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CORPORATE CARE: MIGRANT LABOUR AND THE CARE INDUSTRY IN TIMES OF (NON) CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Corporate Care: Migrant labour and the care industry in times of (non) crisis

A one-day conference at Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London, 29 October 2015

Deadline: June 12, 2015

Though unsurprisingly hitting the low-income and unemployed harder than ever, the 2007-2011 Global Economic Crisis and subsequent politics of austerity have also revealed the emergence of new and unexpected trends in the West: in the immediate aftermath of the crisis, both non-migrant and migrant women in numerous Western countries were less affected than men in terms of jobs losses, though their working conditions might have not improved. Subsequent austerity policies, on the other hand, seem to have disadvantaged women in terms of working conditions, though they also appear to have reinforced their commitment to paid work (Karamessini and Rubery, ed., 2013; Farris, 2015).

The intertwined fate of non-migrant and migrant women during and after the crisis is due to their position vis-à-vis care, or social reproduction. The assumption that care is a “woman’s job” remains firmly in place, while public state care provision continues to shrink. But while non-migrant women’s rate of participation in the workforce means that they do less unpaid care work in comparison to previous periods, migrant women from ‘post-socialist’ countries and the Global South take on the bulk of the social reproductive tasks in paid form in the booming care industry.

But what is the care industry? How did the crisis change its configuration?

Studies conducted across Europe and the West in the last ten years show that the care industry was not negatively affected by the crisis. On the contrary, the demand for care and domestic service has grown rather than decreased. Moreover, a process of polarization appears to be impacting upon migrant workers employed in the care industry: on the one hand, a proliferation of domestic and care placement agencies as well as so-called ‘non-profit’ organisations (particularly in Southern Europe) is increasingly meeting the growing demand for carers and housekeepers by individual households. Effectively functioning as corporations, many of these organisations are making enormous profits out of mediating for, or directly exploiting, the hugely needed work of migrants in the care sector. On the other hand, anti-immigration policies at the national level and the refusal of numerous states to issue visas for care and domestic workers (particularly during the first years of the crisis) have pushed migrants working in this sector into the underground. But rather than being discouraged to employ migrants, more and more families in fact rely upon “word of mouth” to hire them as carers and housekeepers, as they remain the most cost-effective solution for their caring needs. Yet even in the underground, illegal agencies and organisations profiting from this flourishing industry begin to emerge.

With the crisis and austerity politics in the background, this one day conference aims to analyse this new set of dynamics by focusing upon the care industry, the emergence of corporate care and (female) migrant labour in particular.

While the employment of migrant women in the care industry has been widely studied, the impact of the recent crisis and austerity politics on female migrant labour in the care sector and the boom of care placement agencies have remained largely under-scrutinized.

This conference thus aims to fill a gap in this field of studies by seeking papers that address the following questions in particular:

  • How does the increasing presence of corporations and also non-profit organisations in the care industry in a period of crisis and austerity affect the sector?
  • How does the profitability of care impact upon our understanding of social reproduction theory in particular?
  • How do care and domestic placement agencies change conceptions and cultures of care and domestic work?
  • How have the crisis and austerity politics transformed the working conditions of migrants in the care sector in different countries?

Abstracts should be 300 words long and clearly state the question they address. Preference will be given to papers that seek to combine theoretical and empirical work.

Deadline for submission is June 12, 2015. Please send abstracts and any inquiries to s.farris@gold.ac.uk

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-corporate-care.-migrant-labour-and-the-care-industry-in-times-of-non-crisis.-goldsmiths-college-29-october-2015

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Utopia

SOCIAL HISTORY 6 (2011) IS ONLINE

 Liebe Leserin, lieber Leser,

Heft 6 (2011) der Zeitschrift Sozial.Geschichte Online steht ab heute (wie immer frei) zur Verfügung. Hier können die Texte als pdf. heruntergeladen werden.

The new issue of Social History online is online. Please use the following link: http://duepublico.uni-duisburg-essen.de/servlets/DocumentServlet?id=26797

Best regards,
Max Henninger / Peter Birke

Inhalt / Contents

Forschung / Research

Wang Kan, Collective Awakening and Action of Chinese Workers: The 2010 Auto Workers’ Strike and its Effects

Peter Birke, Diese merkwürdige, zerklüftete Landschaft: Anmerkungen zur „Stadt in der Revolte“

Emiliana Armano, Notes on Some Features of Knowledge Work: A Social Inquiry into Knowledge Workers in Turin

Diskussion / Discussion

Tobias Mulot, Coyotismus: Die konstituierende Kraft der Flucht. Anmerkungen zu Escape Routes

Zeitgeschehen / Current Events

Gregor Kritidis, Die Demokratie in Griechenland zwischen Ende und Wiedergeburt

Karl Heinz Roth, Griechenland und die Euro-Krise

Kristin Carls / Dario Iamele, Stop that train – Entwicklung und Aktualität der No-TAV-Bewegung gegen die Hochgeschwindigkeitstrasse Turin–Lyon

Manal Tibe, Notes on the Situation in Egypt Since Mubarak’s Resignation

Jahrestage / Anniversaries

Gisela Notz, Soziale und politische Gleichberechtigung für alle Frauen. Zur hundertjährigen Geschichte des Internationalen Frauentags in Deutschland

Tagungsberichte / Conference Proceedings

Torsten Bewernitz, Strikes and Social Conflicts in the 20th Century, Lissabon, 16.–20. März 2011

Matthias Möller / Sonja Nielbock / Andrea Papst / Nicole Vrenegor, Recht auf Stadt – Vier Fragen und vier Perspektiven. Anmerkungen zu einem Kongress in Hamburg

Tagung / Conference

Labour Beyond State, Nation, Race: Global Labour History as a New Paradigm, University of Kassel, 26 November 2011

Rezensionen / Book Reviews

Jan Ole Arps, Frühschicht. Linke Fabrikintervention in den 70er Jahren (Mischa Suter)

Andrej Holm / Dirk Gebhardt (Hg.), Initiativen für ein Recht auf Stadt. Theorien und Praxis städtischer Aneignungen (Florian Hohenstatt)

Daniel Heintz, Tierschutz im Dritten Reich (Mieke Roscher)

Ralf Hoffrogge, Richard Müller. Der Mann hinter der Novemberrevolution (Dario Azzellini)

Ilse Lenz (Hg.), Die Neue Frauenbewegung in Deutschland. Abschied vom kleinen Unterschied (Kirsten Achtelik)

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Antonio Negri

SELF ORGANISING III: COMMUNITY

Friday May 6th  2011
Venue: Lock Keepers Cottage, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End, E1 4NS
Nearest Station: Mile End
Time: 5-7pm
Self-Organising: http://www.self-org.blogspot.com/

An encounter to muse and think together about external dynamics, political discourse and outreach; the role of the organizer when working with constituencies; issues of politicization, outreach, involvement and negotiation.

Conversations will be triggered by:

Doina Petrescu (Atelier d’Architecture Autogérée, Paris)

Doina Petrescu is an architect, co-founder together with Constantin Petcou of atelier d’architecture autogérée (aaa) in Paris and Professor of Architecture and Design Activism at the University of Sheffield. Her publications include Trans – Local – Act: cultural practices within and across (2010), Agency: Working with Uncertain Architectures (2009), Altering Practices: Feminist Politics and Poetics of Space (2007), Urban Act: a handbook for alternative practice (2007), Architecture and Participation (2005). During our session, Doina will speak about metropolitan commons and self-organised spaces.

Jane Wills (QMUL, London)

Jane Wills has research interests in low paid employment, migration, trade unionism and new forms of labour organisation, the living wage, community organising and political-economy. Her new co-authored book on low paid migrant labour in London entitled Global Cities at Work: new migrant divisions of labour was published by Pluto in 2010. Jane is convenor of the MA Community Organising and an active member of London Citizens.

RESOURCES:

C. Petcou, D.Petrescu, Acting Space
Published in Multitudes 3/ 2007, Urban/Act and included in the disobedience archive
http://www.disobediencearchive.com/texts/index.html

D. Petrescu, Jardinieres du commun
published in Multitudes 44/2010
http://multitudes.samizdat.net/Jardinieres-du-commun

and Trans-Local-Act.
C. Petcou, D.Petrescu, At the Ground Level of the City
Published in Multitudes 20/2005
http://multitudes.samizdat.net/Au-rez-de-chaussee-de-la-ville

and The Right to the City (Sydney, 2011)
What makes a biopolitical place?
A Discussion with Toni Negri, Constantin Petcou, Doina Petrescu, Anne Querrien, Paris – September 17, 2007
Published in Multitudes 3/ 2007 – In English: http://www.peprav.net/tool/spip.php?article59

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 30th JANAURY 2011

 

EVENTS

FREE SCREENING OF ‘HOME SAFE TORONTO’ DOCUMENTARY

Friday, February 4
7:30pm – 10:30pm
The Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

With Street Nurse and Executive Producer Cathy Crowe and Director Laura Sky

HOME SAFE TORONTO is the second in the Sky Works series of documentaries that deals with how Canadian families live with the threat and the experience of homelessness.

It shows how the housing crisis in Canada is an expression of the increasing economic and job insecurity that has devastated the manufacturing sector in the Greater Toronto Area and throughout southern Ontario.

The film reveals the consequences of this “new economy”, where families surviving on low wages with no benefits, or on dwindling social assistance, are faced with the terrible choice between keeping a roof over their heads or putting food on the table.

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GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY

Saturday, February 19
9:30am – 6:00pm
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto

How to join the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca/join

Committees: http://www.workersassembly.ca/committees

Our vision statement: http://www.workersassembly.ca/vision

Contact us at: workingclassfightback@gmail.com

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

Thursday, February 24, 5:00pm – 8 pm and
Friday, February 25, 9:00am – 1:00pm
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Building
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

The OFL and CBTU (Coalition of Black Trade Unionists) present the acclaimed exhibition “And Still I Rise: A History of African Canadian Workers in Ontario.” This travelling exhibit originally developed by the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre explores the rich legacy of Ontario’s black Community.

Four exhibits designed to look like train coaches span the twentieth century with exhibition topics ranging from “Challenges to Freedom”: “1900 to World War II” to the reflective “Legacy of African Canadians”. Visitors are invited to learn more about the historic and present day lives and experiences of Black Canadians through the investigation of themes including immigration, work roles and the labour movement, the agitation of civil rights, the contributions of African Canadians to the arts and sports, the importance of church, schools and voluntary organizations to building strong communities.

For more information, contact Janice Gairey at jgairey@ofl.ca or 416.347.9732.

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“EL CONTRATO”: FILM PRESENTED BY PUEBLITO FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK 2011

February 8, 2011
6:00pm-9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto

“El Contrato” follows the path of migrant workers from Central Mexico to pick tomatos in Lemington, Ontario and the struggles and racism they face. Following the movie, prominent speaker Chris Ramsaroop will be addressing the issues about how immigrant workers in Canada still face injustices in today’s labour market and what should be the role of the Canadian labour movement.

To register for this event please email barrerasandy@hotmail.com with your name, email address and number of tickets you would like to reserve.

Suggested donation: $10.00

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CONFERENCE & CFP – TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION AND ADULT EDUCATION: GLOBAL ISSUES AND DEBATES

June 9, 2011
9:30 am – 4 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

A pre-conference held in conjunction with the 52nd Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Conference

Keynote speakers: Dr. Roxana Ng, OISE/University of Toronto and Dr. Mary V. Alfred, Texas A&M University

When migrants arrive in a new society, they bring with them their values, language and culture, contributing significantly to the diversity of their host countries. Without a doubt, the resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for adult education. However, we are left to grapple with many important questions, such as: What is the impact of transnational migration on adult education? What are the challenges and opportunities for adult education? How can adult education best facilitate migrants’ adaptation in a new society?

Call for Proposals: If you are conducting research or have completed studies in this area, we invite you to submit proposals to: Dr. Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, guos@ucalgary.ca. Deadline: February 15, 2011

For more information: http://silenceandvoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AERC-CASAE-Call-2011.pdf

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NEWS AND VIEWS

RADICAL LABOR EDUCATION, PART I (FROM CHEAP MOTELS AND A HOT PLATE)

By Michael Yates

We are on our way to Amherst, Massachusetts, where I will be teaching a two-week course in labor economics to labor union brothers and sisters.  I have been a labor educator for thirty years. I have taught working people, mostly union leaders and members, a wide variety of courses in all kinds of settings… While working people are often enough unhappy with their work, or lack of it, and alienated from the political system, they ordinarily do not have a very clear understanding of the nature of our political economy or a desire to radically transform it. Why is this?

Read more: http://blog.cheapmotelsandahotplate.org/2010/12/27/radical-labor-education-part-i/

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SHARING IN A COMMON STRUGGLE

By Anthony Arnove, Socialist Worker

Anthony Arnove, Howard Zinn’s collaborator on projects like the book Voices of a People’s History of the United States and the documentary The People Speak, pays tribute to a friend whose sense of solidarity and joy in life was infectious.

FILMING OUR documentary The People Speak in Boston one afternoon, Howard said that the camaraderie between our cast members, the sense of collective purpose and joy, was a feeling he hadn’t experienced with such intensity since his active participation in the civil rights movement.

Since Howard’s passing, I have thought often of that moment, which crystallizes for me what made him so compelling an example of someone committed to, and enjoying to its fullest, a life of struggle.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2010/02/12/sharing-in-the-struggle

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EGYPT (FROM WADE RATHKE: CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG)

If there was ever a more dramatic case study of the political impact of protest on or off the grid of internet, telecommunications, and social networking, the world saw it on the streets of Egypt yesterday. It was as if there were a perfect laboratory experiment on what would happen if the only avenues for protest were “old school” removing the variable of communications.

Read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2011/01/29/egypt/

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BEARING THE BRUNT OF A NEW WITCH-HUNT

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Socialist Worker

The bipartisan campaign against “privileged” public-sector workers threatens to erode some of the gains of the civil rights and Black Power movements.

IN THE run-up to the midterm elections, overheated rhetoric from both Republicans and Democrats identified public-sector workers as a central factor in historically high budget state deficits and the collapse of local economies.

Public-sector workers have been described as the “haves”–as an “elite” group of workers who are living high on the fat of tax dollars, while the rest of the workforce wallows in job insecurity, lack of health care, foreclosure and falling wages.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2011/01/27/brunt-of-a-new-witch-hunt

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“ALONE TOGETHER”: AN MIT PROFESSOR’S NEW BOOK URGES US TO UNPLUG

By David Zax, Fast Company

In her new book, an MIT professor shares her ambivalence about the overuses of technology, which, she writes, “proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies.”

Sherry Turkle has been an ethnographer of our technological world for three decades, hosted all the while at one of its epicenters: MIT. A professor of the social studies of science and technology there, she also heads up its Initiative on Technology and Self. Her new book, Alone Together, completes a trilogy of investigations into the ways humans interact with technology. It can be, at times, a grim read. Fast Company spoke recently with Turkle about connecting, solitude, and how that compulsion to always have your BlackBerry on might actually be hurting your company’s bottom line.

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/1716844/alone-together-an-mit-professors-new-book-urges-us-to-unplug

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POVERTY BY POSTAL CODE 2: VERTICAL POVERTY

Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs. This research is part of United Way’s Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy.

Read more: http://unitedwaytoronto.com/verticalpoverty/report/introduction/

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Global Economy

MIGRANT WORKERS’ RIGHTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

ESRC Seminar

Thursday September 2nd 2010 International Slavery Museum, Liverpool, UK

This one-day seminar, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, is the second in the Middlesex University series examining emerging issues of global labour regulation. The seminar will be held at the International Slavery Museum (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/) in Liverpool’s dockside on Thursday September 2nd 2010 from 10am until 5.30pm.

Migration is an integral part of an increasingly internationalised economy. Around 3 per cent of the world’s population, just less than 200 million people, now live and work outside of their own country. This number has been growing at just less than 3 per cent in each year. The increased tendency for people to migrate to work and live has been spurred by changes in the world economy and the effects of structural economic change, or through war and civil upheaval, or environmental damage. Trade liberalisation and market de-regulation has also increased the propensity to migrate, as new geographical patterns of production have emerged. Yet labour migration is not a central concern of international agencies such as the WTO, the IMF or the World Bank. Migrant workers and their families are vulnerable to exploitation and racism, and labour market imbalances can result from migration in both sending and receiving countries.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine migration from a rights –based perspective. We hope to explore aspects of civil, human and social rights of migrant workers as well as labour and economic rights. Migrant labour is thus viewed from within perspectives of forced, slave and child labour as well as economic labour. As such the seminar welcome the participation of those academics, practitioners and migrant worker activists who wish to develop new agendas for regulating migrant labour through a variety of agency and policy initiatives.  

The seminar will be divided into two sessions. The first, thematic session, will examine alternative perspectives on migrant workers’ rights. The second session will present case studies from different world regions. Speakers/Participants will include: 

Marion Hellmann (Assistant General Secretary, Building and Wood Workers International, Geneva) – overview of migrant workers in the world economy

Professor Joshua Castellino (Law Department, Middlesex University) – A Rights Based Approach to Migration

Svetlana Boincean (International Union of Food, Farm and Hotel Workers ) -on eliminating Child Labour in agriculture and tobacco growing 

Heather Connolly and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Manchester University)- Welfare Systems, Social Inclusion and Migrant Worker-Union Relations in the EU

Steve Craig (UCATT building workers’ union, UK) –  Vulnerable Work and Migration in the UK construction industry

Nick McGeehan (director of Mafiwasta www.mafiwasta.com , an organisation for migrant workers in the Gulf).

And case study representations from migrant worker activists in Ireland, the Gulf Region, Italy, and India.

If you are interested in participating in the seminar please register your interest with Denise Arden at d.arden@mdx.ac.uk. Lunch and refreshments are provided and the seminar is free to attend, but registration in advance is necessary. More information can be obtained from the seminar organisers, Professor Martin Upchurch (m.upchurch@mdx.ac.uk) and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Miguel.MartinezLucio@mbs.ac.uk).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Marx was Right

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM TORONTO CONFERENCE 2010 – UPDATE 17th APRIL 2010

Historical Materialism 2010, York University, Toronto, May 13-16

Dear friends

We are fast approaching the second Historical Materialism Conference to be held at York University in Toronto. With over 250 papers and speakers from eight countries, it is shaping up to be an exciting event for critical theory and practice.

Our plenary speakers include Terry Eagleton, Andrea Smith, Vijay Prashad, Johanna Brenner, Aziz Choudry, Dorothy Smith, Kevin Anderson, and David McNally, among others.

Plenary topics include “Marx and the Global South,” “Global Crisis, Working Class Households and Migrant Labour,” “Capitalism, Race and Colonialism,” and “Is Marxism a Theodicy?” We will also be running a four-part course on Marx’s Capital.

Details on registration, accommodation and the conference program are available at http://www.yorku.ca/hmyork To see the preliminary list of panels, click on the Program tab, then click on “Themes.”

Please spread the word about the conference. We look forward to seeing you at York in May!

The Historical Materialism Toronto Conference Organizing Committee

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski