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Zizek

Zizek

ŽIŽEK, MIGRATION, EXCLUSION

A WORKSHOP

Thursday 19th February 2015, 3-5pm, Lecture Room 213, Brunel University, London

Irregular immigration is at the forefront of global struggles for economic opportunity, for political rights and for security. Pressed by the increasing influence of both global governing institutions and transnational corporations, along with rising cultural diversity, anxiety about the coherence of the imagined national community within Western nations has increased. This anxiety, along with the global economic downturn and concurrent rises in unemployment, is contributing to the sharpening of ideological policing of national borders, with new legislation targeting irregular immigrants and sympathy for the predicament of those immigrants falling. In turn, the plight of those driven by poverty, environmental insecurity and concerns over security to attempt to gain entry into Western nations outside of official channels has become increasingly fraught, with an estimated 2,500 migrants having drowned in the Mediterranean so far this year (as of October 2014).

For Slavoj Žižek these flows of irregular migrants exemplify a shifting of the borders of political and economic exclusion. Having identified the troubling presence of ‘new forms of apartheid’ most prominently found in the slums, sweatshops and construction projects of ‘the developing world’, this surplus of humanity is increasingly apparent on the borders of the Western world.  Arguing that this surplus is not an aberration in the development of global capitalism, but represents its ‘universal singular’ moment, Žižek suggests that as the ‘part with no part’ of the nation political community, irregular immigrants hold a uniquely disruptive presence.

This workshop brings together prominent Žižekian theorists to discuss the trauma, difficulties and radical political potential of the disruptive presence of irregular immigration and the ‘new forms of apartheid’ of the 21st century.

Speakers

Mark Devenney, University of Brighton

Heiko Feldner, University of Cardiff

Chris McMillan, Brunel University

Fabio Vighi, University of Cardiff

 

Organised by Chris McMillan. For more information, contact Chris.McMillan@brunel.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Multitude

POWER AND EDUCATION – VOLUME 4 NUMBER 2 (2012)

Just published at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/power/content/pdfs/4/issue4_2.asp

POWER AND EDUCATION
Volume 4 Number 2, 2012, ISSN 1757-7438

SPECIAL ISSUE
MIGRATION AND EDUCATION – Part 2
(Part 1 of this theme was published as Volume 3, Number 3, 2011)
Guest Editor: PAUL MILLER

Paul Miller. Editorial. Migration and Education – Part 2

Steven Locke & Carlos J. Ovando. Nicaraguans and the Educational Glass Ceiling in Costa Rica: the stranger in our midst

Liv Thorstensson Dávila. ‘For Them it’s Sink or Swim’: refugee students and the dynamics of migration, and (dis)placement in school

Esther Priyadharshini & Jacqueline Watson. Between Aspiration and Achievement: structure and agency in young migrant lives

Susan V. Meyers. ‘School’s not for anybody’: migration as a sponsor of literacy in the USA–Mexico context

Rafael A. Jiménez Gámez, Mayka García García & Manuel Cotrina García. Educative Assimilation as a Process of Exclusion: the case of immigrant students and ATALs in Cadiz, Spain

Maria Pisani. Addressing the ‘Citizenship Assumption’ in Critical Pedagogy: exploring the case of rejected female sub-Saharan African asylum seekers inMalta

Rebecca L. Stonawski. (Not) Leaving Turkmenistan? A Survey of Students from Turkmenistan at the American University of Central Asia

Norberto Ribeiro, Carla Malafaia Almeida, Maria Fernandes-Jesus, Tiago Neves, Pedro D. Ferreira & Isabel Menezes. Education and Citizenship: redemption or disempowerment? A Study of Portuguese-Speaking Migrant (and Non-migrant) Youth in Portugal

Evie Trouki. The Challenge of Cultural Diversity in Greece: reflections on ‘Intercultural Education Schools’’ (IES) strategy for creating inclusive learning environments

Roberta Ricucci. Youth Migration inItaly: a new working class?

BOOK REVIEWS
Learning Futures: education, technology and social change (Keri Facer), reviewed by Panayota Gounari
Childhood and Consumer Culture (David Buckingham & Vebjorg Tingstad, Eds), reviewed by Albert Chavez
Children at Play: learning gender in the early years (Barbara Martin), reviewed by Emily Gray

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single-user access) Subscription to the 2012 volume (Volume 4, Numbers 1-3), which includes full access to ALL back numbers, is available to individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePOWER.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact p&ejournal@mmu.ac.uk

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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CLR James

GRASSROOTS POLITICS IN THE POSTCOLONY

Call for Papers
Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts (Indiana University Press)
Volume 6, Number 3 (Spring 2013)
Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony

Franco Barchiesi (Ohio State University), Guest Editor

Submissions are invited to explore the politics of contention and social movements in the postcolonial world (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), with particular regard to the ways in which race and ethnicity relate to identities and claims revolving around class, gender, nationality, and religion. Comparative discussions of social contestation in different societies are welcome.

Guest Editor Franco Barchiesi, Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Studies at the Ohio State University, and the editorial staff of Race/Ethnicity invite submissions for Volume 6, Number 3, entitled “Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony”. We welcome submissions from activists, advocates and practitioners working on relevant issues, as well as from scholars in the social sciences and the humanities. In this issue, we look to engage the  following questions:

* How are racial and ethnic identities implicated in collective mobilization (including rural, labor, women, youth, indigenous, and religious movements) in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the “global South”?
* Is the concept of “social movement” useful to understand contemporary forms of social contention and grassroots politics?
* How do racial inequalities shape local contentious politics and everyday forms of social contestation?
* How do claims for racial and ethnic justice relate to grassroots politics in realities of economic liberalization and privatization?
* In which ways do intersections of race and ethnicity with current social conflicts interrogate the legacies of nationalism and decolonization?
* Do processes of migration and diaspora internationalize postcolonial political identities?
* How do grassroots identities, and their elaborations of race and ethnicity, interrogate political institutions and ideas of citizenship and civil society?
* How have postcolonial social movements responded to the global economic crisis and its impact on racial and ethnic dynamics?

Contributions can include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical discussions, and experience-based reflections.

Papers must be received by September 15, 2012 to be considered for publication in this issue.
Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website at http://www.raceethnicity.org/coverart.html for submission guidelines.

Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge shortlidge.2@osu.edu

See Style Guidelines at http://www.raceethnicity.org  

Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website for submission guidelines.

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts encourages and welcomes contributions by scholars, researchers, grassroots activists, policy advocates, and organizations.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Global Capitalism

GLOBAL CAPITALISM AND TRANSNATIONAL CLASS FORMATION

September 16 -18th, 2011
Academy of Sciences
Prague, Czech Republic
Sponsored by the Global Studies Centre, Prague and the Global Studies
Association of North America.

Keynote Speakers: William Robinson and Leslie Sklair

This will be the first international conference devoted to transnational capitalist class theory and global class formation. Over the past decade a growing body of work has established TCC theory as an important theoretical approach for examining global capitalism. The conference will provide a place to share research, debate and explore this newly emerging school of social/economic analysis.

Papers topics can include: transnational capitalist class and working class formations; transnational capitalist class and national capitalist class relations; elite networks; immigration and migration; global capitalism; production networks and commodity chains; global finance; transformation of the nation-state; the transnational state; transnational governance; information technology and globalization; the military/industrial complex and state.

Registration Fees: $80.00 U.S.
Conference web site: http://cgs.flu.cas.cz/redaction.php?action=showRedaction&id_categoryNode=1763

Abstracts should be sent to:
Marek Hrubec, Director of the Global Studies Centre, Academy of Sciences, Prague.
marek.hrubec@gmail.com
Jerry Harris, Organizational Secretary of the Global Studies Association, North America
gharris234@comcast.net
Deadline for Abstracts is June 30th.

International Organizing Committee: William Carroll, Canada; Johannah Fahey, Australia; Jerry Harris, U.S.; Marek Hrubec, Czech Republic; Georgina Murray, Australia, Bill Pelz, U.S.

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

SPACES OF CAPITAL, MOMENTS OF STRUGGLE: EIGHTH ANNUAL HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE

Central London

10–13 November 2011

The ongoing popular uprisings in the Arab world, alongside intimations of a resurgence in workers’ struggles against ‘austerity’ in the North and myriad forms of resistance against exploitation and dispossession across the globe make it imperative for Marxists and leftists to reflect critically on the meaning of collective anticapitalist action in the present.

Over the past decade, many Marxist concepts and debates have come in from the cold. The anticapitalist movement generated a widely circulating critique of capitalist modes of international ‘development’. More recently, the economic crisis that began in 2008 has led to mainstream-recognition of Marx as an analyst of capital. In philosophy and political theory, communism is no longer merely a term of condemnation. Likewise, artistic and cultural practices have also registered a notable upturn in the fortunes of activism, critical utopianism and the effort to capture aesthetically the workings of the capitalist system. 

The eighth annual Historical Materialism conference will strive to take stock of these shifts in the intellectual landscape of the Left in the context of the social and political struggles of the present. Rather than resting content with the compartmentalisation and specialisation of various ‘left turns’ in theory and practice, we envisage the conference as a space for the collective, if necessary, agonistic but comradely, reconstitution of a strategic conception of the mediations between socio-economic transformations and emancipatory politics.

For such a critical theoretical, strategic and organisational reflection to have traction in the present, it must take stock of both the commonalities and the specificities of different struggles for emancipation, as they confront particular strategies of accumulation, political authorities and relations of force. Just as the crisis that began in 2008 is by no means a homogeneous affair, so we cannot simply posit a unity of purpose in contemporary revolutions, struggles around the commons and battles against austerity. 

In consideration of the participation of David Harvey, winner of the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize, at this year’s conference, we would particularly wish to emphasise the historical and geographical dimensions of capital, class and struggle. We specifically encourage paper submissions and suggested panel-themes that tackle the global nature of capitalist accumulation, the significance of anticapitalist resistance in the South, and questions of race, migration and ecology as key components of both the contemporary crisis and the struggle to move beyond capitalism.

There will also be a strong presence of workshops on the historiography of the early communist movement, particularly focusing on the first four congresses of the Communist International.

The conference will aim to combine rigorous and grounded investigations of socio-economic realities with focused theoretical reflections on what emancipation means today, and to explore – in light of cultural, historical and ideological analyses – the forms taken by current and coming struggles.

Deadline for registration of abstracts: 1 May 2011

See: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/8annual/submit

Preference will be given to subscribers to the journal and participants are expected to be present during the whole of the event – no tailor-made timetabling for individuals will be possible, nor will cameo-appearances be tolerated.

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Man in Black

MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS
A Special Issue on MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

The journal Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER) is publishing a special issue on Migration and Education. Papers should address the role education can and should play in the context of migration and/or what migration reveals and conceals about power and education. Migration should be considered as means of empowerment as well as disempowerment. Papers are welcome from all educational disciplines.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that nearly 200 million people across the world are currently living outside their place of birth and that about 3% of the global population are therefore migrants. The mass movement of people in the 21st Century has significant implications for education – from the need to meet legal obligations to educate the children of migrants to the internationalisation of the academic marketplace. Moreover, the legacies of historic migrations continue to impact on education – from the subjugation (and the occasional post-colonial resurrection) of indigenous practices and knowledges to the ethnic lines that still fracture the socio-economic structures of education. If migration presents ‘problems’ then education has a part to play in their resolution – education is widely recognised as a key element of social integration and whilst intolerance can be learned tolerance and mutual respect can be taught.

Power runs through all these issues. It can also be discerned in the on-going debate between multiculturalism and assimilation and the question of whether migrants should be taught the culture of their host countries. Other questions saturated with power include: What histories of migration should be taught? How is the commercialisation of education in an increasingly globalised world driving migration? What is the proper and just approach to the distribution of (typically limited) educational resources to migrants? To what extent can migration be harnessed to empower intercultural education and education for global citizenship?

This special issue of Power and Education will address the complexities of migration from a range of educational disciplines and theoretical frameworks. Contributions are invited that engage with all aspects of migration, including voluntary and forced migration and intra-country migration (e.g. from rural to urban areas) as they impact on children and/or adults and on students and/or teachers. Historical perspectives on the educational legacies of previous migrations are welcome as are considerations of the transition from immigration to integration. Education should be considered in its broadest terms to include all stages of formal education, lifelong learning and informal education. Contributions should specifically address issues of power and/in education and the journal will consider papers engaging with all power paradigms.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
• the Bologna Process
• the ‘brain drain’ and its consequences
• children and language learning
• cultural capital and countries of origin
• displaced children and the inclusion agenda
• global citizenship
• immigration and integration
• refugee academics
• social constructions and interpretations of migration
• teaching and learning diversity in schools

Papers should be no longer than 7000 words and should be submitted by 31 July 2011. Reviews of relevant books are also encouraged. Information on how to submit papers can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER/howtocontribute.asp

Questions about this special issue and the journal should be sent to the editor, Michael F. Watts, via the journal’s website.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 30th JANAURY 2011

 

EVENTS

FREE SCREENING OF ‘HOME SAFE TORONTO’ DOCUMENTARY

Friday, February 4
7:30pm – 10:30pm
The Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

With Street Nurse and Executive Producer Cathy Crowe and Director Laura Sky

HOME SAFE TORONTO is the second in the Sky Works series of documentaries that deals with how Canadian families live with the threat and the experience of homelessness.

It shows how the housing crisis in Canada is an expression of the increasing economic and job insecurity that has devastated the manufacturing sector in the Greater Toronto Area and throughout southern Ontario.

The film reveals the consequences of this “new economy”, where families surviving on low wages with no benefits, or on dwindling social assistance, are faced with the terrible choice between keeping a roof over their heads or putting food on the table.

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GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY

Saturday, February 19
9:30am – 6:00pm
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto

How to join the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca/join

Committees: http://www.workersassembly.ca/committees

Our vision statement: http://www.workersassembly.ca/vision

Contact us at: workingclassfightback@gmail.com

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

Thursday, February 24, 5:00pm – 8 pm and
Friday, February 25, 9:00am – 1:00pm
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Building
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

The OFL and CBTU (Coalition of Black Trade Unionists) present the acclaimed exhibition “And Still I Rise: A History of African Canadian Workers in Ontario.” This travelling exhibit originally developed by the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre explores the rich legacy of Ontario’s black Community.

Four exhibits designed to look like train coaches span the twentieth century with exhibition topics ranging from “Challenges to Freedom”: “1900 to World War II” to the reflective “Legacy of African Canadians”. Visitors are invited to learn more about the historic and present day lives and experiences of Black Canadians through the investigation of themes including immigration, work roles and the labour movement, the agitation of civil rights, the contributions of African Canadians to the arts and sports, the importance of church, schools and voluntary organizations to building strong communities.

For more information, contact Janice Gairey at jgairey@ofl.ca or 416.347.9732.

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“EL CONTRATO”: FILM PRESENTED BY PUEBLITO FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK 2011

February 8, 2011
6:00pm-9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto

“El Contrato” follows the path of migrant workers from Central Mexico to pick tomatos in Lemington, Ontario and the struggles and racism they face. Following the movie, prominent speaker Chris Ramsaroop will be addressing the issues about how immigrant workers in Canada still face injustices in today’s labour market and what should be the role of the Canadian labour movement.

To register for this event please email barrerasandy@hotmail.com with your name, email address and number of tickets you would like to reserve.

Suggested donation: $10.00

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CONFERENCE & CFP – TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION AND ADULT EDUCATION: GLOBAL ISSUES AND DEBATES

June 9, 2011
9:30 am – 4 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

A pre-conference held in conjunction with the 52nd Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Conference

Keynote speakers: Dr. Roxana Ng, OISE/University of Toronto and Dr. Mary V. Alfred, Texas A&M University

When migrants arrive in a new society, they bring with them their values, language and culture, contributing significantly to the diversity of their host countries. Without a doubt, the resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for adult education. However, we are left to grapple with many important questions, such as: What is the impact of transnational migration on adult education? What are the challenges and opportunities for adult education? How can adult education best facilitate migrants’ adaptation in a new society?

Call for Proposals: If you are conducting research or have completed studies in this area, we invite you to submit proposals to: Dr. Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, guos@ucalgary.ca. Deadline: February 15, 2011

For more information: http://silenceandvoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AERC-CASAE-Call-2011.pdf

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NEWS AND VIEWS

RADICAL LABOR EDUCATION, PART I (FROM CHEAP MOTELS AND A HOT PLATE)

By Michael Yates

We are on our way to Amherst, Massachusetts, where I will be teaching a two-week course in labor economics to labor union brothers and sisters.  I have been a labor educator for thirty years. I have taught working people, mostly union leaders and members, a wide variety of courses in all kinds of settings… While working people are often enough unhappy with their work, or lack of it, and alienated from the political system, they ordinarily do not have a very clear understanding of the nature of our political economy or a desire to radically transform it. Why is this?

Read more: http://blog.cheapmotelsandahotplate.org/2010/12/27/radical-labor-education-part-i/

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SHARING IN A COMMON STRUGGLE

By Anthony Arnove, Socialist Worker

Anthony Arnove, Howard Zinn’s collaborator on projects like the book Voices of a People’s History of the United States and the documentary The People Speak, pays tribute to a friend whose sense of solidarity and joy in life was infectious.

FILMING OUR documentary The People Speak in Boston one afternoon, Howard said that the camaraderie between our cast members, the sense of collective purpose and joy, was a feeling he hadn’t experienced with such intensity since his active participation in the civil rights movement.

Since Howard’s passing, I have thought often of that moment, which crystallizes for me what made him so compelling an example of someone committed to, and enjoying to its fullest, a life of struggle.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2010/02/12/sharing-in-the-struggle

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EGYPT (FROM WADE RATHKE: CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG)

If there was ever a more dramatic case study of the political impact of protest on or off the grid of internet, telecommunications, and social networking, the world saw it on the streets of Egypt yesterday. It was as if there were a perfect laboratory experiment on what would happen if the only avenues for protest were “old school” removing the variable of communications.

Read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2011/01/29/egypt/

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BEARING THE BRUNT OF A NEW WITCH-HUNT

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Socialist Worker

The bipartisan campaign against “privileged” public-sector workers threatens to erode some of the gains of the civil rights and Black Power movements.

IN THE run-up to the midterm elections, overheated rhetoric from both Republicans and Democrats identified public-sector workers as a central factor in historically high budget state deficits and the collapse of local economies.

Public-sector workers have been described as the “haves”–as an “elite” group of workers who are living high on the fat of tax dollars, while the rest of the workforce wallows in job insecurity, lack of health care, foreclosure and falling wages.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2011/01/27/brunt-of-a-new-witch-hunt

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“ALONE TOGETHER”: AN MIT PROFESSOR’S NEW BOOK URGES US TO UNPLUG

By David Zax, Fast Company

In her new book, an MIT professor shares her ambivalence about the overuses of technology, which, she writes, “proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies.”

Sherry Turkle has been an ethnographer of our technological world for three decades, hosted all the while at one of its epicenters: MIT. A professor of the social studies of science and technology there, she also heads up its Initiative on Technology and Self. Her new book, Alone Together, completes a trilogy of investigations into the ways humans interact with technology. It can be, at times, a grim read. Fast Company spoke recently with Turkle about connecting, solitude, and how that compulsion to always have your BlackBerry on might actually be hurting your company’s bottom line.

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/1716844/alone-together-an-mit-professors-new-book-urges-us-to-unplug

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POVERTY BY POSTAL CODE 2: VERTICAL POVERTY

Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs. This research is part of United Way’s Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy.

Read more: http://unitedwaytoronto.com/verticalpoverty/report/introduction/

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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Ben Linus

PEOPLE TRAFFICKING: BSA PRESIDENTIAL EVENT

24 January 2011 – BSA Presidential Event: People Trafficking – British Library Conference Centre, London, UK

BOOK YOUR PLACE NOW!

Following on from the success of the first Presidential event on Climate Change, the BSA President, Professor John Brewer, proudly announces the second of a series of Presidential events (free to BSA members). 

PEOPLE TRAFFICKING – This one day conference will examine international migration, immigration and people trafficking.

We are delighted that Robin Cohen, Director of the International Migration Institute at the University of Oxford,  will be taking the lead on this event and presenting International Migration: then and now.

The conference programme includes the following high-profile speakers who, being leaders in their field, are sure to be thought-provoking and invite lively debate:

A welcome to the conference from BSA President: Professor John Brewer.

Professor Robin Cohen, IMI, University of Oxford:  International Migration: then and now.

Dr Bridget Anderson, COMPAS, University of Oxford:  Ethics and Immigration Control.

Professor Karen O’Reilly, Loughborough University:  Lifestyle Migration – the British abroad.

Dr Vron Ware, The Open University:  Soldiers and Migrants – civil-military relations.

Dr Nicola Mai, London Metropolitan University:  Sexuality, Gender and International Migration.

Dr Danny Sriskandarajah, Director of the Royal Commonwealth Society:  Why we need a migration museum?

BOOK YOUR PLACE NOW!

Cost:  FREE for BSA Members*; £25 for Non-Members*

*Places for this event are allocated on a first come, first served basis.  Lunch and refreshments are included.  BSA Members can attend this event free of charge (your 2011 subscription must be paid in advance of registration).  Non-Members of the BSA may also attend this event for a registration fee of £25.

Please direct any queries about this event to events@britsoc.org.uk or call the BSA Events Team on 0191 383 0839.

For further information, please visit the BSA website:  http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/presidential.htm.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

No Future

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCHING WORK AND LEARNING

Special Conference Announcement
International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL)

The Seventh RWL Conference will be taking place in Shanghai, China (December 4-7, 2011)

All conference information can be found at http://www.rwlecnu.org/

Deadline for proposals (papers, symposia, workshops, poster sessions) is March 1st, 2011.

Conference Streams include:
a) Learning, Organizational Change and Organizational Development
b) Professional Work and Learning
c) Leadership Studies in Work and Learning
d) Labour Studies in Work and Learning
e) Trade Unions’ Education and Learning
f) Quality of Work/Learning Life
g) Trans-nationalism, Migration, Work and Learning
h) Work, Learning and Community
i) Learning Theory, Skills and Work
j) Identity, Work and Learning
k) Gender, Ethnicity, Spirituality, Diversity in Workplace and Learning
l) Vocational Education, Labour Markets and Learning
m) Policy Studies, Work and Learning
n) Unpaid Work and Learning
o) Historical Approaches to Work, Learning and Social Change
p) Best practice studies, work and learning

About the RWL Series:
The RWL international conference series was established in 1999 and has run continuously since on a bi-annual basis. Successful conferences have been held in the UK, Canada, Finland, Australia, South Africa, Denmark. In close association with the Journal of Workplace Learning and Emerald Publishing, the RWL series is the longest, continuously running international conference series in the field of work and learning studies currently in operation.

——————————————————————-

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Global Economy

MIGRANT WORKERS’ RIGHTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

ESRC Seminar

Thursday September 2nd 2010 International Slavery Museum, Liverpool, UK

This one-day seminar, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, is the second in the Middlesex University series examining emerging issues of global labour regulation. The seminar will be held at the International Slavery Museum (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/) in Liverpool’s dockside on Thursday September 2nd 2010 from 10am until 5.30pm.

Migration is an integral part of an increasingly internationalised economy. Around 3 per cent of the world’s population, just less than 200 million people, now live and work outside of their own country. This number has been growing at just less than 3 per cent in each year. The increased tendency for people to migrate to work and live has been spurred by changes in the world economy and the effects of structural economic change, or through war and civil upheaval, or environmental damage. Trade liberalisation and market de-regulation has also increased the propensity to migrate, as new geographical patterns of production have emerged. Yet labour migration is not a central concern of international agencies such as the WTO, the IMF or the World Bank. Migrant workers and their families are vulnerable to exploitation and racism, and labour market imbalances can result from migration in both sending and receiving countries.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine migration from a rights –based perspective. We hope to explore aspects of civil, human and social rights of migrant workers as well as labour and economic rights. Migrant labour is thus viewed from within perspectives of forced, slave and child labour as well as economic labour. As such the seminar welcome the participation of those academics, practitioners and migrant worker activists who wish to develop new agendas for regulating migrant labour through a variety of agency and policy initiatives.  

The seminar will be divided into two sessions. The first, thematic session, will examine alternative perspectives on migrant workers’ rights. The second session will present case studies from different world regions. Speakers/Participants will include: 

Marion Hellmann (Assistant General Secretary, Building and Wood Workers International, Geneva) – overview of migrant workers in the world economy

Professor Joshua Castellino (Law Department, Middlesex University) – A Rights Based Approach to Migration

Svetlana Boincean (International Union of Food, Farm and Hotel Workers ) -on eliminating Child Labour in agriculture and tobacco growing 

Heather Connolly and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Manchester University)- Welfare Systems, Social Inclusion and Migrant Worker-Union Relations in the EU

Steve Craig (UCATT building workers’ union, UK) –  Vulnerable Work and Migration in the UK construction industry

Nick McGeehan (director of Mafiwasta www.mafiwasta.com , an organisation for migrant workers in the Gulf).

And case study representations from migrant worker activists in Ireland, the Gulf Region, Italy, and India.

If you are interested in participating in the seminar please register your interest with Denise Arden at d.arden@mdx.ac.uk. Lunch and refreshments are provided and the seminar is free to attend, but registration in advance is necessary. More information can be obtained from the seminar organisers, Professor Martin Upchurch (m.upchurch@mdx.ac.uk) and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Miguel.MartinezLucio@mbs.ac.uk).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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Queen Mary College

COUNTER/MAPPING QUEEN MARY UNIVERSITY: THE UNIVERSITY AND BORDER TECHNOLOGIES

\\\\///\\ Counter/Mapping QMary ////

////////////////\\\////////The university and border technologies

To begin by asking ‘what is the university’ requires an investigation of the function of the university not only as a knowledge factory but also as a border. Our investigation of what the university produces as knowledge, hierarchies and power exposes the border/s that operate in, on and around the university. That ‘the university is a border’ is made possible by the operation of a filter mechanism. The counting of bodies, money in and money out, who can and can not enter, what are we when we leave, the limits of what is and is not knowledge and the complicity with national and global border regimes – who and what is stopped at the border?

A group of students, staff and researchers at Queen Mary University have set out to map the ways in which migration, border technologies, surveillance and monetary flows intersect with the university as our place of work and study. Joining us in the project are the <Counter-Cartographies Collective from the University of North Carolina>, who will help to explore the dynamics and possibilities of mapping as method and action.

From Thursday 13 May – Monday 24 May we will gather to discuss, research and take action to produce a counter map of Queen Mary University. As part of our practice we will be facilitating <three public workshops> to expand the participation and possibilities of the project. These workshops as well as the counter mapping production process are open to all who are interested and are free to attend – please see below for the programme and contact details. The venue for all events will be room 4.08 in the Francis Bancroft Building of Queen Mary Campus and is accessible.

//////Thursday 13 May, 2pm
\\\\\\\\\\Imaginaries of the university

<Opening event of the Counter/Mapping QMary project>

The Counter-Cartographies Collective will present their work on the neo-liberal university and discuss their maps, methodologies and actions. This session will address our imaginaries of the university – current and potential – and will conclude with a drift around QM campus.

\\\\\\\\Thursday 20 May, 2pm
//////////How to make a counter-map

<Workshop: mapping as method, practice and action>

The Counter-Cartographies Collective will facilitate a workshop on radical collaborative mapping skills using available open source mapping software and web-based data-mining techniques. Free and open to all, email us to register.

///////Monday 24 May, 4pm  
\\\\\\\\\\\The politics and potential of counter-mapping

<Presentation and open discussion>

In this event, Counter/Mapping QMary project will present their map of Queen Mary. This presentation will be followed by an open discussion of the methods and politics of mapping the university as a site of migration, education and labour struggles. Invited interlocutors: The Students not Suspects Campaign (Goldsmiths), No Cuts at Queen Mary Campaign, Jane Wills, David Pinder, Ishani Chandrasekara, Miguel Mellino, John Hutnyk, Alberto Toscano

///Contact\\\
Counter/Mapping QMary
countermapping.qmary@googlemail.com
Facebook: countermapping qmary

\\\The Counter///Mapping QMary Project is generously supported by the School of Business and Management and the Geography Department at Queen Mary University.

Map: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/about/campus/mileend/index.html#map

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th FEBRUARY 2010

EVENTS

HEALTH FOR ALL: FIXING A BROKEN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM FOR IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES, TORONTO

March 4th, 2010
6:30 PM
Bahen Centre, Room 1180
40 St. George Street

Speakers:
– Dr. Meb Rashid, Family Physician
– Jackie Esmonde, Immigration Lawyer
– Manavi Handa, Registered Midwife, WestEnd Midwifery Collective

The cost of healthcare has been established as a barrier for under and uninsured migrant communities in accessing healthcare for decades. Despite the talk, few affordable healthcare options have been made available to these communities.

In recent years, the midwifery model of care in Ontario has proved to be a cost effective, accessible option for uninsured populations in Ontario to access maternity care. Community Health Centres are another point of access to primary healthcare for underinsured populations in Ontario. Interdisciplinary staffing and coordination of care, with alternative payment structure arrangements from the Ministry of Health, seek to ensure that uninsured populations have access to primary care.  

This evening will look at the opportunities and barriers to ensuring health for all! The panelists will discuss the successes of these two models of care, and the victories won by various professionals and communities in providing healthcare for the uninsured.

For more information, please email healthforalltoronto@gmail.com

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM

March 1st, 2010
9:00am-12:00pm
Social Planning Toronto
2 Carlton Suite, # 1001 (Carlton & Yonge)

Social Planning Toronto invites you to attend our March Research & Policy Forum. This month we will be looking at issues around immigrant homelessness and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants.

Presenters include:
– Dr. Stephen Hwang, St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto
– Dr. John Shields, Ryerson University/ Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI)

A light breakfast will be provided

To register for this event, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/social-planning-toronto-research-policy-forum-registration/

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RESOURCES FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH (RFR) BOOK SALE

March 8, 2010
Centre for Women’s Studies in Education
Rm. 2-227, OISE
252 Bloor St West, St. George Subway
Toronto,

Proceeds to RFR’s Legal Defense Fund (details at the sale)

For more info: Zoe Newman, email: znewman@yorku.ca

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THE CITY IS A SWEATSHOP

March 19-21
Toronto

No One Is Illegal-Toronto is organizing days of education, community building and idea sharing.

Look out for more details on the events coming soon: http://www.toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/422

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THE POWER OF US: A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN

Monday, March 8, 2010
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Metro-Central YMCA
20 Grosvenor Street, Toronto
(East of Bay Street, north of College Street)

This year, on International Women’s Day, we’re celebrating: Women’s resilience and resistance. Women’s achievements and progress. Women’s voices and women’s spirit.

Join renowned youth activist Jessica Yee and celebrated Canadian artist and performer d’bi young for a special evening to celebrate International Women’s Day 2010.

Jessica Yee – youth activist indigenous hip-hop feminist, author of two books, founder and executive director of the Native Youth Sexual Network, recipient of the 2009 YWCA Young Woman of Distinction Award – and 24 years old.

d’bi young – musician, dub poet, actor, teacher and storyteller – and one of Canada’s most celebrated artists. She is currently playwright-in-residence at CanStage Theatre, author of two dub poetry collections and two plays, producer of five albums, and recipient of countless arts awards.

Tickets are $17.50 through UofTtix
416-978-8849
http://www.uofttix.ca/view.php?id=612

Tickets are also available at
Women’s College Hospital, Ankh Gift Shop for $15 (cash and pickup only).

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NEWS & VIEWS

NEW BOOK FROM THE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK (CSEW)

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work: Reflections on Policy and Practice”

Edited by: Peter Sawchuk, University of Toronto, Canada and Alison Taylor, University of Alberta, Canada

In the past two decades, advanced capitalist countries have seen sustained growth in labour market participation along with a growth in the number of jobs workers tend to have in their working lives. Over a slightly longer period we also see that participation in both formal educational attainment and a range of non-compulsory learning/training has grown. However, labour market discrimination based on gender, age, disability and race/ethnicity remains a serious issue in virtually all OECD countries.

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work” presents a critical and expansive exploration of learning and work transitions within this context. These transitions are challenging for those enmeshed in them and need to be actively challenged through the critical research reported. The impetus for this volume, its conceptual framing, and much of the research emerges from the team of Canadian researchers who together completed case study and survey projects within the ‘Work and Lifelong Learning’ (WALL) network. The authors include leading scholars with established international reputations as well as emerging researchers with fresh perspectives. This volume will appeal to researchers and policy-makers internationally with an interest in educational studies and industrial sociology.

The Knowledge Economy and Education volume 2
ISBN 978-90-8790-887-4 paperback US$49 / €45
ISBN 978-90-8790-888-1 hardback US$99 / €90
February 2010, 340 pages
SensePublishers (http://www.sensepublishers.com)

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VIDEO: CRASH! OCAP VISITS LIBERAL PARTY FUNDRAISER

2010 Heritage Dinner
with special guest the Hon. Dalton McGuinty, MPP

The Liberals talk about ‘poverty reduction’ but the reality is that, well into their second term of office, people on social assistance live on incomes that have lost 55% of their spending power since 1995. We are even poorer today than we were under Mike Harris.

The one handhold that poor people have been able to use to limit their poverty, is a program known as the Special Diet. This provides up to $250 a month if a medical provider considers it necessary. In the last number of years, more and more poor people have become aware of the Special Diet. The misery and suffering that is being inflicted on those losing the Special Diet is enormous and OCAP is here to challenge it.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls40.php

+++++

CANADIAN WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN DECLINE, REPORT SAYS

Canada won’t be winning many medals next month when the United Nations takes stock of women’s equality around the world, according to a new report that charts “systematic erosion” in the status of Canadian women since 2004.

You can view this story at: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/769954–canadian-women-s-rights-in-decline-report-says

You can download the whole Canadian Labour Congress report here: http://www.canadianlabour.ca/sites/default/files/2010-02-22-Canada-Beijing15-NGO-Report-EN.pdf

+++++

CANADA’S MIGRATION POLICIES: FOR CHEAP LABOUR, AGAINST HUMAN FREEDOM

York University professor disputes the positive assessment of Canada’s migration policies in the UN Human Development Report 2009.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/node/2959

+++++

HARPER’S ‘BUY AMERICAN’ PLAN BAD DEAL FOR CANADIANS

Last week the Council of Canadians, along with the Canadian Union of Public Employees, leaked a copy of the Canada-U.S. Agreement on government procurement (the “Buy American” deal) to the media. It was the first time the wide-sweeping deal, which will permanently constrain provincial spending options in many areas, had been put forward for public scrutiny.

To read more: http://www.canadians.org/trade/issues/NAFTA/buy_American.html

+++++

POST-STRIKE MUSINGS: ASSESSING THE OUTCOME OF THE MUSEUM WORKERS’ STRUGGLE

by Priscillia Lefebvre, The Bullet

On December 15th, after a strike lasting 86-days, PSAC workers voted to accept the tentative agreement reached between Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) Local 70396’s bargaining unit and the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (CMCC). The strike occurred after weeks of stalled negotiations resulted in an offer deemed unacceptable by 92% of the voting membership. According to a communiqué released by the CMCC’s chief communications office, the agreement reached by them and the PSAC workers reflect its “commitment to face-to-face discussions, compromise and mutual understanding.” Looking back at their enduring struggle for job security and fair wages throughout negotiations, employees may greet this statement with a difference of opinion. The strike ended in what many consider as a relative victory with gains in the protection of employees against the contracting out of positions; however, the road to success was a long and arduous
one.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/317.php

+++++

JOB POSTINGS

* Executive Director

Organization: The Deepwater Experiential Education Project (DEEP)

Position Type: Part-time time contract (20 hours a week) with potential for full-time based on performance.

Job Region: Based in Toronto with potential need for fundraising- associated travel

Responsibilities:

We are a non-profit that provides scholarships based on need and merit for youth to attend experiential education wilderness programs. We are seeking a self-directed individual with an accomplished background in administration and fundraising for the position of Executive Director. This is an opportunity to take a leadership role in a small organization and operate with considerable discretion and flexibility.

To read more: http://www.deepwaterproject.org

(from Canada’s Green Job Site, http://www.GoodWorkCanada.ca)

+++++

* Intake Support Worker, Working Skills Centre, Toronto

Key Responsibilities:

-Provide career assessment support to applicants for certificate and diploma skills training programs at Working Skills Centre, a non-profit community agency serving immigrants, primarily women.
-Conduct weekly information sessions (training will be provided)
-Provide support for students once enrolled, responding to inquires and helping to find solutions to settlement, family, housing, and workload concerns
-Work with the Graduate Services Coordinator to monitor internal volunteer placement opportunities and match candidates to these opportunities
-Mark assessment tests, provide information on results to clients, help clients to determine career paths based on competencies
-Assist WSC staff to monitor Essential Skills Portfolios with students enrolled in training programs

Qualifications:
-A keen interest in providing assistance to immigrants and helping them understand the Canadian labour market
-University or college degree or equivalent community work experience helping individuals in some HR capacity
-Strong computer skills (MS Office and Internet Search)
-Past experience using an Access Database an asset
-Ability to problem solve and work independently if needed

Position Details:
-Wage rate: $14.10/hr, 30/hr/wk (FTE $27,500/year)
-Start date: immediately
-Contact position for 11 months (46 weeks)
-Individual must meet Investing in Neighbourhoods criteria:
-Unemployed, client, spouse, dependent adult on Ontario Works
-Family in receipt of NCBS or OCB

How to Apply:
Send a resume to: Honey Crossley by email: mailto: hcrossley@workingskillscentre.com

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca  To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski