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Capitorg

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

 

Venue: SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL

Date: Thursday 14th July 2011

From 1pm- 4pm (lunch available from 12:30pm)

 

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

 

Ethical dilemmas in widening participation: issues of pedagogy and identity

Dr Jacqueline Stevenson, Leeds Metropolitan University

For more than a decade various governmental policy initiatives have been implemented in the UK to increase the number of students attending higher education. However, whilst these initiatives have been widely critiqued there has been almost no consideration as to the ethical implications of widening participation. This is a significant omission since both WP policy and practice give rise to serious ethical concerns, not least being whether we should continue to increase access to HE at all knowing that many widening participation students are more likely to drop out, get worse degrees, graduate with higher levels of debt and be less employable post-graduation than their peers. Drawing on issues of pedagogy, student support and both staff and student identities, this presentation will act as a ‘think-piece’ offering an opportunity to consider the implications of widening participation from both an ‘ethics of justice’ and ‘ethics of care’ perspective. 

 

Widening Participation and the Capability Approach

Dr Michael F. Watts, University of Cambridge

This paper uses the capability approach to address the ethics of the widening participation agenda.  The capability approach de-emphasises the significance of commodities (including educational commodities) in favour of the opportunities they enable in pursuit of the good life.  It demands a context-based understanding of how the socio-cultural circumstances of young people influence the real opportunities they have to recognise the value of and engage with higher education.  This more nuanced engagement with the concept of well-being recognises that the inevitability of human diversity generates different realisations of the good life.  It also enables engagement with the adaptation of preferences that continue to bedevil attempts to increase access to higher education.  The focus on freedom, illustrated here with reference to a number of empirical studies, frames a more just approach to widening participation that is concerned with what young people have rather than what they lack. 

 

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   Please include the name of your institution and whether you are an SRHE or UALL member.

Cost:

SRHE members: free

UALL members: £25

All Non members: £40

Payment can be made by cheque (made payable SRHE and sent to SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL ) or phone through with credit card details.  Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance given by 7 July 2011.

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel: +44 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Books

REBEL, RANK AND FILE

NEW TITLE FROM VERSO
Edited by AARON BRENNER, ROBERT BRENNER and CAL WINSLOW
—————————–
“Extraordinary reflections….this collection dramatically reasserts the role of rank-and-file revolt in shaping American labor history and offers rich lessons to contemporary rebels.” Mike Davis

“Truly shines … By uncovering the hidden history of the 1970s, REBEL RANK AND FILE reminds us that there is another path to union renewal—a path firmly rooted in the workplace and motivated by visions of transforming society.”
– Joe Burns, IN THESE TIMES
—————————–
From the mid-1960s to 1981, rank-and-file workers in the United States engaged in a level of sustained militancy not seen since the Great Depression and World War II. Millions participated in one of the largest strike waves in US history. There were 5,716 stoppages in 1970 alone, involving more than 3 million workers. Contract rejections, collective insubordination, sabotage, organized slowdowns, and wildcat strikes were the order of the day.
Workers targeted much of their activity at union leaders, forming caucuses to fight for more democratic and combative unions that would forcefully resist the mounting offensive from employers that appeared at the end of the postwar economic boom. It was a remarkable era in the history of US class struggle, one rich in lessons for today’s labor movement.

The labor struggles in this period have been somewhat overlooked by historians, making this the first in-depth and comprehensive account. The period included strikes which had a significant and lasting impact, such as the Memphis sanitation workers strike which broke the back of racial inequality in the workplace, and the West Virginia coal miners strike which forced the passage of Black Lung legislation.

The struggles in this time also blazed a trail for a new radical and grassroots trade unionism which incorporated demands for racial and sexual equality and challenging entrenched bureaucracies within the union movement itself. The challenge to union bureaucracies led to some remarkable episodes, such as the attempt by UAW leaders to break a wildcat strike at Chrysler’s Mack Avenue stamping plant in Detroit by mobilizing one thousand armed officials and loyalists.

The struggles in this period challenge common assumptions about the US working class – that it is naturally conservative, nationalistic and inward looking. It recaptures a time when millions of ordinary working people engaged in militant action against workplace exploitation, racism and sexism. The book also includes a number of remarkable photographs of the those involved in the struggles by the veteran photojournalist Earl Dotter, a sample of which can be viewed at www.earldotter.com .
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REBEL, RANK AND FILE contains contributions from, in addition to the editors, Judith Stein, Kim Moody, Frank Bardacke, Paul J. Nyden, Dan La Botz, Marjorie Murphy, A. C. Jones, Kieran Taylor, Dorothy Sue Cobble and Steve Early.
——————————-
Praise for REBEL RANK AND FILE:

“An important collection … honest and thoughtful.”
– WORLD WIDE WORK

“This is an unusually high-quality effort, with an all-star cast of authors, which should attract wide interest.”
– Nelson Lichtenstein, Professor of History at University of California Santa Barbara

“Bracing and often electrifying … A primer and a call to arms for a radical rank-and-file politics.”
– Michael Watts, Professor of Geography and Development Studies at UC Berkeley
———————————
Aaron Brenner is President of Rank & File Enterprises, a financial and labor research firm. Robert Brenner is Director of the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at UCLA. He is the author of THE BOOM AND THE BUBBLE, MERCHANTS AND REVOLUTION, THE ECONOMICS OF GLOBAL TURBULENCE. Cal Winslow is Director of the Mendocino Institute and Fellow in Environmental Politics, UC Berkeley.
———————————
ISBN: 978 1 84467 174 8 / $29.95 / £19.99 / CAN$37.50 / Paperback / 432 Pages
———————————
For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/282-rebel-rank-and-file
———————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789

And get updates on Twitter too!
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Education

POWER AND EDUCATION – VOLUME 2 NUMBER 3 (2010)

Just published at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/power/content/pdfs/2/issue2_3.asp

POWER AND EDUCATION
Volume 2 Number 3 2010, ISSN 1757-7438

CONTENTS:

Brenda G. Juárez & Cleveland Hayes. Social Justice Is Not Spoken Here: considering the nexus of knowledge, power and the education of future teachers in the United States

Liz Atkins. Opportunity and Aspiration, or the Great Deception? The Case of 14-19 Vocational Education

Habib G. Siam. Me, We: an unconventional, non-linear and sometimes nonsensical journey into the literacy experiences of a wandering mind

Velibor Bobo Kovac & Aslaug Kristiansen. Trusting Trust in the Context of Higher Education: the potential limits of the trust concept

Chris Holligan. Building One-Dimensional Places: death by the power of audit

Robert LeBlanc. Reform, Ideology and the Politics of Waiting for ‘Superman’

Sharif Bey. Teaching and Cultural Domination: re-examining trajectories of traditional African sculpture through critique

Michael F. Watts. Drugs and Drugs Education Policy: what counts as evidence

Henry A. Giroux. Paulo Freire and the Crisis of the Political

BOOK REVIEWS
Teaching against Islamophobia (Joe L. Kincheloe, Shirley R. Steinberg & Christopher D. Stonebanks, Eds), reviewed by Barry van Driel
Teaching Critical Thinking: practical wisdom (bell hooks), reviewed by Kamila Kaminska
Cultural-historical Perspectives on Teacher Education and Development: learning teaching (Viv Ellis, Anne Edwards & Peter Smagorinsky, Eds), reviewed by Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single-user access). Subscription to Volume 3, 2011, which includes not only full access to the articles in Volume 3, Numbers 1-3, but also ALL back numbers (including those of 2010) is available to individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePOWER.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the journal’s Editor, Dr Michael Watts (michael.watts@wwwords.eu)

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Deadwing

POWER AND EDUCATION – VOLUME 2 NUMBER 2 (2010)

Just published at:
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/power/content/pdfs/2/issue2_2.asp

POWER AND EDUCATION
Volume 2 Number 2 2010       ISSN 1757-7438

ARTICLES

John Preston. Concrete and Abstract Racial Domination

Damien Page. Power and Resistance in Further Education: findings from a study of first-tier managers

Shirley R. Steinberg, with Joe L. Kincheloe. Power, Emancipation, and Complexity: employing critical theory

Alan Cottey. The Shadow of the Bomb: a study of degree-level nuclear physics textbooks

Laurette Bristol. Practising in betwixt Oppression and Subversion: plantation pedagogy as a legacy of plantation economy in Trinidad and Tobago

Katherine R. Evans, Jessica Lester & Amy D. Broemmel. Talking Back to Scripted Curricula: a critical performance ethnography with teachers’ collective narratives

James Avis. Education, Governance and the ‘New’ Professionalism: radical possibilities?

Andrew Lambirth. Class Consciousness, Power, Identity, and the Motivation to Teach

BOOK REVIEWS

Habermas, Honneth and Education: the significance of Jürgen Habermas’s and Axel Honneth’s critical theories to education (Rauno Huttunen), reviewed by Mark Murphy

Racially Equitable Teaching: beyond the whiteness of professional development for early childhood educators (Mary E. Earick), reviewed by Laurie Carlson Berg

Going Beyond the Theory/Practice Divide in Early Childhood Education: introducing an intra-active pedagogy (Hillevi Lenz Taguchi), reviewed by Barbara McNeil

Reflexive Research and the (Re)Turn of the Baroque (or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the University) (Cate Watson), reviewed by Ian Stronach

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single-user access). Subscription to Volume 3, 2011, which includes not only full access to the articles in Volume 3, Numbers 1-3, but also ALL back numbers (including those of 2010) is available to individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePOWER.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the journal’s Editor, Dr Michael Watts (michael.watts@wwwords.eu)

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Capitalism

THE POINT IS TO CHANGE IT

Antipode
Volume 41, Issue 1, 2010

Online ISSN: 1467-8330 Print ISSN: 0066-4812

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123329956/issue

Journal compilation © 2010 Editorial Board of Antipode

Introduction

1-9
Introduction: The Point Is To Change It
Noel Castree, Paul Chatterton, Nik Heynen, Wendy Larner, Melissa W. Wright
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00713.x

Original Articles

10-26
Now and Then1
Michael J. Watts
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00714.x

27-49
The Idea of Socialism: From 1968 to the Present-day Crisis
Hugo Radice
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00715.x

50-65
The Revolutionary Imperative
Neil Smith
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00716.x

66-93
To Make Live or Let Die? Rural Dispossession and the Protection of Surplus Populations
Tania Murray Li
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00717.x

94-116
Postneoliberalism and its Malcontents
Jamie Peck, Nik Theodore, Neil Brenner
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00718.x

117-141
D/developments after the Meltdown
Gillian Hart
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00719.x

142-165
Is the Globalization Consensus Dead?
Robert Wade
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00720.x

166-184
The Uses of Neoliberalism
James Ferguson
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00721.x

185-213
Crisis, Continuity and Change: Neoliberalism, the Left and the Future of Capitalism
Noel Castree
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00722.x

214-238
Money Games: Currencies and Power in the Contemporary World Economy
John Agnew
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00723.x

239-261
Pre-Black Futures
Katharyne Mitchell
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00724.x

262-280
The Shape of Capitalism to Come
Paul Cammack
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00725.x

281-297
Who Counts? Dilemmas of Justice in a Postwestphalian World
Nancy Fraser
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00726.x

298-319
The Communist Hypothesis and Revolutionary Capitalisms: Exploring the Idea of Communist Geographies for the Twenty-first Century
Erik Swyngedouw
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00727.x

320-346
An Economic Ethics for the Anthropocene
J. K. Gibson Graham, Gerda Roelvink
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00728.x

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski