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Tag Archives: Metaphor

Richard Alpert

PROBLEMATISING THE RELATIONS BETWEEN STUDENTS’ PASTS, PRESENTS AND FUTURES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Academic Practice Network

Problematising the relations between students’ pasts, presents and futures in higher education

SRHE 44 Bedford Row, London, WC1R 4LL

22 September 2010 1pm – 4pm

‘Using Habermas to evaluate pedagogic justice’: Dr Monica McLean, Reader in Higher Education, School of Education, University of Nottingham  — Drawing on Jurgen Habermas’ critical theory, Monica will present a conceptualisation of university pedagogy, which constructs students as future citizens and emphasises the development of ‘communicative reason’ as a goal of university teaching .   She will then discuss whether such a conceptualization has any resonance with student perceptions of teaching and learning in university sociology departments, which are the focus of an ESRC-funded project ‘Quality and Inequality in university undergraduate degrees’.

‘Conceptualising the first year student experience: the dominance of the ‘transitions’ metaphor’: Dr Paul Ashwin, Lecturer in Post-compulsory Education, Lancaster University — In this seminar, Paul will argue that the literature on the first year experience in higher education has tended to conceptualise the first year experience in terms of the transition to higher education. Whilst this conceptualisation has obvious strengths, he argues that it tends to separate students’ experiences within higher education from their experiences prior to higher education. He will show how the choice of lens that it used to characterise particular educational processes can have significant implications for the outcomes of research and the focus of recommendations for policy and practice that are made on the basis of this research.

Network Convenors: Prof. Paul Blackmore (KCL) and Prof. Joëlle Fanghanel (Thames Valley University)

22nd September 2010

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

There is delegate fee for non-members is £25, and £20 for students

Details:

Email: srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk  Tel: 020 7447 2525 Fax: 020 7447 2526 Website: http://www.srhe.ac.uk

Nicola Manches

Administrative Assistant

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

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Antonio Gramsci

GRAMSCI, LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION

NEW BOOK!

Gramsci, Language and Translation (ed.) Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte 
Lexington Books, ISBN 978-0-7391-1860-3 Paper

http://www.lexingtonbooks.com 

“A significant body of scholarship already exists that illuminates the manner in which Gramsci’s views on language and translation inform his analyses of the relationship between politics and culture. Yet, Anglophone readers have remained generally unaware of this very important dimension of Gramsci’s thinking and writing, even though it features prominently in his elaboration of such key concepts as hegemony, common sense, and subalternity. Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte provide the perfect remedy by gathering in a single volume the seminal essays on the topic, including previously untranslated contributions by Tullio De Mauro, Franco Lo Piparo, Utz Maas, Derek Boothman, and Francisco Buey. Together with the recent publication of Gramsci’s translation notebooks, this timely volume will invigorate discussions on the intersections of language, politics, and culture.”– Joseph A. Buttigieg, University of Notre Dame

“In the crowded field of Gramsci studies, this is a gem of rare beauty. It provides an English readership with a wide-ranging introduction to an important set of insights, developed initially in Italy but taken up elsewhere, into Gramsci’s theory, methods, the key concept of hegemony, his approach to the language question, and more general issues of political strategy. The contributors are the key figures in this debate and, together, they productively highlight the role of arguments about language, philology, and translation for understanding Gramsci’s working methods and his theoretical and political conclusions. With a strong introduction and some excellent translations of earlier contributions, this book will enable readers to gain a better understanding of Gramsci’s place in Italian culture and politics as well as ideas about how to develop his arguments in their own work. I recommend this text wholeheartedly.”– Bob Jessop, Lancaster University

“This collection of essays inaugurates a new era of scholarly exchanges within and beyond the specialized fields of humanistic cultural studies. Expertly edited by Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte, Gramsci, Language, and Translation gathers the rigorous and provocative inquiries of an impressive array of international scholars crossing the traditional boundaries of political science, sociology, linguistics, translation studies, history, etc. It’s a historic event that, by way of opening up the Gramscian/Marxist canon, promises to renew critical thinking on the problems of global political economy while implicitly engaging protagonists in the urgent controversies on justice, human rights, religion, terrorism, race, ethnicity, immigration, and the post-9/11 ‘culture wars.’ A major scholarly achievement and an extremely valuable equipment for the civic intelligence of our troubled times” — E. San Juan, Jr., W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University, and director, Philippines Cultural Studies Center, Connecticut

Gramsci, Language, and Translation

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction-Translating Gramsci on Language, Translation, and Politics (Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte)

# Part I-Gramsci’s Linguistics and Gramsci’s Marxism

* Chapter 1-The Linguistic Roots of Gramsci’s Non-Marxism (Franco Lo Piparo)

* Chapter 2-Linguistics and Marxism in the Thought of Antonio Gramsci (Luigi Rosiello)

* Chapter 3-Language from Nature to History: More on Gramsci the Linguist (Tullio De Mauro)

* Chapter 4-Linguistics and the Political Question of Language (Stefano Gensini)

* Chapter 5-Gramsci the Linguist (Utz Maas)

* Chapter 6-Gramsci from One Century to Another (Interview with Edoardo Sanguineti by Giorgio Baratta)

# Part II-Language, Translation, Politics, and Culture

* Chapter 7-Translation and Translatability (Derek Boothman)

* Chapter 8-Aunt Alene on Her Bicycle: Antonio Gramsci as Translator from German and as Translation Theorist (Lucia Borghese)

* Chapter 9-On ‘Translatability’ in Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks (Fabio Frosini)

* Chapter 10-Translations and Metaphors in Gramsci (Maurizio Lichtner)

* Chapter 11-Translatability, Language, and Freedom in Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks (Rocco Lacorte)

# Part III-Politics, Theory, and Method

* Chapter 12-Language and Politics in Gramsci (Francisco F. Buey)

* Chapter 13-Gramsci’s Subversion of the Language of Politics (Anne Showstack Sassoon)

* Chapter 14-Some Notes on Gramsci the Linguist (Tullio De Mauro)

* Chapter 15-The Lexicon of Gramsci’s Philosophy of Praxis (André Tosel)

* Chapter 16-Subalternity and Language: Overcoming the Fragmentation of Common Sense (Marcus Green & Peter Ives)

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Capitalism

THE END OF CAPITALISM? REVOLUTION AND REPETITION

Tate Britain. Auditorium
Tuesday, 8 December 2009, 18.30–20.00

Kojin Karatani: ‘The End of Capitalism? Revolution and Repetition’
Capitalism may be on the verge of extinction, but it will not end by itself, because states do everything possible to prolong its life. Setting out from Marx’s discussion of repetition the The 18th Brumaire, this talk will outline a series of historical forms of repetition – repetition in the state, in capital and in revolution – and a new periodization of stages of capitalist development based on modes of exchange, in order to propose a new definition of the historical present.
Kojin Karatani is the author of Architecture as Metaphor (1995) and Transcritique: On Kant and Marx (2003) and a founder of the New Associationist Movement in Japan.

Peter Osborne, Professor of Modern European Philosophy, Middlesex University and an editor of the journal Radical Philosophy will act as Chair and Respondent.

The Auditorium, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1
£8 each talk (£6 concessions) or £25 for all 4 (£20 concessions)
Tate.org.uk/tickets or tel. 020-7887-8888

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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