing its caravan next week, continuing to visit communities in all regions of Ontario, to encourage people to speak out about how the economy is affecting them. Supporters of the OCSJ in numerous communities are joining union members at events in the remaining days:

June 22    At 10:00 a.m. a rally in London will be held outside London City Hall, to reinforce the points made yesterday at a rally with the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers, and Grain Millers’ picket-line at Kellogg’s in that city.

June 23    From 4:15 – 7:00 p.m. a rally will be held at the CAW Local 1999 Hall in St. Catharine’s at 124 Bunting Rd.

June 23    A rally will also take place at 4:30 p.m. in Hamilton at the Hamilton General Hospital at 237 Barton St. E.

June 25    The caravan’s final rally will take place in Toronto at 2:00 p.m. outside the Legislature at Queen’s Park.

The OFL website at http://www.ofl.ca has a link to this campaign named Join the DRV2WRK on a licence plate, with more detail for the events of the caravan. As well, at the bottom of the opening page for the Drive to Work link, you can “have your say” – that is, you can add an anecdote of how you are affected by the economic crisis.

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WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)

The Workers Arts and Heritage Centre, located in Hamilton, Ontario is seeking a dynamic, creative and motivated individual to fill the position of Executive Director. This is a permanent position which will start no later than September 1, 2009. The purpose of the job is to provide professional competency and effective strategic leadership for the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre. The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors through the Executive Committee of the Board. 

Located in the Historic Custom House in Hamilton, Ontario, WAHC works collaboratively with others to engage in artistic activity, preserving the historical, cultural and contemporary experiences of working people in their diverse identities. WAHC performs a number of services including education, research, exhibits, facility rental and a virtual museum. We have a diverse market including workers, their unions and organizations, politicians, youth, heritage supporters, newcomers, aboriginal artists, women and the public. At a provincial and national level we work in a network of labour and community arts practitioners and organizations to produce, support and otherwise engage communities in exchanges and production of cultural events, activities and projects.

For more information, visit: http://www.wahc-museum.ca/w-jobs.php

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)

Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis

The economic crisis is taking a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. Is labour condemned to watch decades of hard-fought gains undone, or can it organize an effective response and go on the offensive?

In our November/December issue, “Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis,” Briarpatch will assess the impact of the global economic crisis on working people and on the labour movement, and investigate the opportunities for advancing a new vision of economic wellbeing grounded in workplace democracy, respect for human rights and an equitable distribution of resources.

If you’ve got something to contribute to this discussion, then we want to hear from you. We are looking for articles, essays, investigative reportage, news briefs, project profiles, interviews with luminary thinkers, reviews, poetry, humour, artwork & photography that shed light on the current situation.

Queries are due by July 6. If your query is accepted, first drafts are due by August 10.

For more information, visit: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/2009/06/11/call-for-submissions-5/

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FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   

June 23, 2009
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Multi-Faith Centre Auditorium, Koffler Institute Building
University of Toronto, 569 Spadina Avenue

In December 2008, the Ontario government committed to review the province’s social assistance system. This commitment was part of Ontario’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy and was restated in the 2009 budget.

765,000 people rely on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program. And thousands of newly unemployed Ontarians will soon be forced to turn to these programs. We are all entitled to a system that gives real assistance when we need it. Social assistance must provide adequate income and meaningful supports to ensure recipients can live lives marked by dignity, decency and opportunity.

Our four insightful and powerful panellists will discuss why we need a bold Social Assistance Review, and how this kind of significant change can take place:

Crystal Chin- Crystal is currently a recipient of ODSP and an active advocate on the Barrier Free Council at Ann Johnston Health Station. Crystal has recently become involved with the ODSP Action Coalition and is a long-time volunteer at Bloorview Kids Rehab.

Marion Overholt- Marion is Staff Lawyer at Legal Assistance of Windsor and a long time poverty law activist and social justice advocate. She is the Social Justice Representative on the Windsor and District Labour Council and chairs the Ford/CAW Local 200 Workplace Adjustment Committee.

Angela Robertson- Angela is the Executive Director of Sistering — A Woman’s Place, and a dedicated community advocate with a commitment to anti-racism, feminism, community-based research, and social justice. Angela is the 2009 YWCA award recipient for social change.

Judy Rebick- Judy is a well-known social justice activist, educator, writer and speaker, and holds the Sam Gindin chair in Social Justice and Democracy at Ryerson University. She is also the founder of rabble.ca, Canada’s most popular independent online news and discussion site.

Join us to make a clear and compelling call for a bold and broad Social Assistance Review- one that leads to economic security for all Ontarians.
 
For more information about this event: email isac@lao.on.ca or call 416-597-5820.

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OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE

“In Cornwall, a high school teacher told us that while they used to raise funds for school trips and sports teams, now they raise money to buy food, because too many students are too hungry to learn.”- Irene Harris, Ontario Federation of Labour’s Drive to Work Caravan

Our Times’ summer issue (Vol. 28 No.3) will be heading to the printer shortly. In this issue, we’re highlighting the courageous struggle of migrant agricultural workers for safe and healthy working conditions and the right to unionize. We’re also featuring the recent historic union stewards’ assembly in Toronto. Plus we’ve got some great creative fiction and non-fiction, including Part 2 of Newfoundland writer Mike Heffernan’s story about a deadly explosion aboard an oil tanker. It’s a great issue, geared to building solidarity in hard times.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by June 25 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

For more information, visit: http://www.ourtimes.ca/index.php

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TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible: Ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities speak out about health care issues was launched on June 5, 2009 at the People in Motion Exhibition, Toronto.

Project Partners: Ethno-Racial People with Disabilities Coalition of Ontario (ERDCO) and Ontario Women’s Health Network (OWHN)

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible updates the innovative community-based research project, We are Visible, conducted in 1996, and highlights the experiences of health and health care of ethno cultural/racialized women with disabilities in Toronto. Through community-based research and a literature review, this project works to understand the barriers to health and health care that ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities face and whether any progress has been made to address the issues discussed by the women in the original We Are Visible project.

Both Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible and the original We are Visible report are available online at http://owhn.on.ca/wearevisible.htm and http://erdco.ca

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COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

‘Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change’ is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education and feminist popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes.
In the final part of the course you will apply these approaches to the work you are doing (or hope to do). All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support.

No experience necessary, but experience is welcome.

Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America over the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

Dates and Times: (attendance at each day & evening required for the certificate)
Sat July 25 (10:00-6:00), Sun July 26 (10:00-6:00), Tues July 28 (6:00-9:00 pm) and Wed July 29 (6:00-9:00 pm)
Location: OISE – 252 Bloor St W. Toronto, Ont.
Cost: $175 (Cdn).  sliding scale available – please ask!

To Register:  Fill out and mail in the registration form on the Transformative Learning Centre website – http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/wordpress/si2008/registration/registration-form/ Course Code: SI09 –C04

For questions contact Christine at: c-mckenzie@sympatico.ca.

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ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS

by John Bonnar (reprinted from rabble.ca)
June 11, 2009

Eleven o’clock Tuesday morning at the Workers’ Action Centre. Media and supporters are jam-packed into a room to listen to representatives of the newly formed Caregivers Action Centre, comprised of former and current caregivers working for change in Temporary Foreign Worker programs including the Live-In Caregiver Program and the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program.

To read more, visit: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/johnbon/2009/06/community-groups-fight-better-living-working-conditions-temporary-for

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Social Services, Faith-Based Organizations, and the Poor
Marci B. Littlefield
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 8 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009337627
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009337627v1

The outsourcing of social care in Britain: what does it mean for voluntary sector workers?
Ian Cunningham and Philip James
Work Employment Society 2009;23 363-375
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/363

Book Review: Gay W. Seidman Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights, and Transnational Activism New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007, $26.00 hbk (ISBN: 0871547619) xvi + 176 pp
David Bartram
Work Employment Society 2009;23 385-387
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/23/2/385

Community Service Among A Panel of Beginning College Students: Its Prevalence and Relationship to Having Been Required and to Supporting “Capital”
James Griffith
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 18 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009338218
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009338218v1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk