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Stuart Hood

Stuart Hood

STUART HOOD (1915-2011)

CENTENARY DAY CONFERENCE

Open University in London and the South-East

1-11 Hawley Crescent

London NW1 8NP

(Near Camden Town tube on the Northern Line)

Saturday November 28

10.30 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.

We hope to provide coffee and tea and there will be a social space for discussion over lunch (not provided). There are takeway catering facilities nearby.

There is no conference fee.  But please register your attendance with Hilary Horrocks at: hilaryhorrocks@btinternet.com as the venue has a limited capacity.

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Stuart Hood, born in small-town NE Scotland in 1915, volunteered for army service in 1940 and was captured in the North African desert while stationed in Cairo with British Intelligence. He was released from an Italian prisoner of war camp at the time of the Armistice in September 1943 and, during an almost-year-long journey to meet the Allied advance, fought with Tuscan partisans, participating in the now semi-mythologised Battle of Valibona (January 1944). His memoir Pebbles from My Skull (1963), often republished, mainly as Carlino, is a classic reflection on his time in war-torn Italy. He worked for 17 years at the BBC, resigning in frustration from the position of Controller of Programmes, Television, in 1963, having been responsible for programmes such as Z-Cars and That Was the Week That Was. He made important documentaries including The Trial of [Soviet dissidents] Daniel and Sinyavsky; and was briefly Professor of Media Studies at the Royal College until asked to resign following his support for student protests. He latterly taught at the University of Sussex. He was a distinguished translator, particularly from German (including the poems of his great friend, Erich Fried) and Italian (including work by Dario Fo and Pier Paolo Pasolini). Returning to an earlier career as a fiction writer, he published a series of novels – A Storm from Paradise (1985), The Upper Hand (1987), The Brutal Heart (1989), A Den of Foxes (1991), and The Book of Judith (1995) – which draw on his Scottish childhood, his wartime experiences and his encounters with, amongst others, members of the Baader-Meinhof group. He joined the Communist Party as a student in Edinburgh but after the war was an anti-Stalinist socialist and briefly, in the 1970s, a member of the Workers Revolutionary Party. Influenced by the class-conscious trade unionists he had met in his university days, he was, also in the 1970s, an active Vice-President of the film and TV technicians’ union, ACTT.

Provisional conference programme follows …

 

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME (subject to amendment)

10.30 Arrival and Registration

10.45 Welcome, Terry Brotherstone and David Johnson

 

10.50-11.50 Session One

10.50 Showing of extracts from Stuart Hood’s documentary return to his childhood home, A View from Caterthun, with commentary by filmmakers Don Coutts and Christeen Winford.

11.20 Hilary Horrocks (freelance editor and independent researcher), ‘Stuart Hood, Partigiano – finding traces today in Emilio-Romagna and Tuscany’.

 

11.55-12.45 Session Two

11.55 Phil Cooke (University of Strathclyde), ‘The Italian Resistance: recent work on the historical context of Carlino’.

12.20 Karla Benske (Glasgow Caledonian University), ‘Showcasing the “compexity of human reactions”: an appreciation of Stuart Hood’s novels’.

 

12.45 Lunch

 

2.00-3.15 Session Three

2.00 Robert Lumley (University College, London), ‘Keeping Faith: revisiting interviews with Stuart Hood’.

2.25 Brian Winston (University of Lincoln) and Tony Garnett (film and TV director and producer), ‘Stuart Hood and the Media’.

3.15-3.30 Break

 

3.30-4.45 Session Four

3.30 David Johnson (Open University), ‘Stuart Hood, Scottish Literature and Scottish Nationalism’.

3.55 Haim Bresheeth (London School of Economics), ‘Working with Stuart on the Holocaust’.

4.20 Terry Brotherstone (University of Aberdeen) will lead a discussion on Stuart Hood’s politics, including his involvement in the 1970s with the Workers Revolutionary Party.

 

4.45-5.30 Session Five

4.45 Final reflections and future proposals.

5.15 Close.

5.30 Social gathering nearby.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/stuart-hood-1915-2011-centenary-day-conference-28-november

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Kevin Andersdon

Kevin Andersdon

THE CHARLIE HEBDO ASSASSINATIONS IN GLOBAL CONTEXT: FROM FRANCE TO THE MIDDLE EAST AND BEYOND

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2015

7:00-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

Mansoor M., Iranian cultural worker

Kevin Anderson, author of “Marx at the Margins”

 

On the one hand, the assassination of the editors of French satirical magazine “Charlie Hebdo” needs to be viewed in terms of the danger of ISIS and other radical Islamist groups bent on the destruction of the left and of secular democratic culture. These movements took the world stage with their hijacking of the Iranian revolution of 1979, followed a decade later by Ayatollah Khomeini’s fatwa against Anglo-Indian writer Salman Rushdie, himself from a Muslim background, for allegedly insulting Islam. On the other hand, the recent French events show the results of decades of segregation, discrimination, and police harassment/imprisonment of immigrants of Muslim background from the Middle East and North Africa, and of their descendants. These racist policies have been abetted by Islamophobic, anti-immigrant movements and ideologies. If radical Islamism is a new form of reactionary ideology that can undergird oppressive regimes in the Muslim world, the same is also true of Islamophobia in Europe and other regions, with both of these ideologies feeding on each other. As part of the Left, how can we break this vicious cycle?  How can we build upon the victory of the Kurds of Kobane, Syria against ISIS and that of the leftist Syriza Party in Greece in the face of efforts by a well-funded neofascist party that sought to blame immigrants for the crisis of capitalism?

 

Suggested background reading, available in English, Persian, and Spanish: Kevin Anderson, “The Paris Assassinations in Global Context,” International Marxist-Humanist, Jan. 12, 2015

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

 

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc. http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-charlie-hebdo-assassinations-global-context-france-middle-east-beyond

 

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN POLITICS, PUBLIC POLICY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

We welcome applications from excellent candidates for our MPhil/PhD programmes and our Masters by Research.

Areas of study

We supervise topics ranging across political science and international relations.  We particularly encourage students whose research interests will complement or extend our expertise in three general areas:

Critical Global Politics:

Including foreign policy, global media, regional governance, borders, politics and religion, international security, international law, human rights and migration, theorizing global cities and global political economy

Politics and Public Policy:

Including the politics of the EU, theories of the policy process, normative and critical political theory, British political issues and ideologies, environmental policy, competition policy and regulation

Cultural Politics, Communications and Media:

Including cultural politics, media culture and identity, media events and rituals, media and globalisation, communications and media, public service broadcasting, competition policy and regulation, copyright and new business models in the creative industries, new media and society, political communication, international communication, language and politics, interculturalism, and contemporary cultural and political theory.

More details, including on how to apply, can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/political-social-international-studies/research-degrees

Funding

We invite applications for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded doctoral studentships as partners in the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts Southeast England (CHASE) http://www.chase.ac.uk.  CHASE will be awarding up to 75 studentships in 2015.

The Faculty will also offer up to 15 University-funded PhD studentships available to students from within or outside the EU.

More information on studentships can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

To be considered for a studentship for October 2015 entry, the application deadline is 14 January 2015.  We advise early initial contact with potential supervisors to maximise the chance of success.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTDOCTORAL LECTURING FELLOWSHIP IN CULTURAL POLITICS, COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA

University of East AngliaSchool of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

Location: Norwich, Norfolk, UK

Salary: £24,775 to £30,434 per annum, pro rata

Hours: Part-time (65% Full-time Equivalent)

Contract: Contract/Temporary

Applications Close: 11th July 2014

Job Ref: ATS651

This fixed term, part-time post is designed to allow a postdoctoral student to develop teaching skills and experience, as well as to complete a programme of publications to advance their academic career. This post is open to postdoctoral students whose PhD was submitted or awarded between 1 August 2012 and 1 August 2014

You must be able to teach on core first-year modules and other modules as required, as well as to supervise undergraduate dissertations.

This part-time post (65%FTE) is available from 1 September 2014 to 30 June 2015.

We especially welcome applicants from women, ethnic minorities and other groups currently underrepresented among the academic staff at the University of East Anglia.

The University is a Bronze Athena Swan Award holder, currently working towards Silver

For further details see here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIZ643/postdoctoral-lecturing-fellowship-in-cultural-politics-communications-and-media/

University of East Anglia

  • No.1 for Student Experience (Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey 2013)
  • World top 1% (Times Higher Education World Rankings 2013)
  • World Top 100 (Leiden Ranking 2013)
  • UK Top 20 (Guardian University Guide 2014, Times Good University Guide 2014 and Complete University Guide 2014)
UEA

UEA

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

ARTISTIC LIVES

Kirsten Forkert, Birmingham City University

Tuesday February 25th @ University of Essex
3-5PM, Room LTB B
http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/news_and_seminars/seminarDetail.aspx?e_id=6277

Kirsten Forkert will talk about her recently published book, Artistic Lives (Ashgate 2013), which is based on interview material with artists and arts professionals in London and Berlin, together with ethnographic descriptions and analyses of social and urban policy. The book examines how artists support themselves within rapidly changing urban environments – and how they contend with the effects of property bubbles, precarious employment, uncertain funding and policies that position cultural workers at the centre of economic development with little concern for they actually make ends meet. The book examines the myth that artists can create something from nothing, and engages with debates surrounding Post-Fordism, gentrification and the nature of authorship, to raise challenging questions about the function of culture and the role of artists within contemporary capitalism.

Kirsten will discuss her motivations for starting the project, share the main findings of the research (which was carried out during the first phase of the recession) and reflect on the implications in the present context.

Kirsten Forkert is a researcher and activist, and lecturer in media theory at Birmingham City University. Prior to working at BCU, she taught at a number of institutions during and after completing her PhD in the department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths. Her work is based within cultural studies, but draws on other disciplines, including sociology, urban studies and critical theory. It has been published in CITY, Third Text and various edited collections, as well as in Mute and Variant. Prior to academia, she worked in media art, new media and community media in Canada and the US, as a freelance practitioner. She is now developing new research on the cultural politics of austerity, and is involved in a collaborative, ESRC funded project mapping the controversies around Home Office campaigns.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

This seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.

Further events this spring will include the Nanopolitics group (March 5th), Max Haiven from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (March 19th), Jeremy Gilbert from the University of East London (April 29th), and others.

For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Eisenstein

Eisenstein

CRITICAL THEORY, FILM AND MEDIA: WHERE IS “FRANKFURT” NOW?

Call for Papers: Permanent Seminar Conference 2014: Critical Theory, Film and Media: Where is “Frankfurt” Now?

Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt, DE, Aug. 20-24, 2014

Deadline for Papers: February 28th

This is an international conference at Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Germany, August 20 through 24, 2014, organized by the Institut für Sozialforschung and the Institut für Theater-, Film- und Medienwissenschaft in cooperation with the Permanent Seminar on Histories of Film Theories.

In 2010, Alexander Kluge releases a DVD called “Wer sich traut, reißt die Kälte vom Pferd” (Those who dare tear the cold down from his horse), the third installment in a series that started with a ten-hour film based on Eisenstein’s project of filming Marx’ “Das Kapital”. Picking up on an unfinished project developed with Adorno in 1967 on the theme of coldness, the 2010 DVD presents a media mix of 31 different types of short films and 41 stories in an accompanying booklet. The project is a collaboration between 12 artists, scholars and experts from various disciplinary backgrounds, two of them being fictive characters.  Reading theory has become a collaborative effort, involving various disciplines on different platforms, and dealing with unfinished projects. About the project Kluge writes:

“The possibility of a revolution in Europe has disappeared, and with it the confidence in a historical process that can be directlyshaped by people’s consciousness. With this confidence, a certain unrest and urgency have disappeared. … As if in a quiet garden we can now study strange thoughts from [x] and weird projects from [y], because they are like messages from an ideological antiquity. … We do not have to announce anything new, we do not have to pass final judgments, can change little and do not have to imitate [x] or [y]. One can see this as a goodbye, or as a beginning.”

Kluge then goes on to make a statement about Marx that we could paraphrase for our purposes in the following way: “The analytical instruments of the Frankfurt school are not outdated. … Sifting through the rubble of history we find useful tools.”

With a combination of social philosophy, philosophical aesthetics, political economics and a particular focus on technology the Frankfurt school and its kindred spirits Benjamin and Kracauer have paved the way for film and media studies as a critical discipline.

Now, at a time, when the generational project of 1968, the march through the institutions under the assumption that a revolution in Europe is possible, has largely run its course, it is time to sift through the rubble of history, collect the tools, pick up on unfinished projects and think about new beginnings.

What, then are the analytical instruments that the Frankfurt school provided that will be useful going forward? How did the Frankfurt School of critical theory shape the course of film and media theory in the 20th century, and how will its tools continue to shape the study and critical analysis of media and culture?

„Critical Theory, Film and Media: Where is ‘Frankfurt’ now?“, an international conference organized by the Institut für Sozialforschung and the Institut für Theater-, Film- und Medienwissenschaft in cooperation with the Permanent Seminar on Histories of Film Theories (filmtheories.org), proposes to address  these questions through a series of panels, keynote lectures and panel discussions.

Contributions are welcome on various aspects of critical theory, film and media, from the impact of critical theory on the history of film theory and media studies and film and media practice to debates about media and politics and the continuing relevance of critical theory to postcolonial, queer and other recent strands of cultural theory.

In particular, the conference proposes to address, but will not limit itself to, the following areas of study

From the critique of the culture industry to the “creative industries”: Without doubt the culture industry chapter of the “Dialectics of Enlightment” is among the most influential texts in the history of film and media theory. Together with Adorno’s notes on cinema in the “Minima moralia” this chapter constitutes a damning indictment of commercialized culture as exemplified most notably by Hollywood cinema. Among other things, with its strong focus on Hollywood, the “Culture industry” chapter laid the groundwork for the institutional histories of Hollywood proposed by the New Film History and continues to echo in current debates about creativity and the “creative industries”. One of the aims of this conference is to trace how the Frankfurt school critique of the culture industry has shaped the study of commercial and popular culture, but also to inquire into the possible continuing relevance of some of the basic tenets of Adorno and Horkheimer’s critique to digital network culture.

Essayism, Criticism and Critical Theory: In his famous essay on the “Essay as form” from 1958 Adorno argues for a kind of critical writing that strategically subverts and transgresses disciplinary boundaries. Going back even further, criticism constituted a crucial part of the project of critical theory since its beginnings, whether the film criticism of Kracauer or the music criticism of Adorno. One could argue that film studies emerged as a field in precisely the area carved out by Adorno – indebted to criticism, in a space in between disciplines, borrowing tools and approaches from neighboring field, avoiding for a long time the ossifications of disciplinary protocol. Emerging roughly a decade after film studies, “Medienwissenschaft” occupied a similar trans- or non-disciplinary space. Revisiting the Frankfurt legacy of criticism as theory and of disregarding disciplinary protocol this conference proposes to explore the power and potential of essaysism in the academic study of film and media culture today.

Philosophy of History and the History of Media: The Institut für Sozialforschung was created in response to a failed revolution, the German revolution of 1918. Combining Marx with Freud to explain why the revolution did not happen led the Frankfurt school to develop a theory of power and subjectivity of which Foucault later acknowledged that it would would have saved him a lot of trouble had he known about it earlier. The idea of history as process evolving around the possibility of a revolution remained central to later generations of critical theorists. From the outset, Kracauer and Benjamin in particular tied the question of historical process and historical consciousness to the question of media technology, in particular photography and film. In the wake of the emergence of digital network communications and the current transformation of moving image culture the positions the work of Benjamin and Kracauer have re-emerged as key reference in film and media theory. This conference proposes to explore why, even though the urgency that comes with a confidence in history as process has been lost, as Kluge argues, this work appears to be immediately relevant to the study of media and history in contemporary media culture.

Critical Theory, Feminist Film Theory and the Politics of Desire: One of the most important and powerful contributions of the Frankfurt School to the field of critical theory in the 20th century consisted in linking the critique of capitalism to sexual politics and the politics of desire. Drawing on the Frankfurt School’s signature combination of neo-marxist analysis with Freudian psychoanalysis, Herbert Marcuse discussed the capitalist system of production in terms of a sublimation of desire in his book 1955 “Eros and Civilization” that an important reference for the generation of 68. Feminist film theory, from Laura Mulvey onwards, emerged in the 1970s from a similar convergence of Freud and Marx (and from Althusser and Lacan), while later approaches to sexual politics and media, from gender studies to queer theory, owe a significant debt to Frankfurt school critical theory in their own ways, in particular to Kluge and Negt’s critique of Habermas’ concept of the public sphere, but also to Benjamin and Kracauer and their interest in the historically changes modes of mediated affect. One of the aims of this conference is to explore how the critique of capitalism and the analysis of sexual politics intersect and re-align in contemporary media culture and in the face of what has variously been called “information capitalism” or “digital capitalism”.

Critical Theory, Artistic Practice and the Category of the Art Work: Critical theory, from Benjamin’s works on the theater to his essay on the author as producer and the artwork essay to Kracauer’s film theory and Adorno’s sociology of music has left a significant imprint on film art and on media practice more broadly speaking. German experimental theater and radio in the 1920s, the television programs with avant-garde composes curated by Mauricio Kagel in the 1960s and 1970s and the new German cinema of Kluge and beyond all in varying degrees have use critical theory as a frame of reference. Jean-Luc Godard, a former critic who never ceased to be a critic, continues to acknowledge his debt to critical theory and to Benjamin and Adorno in particular in his work for cinema and television as does, of course, Kluge in his television work. Of particular interest in these examples is a critique of the category of “work” that can be traced back to Adorno but is probably now more relevant than ever. This conference proposes to trace the Frankfurt lineage of the critique of the category of art work across a variety of artistic and media practices.

Critical Theory and the Critique of Institutions: The Institut für Sozialforschung was created in the late 1920s as a research institution outside the university, even though it had ties with the University of Frankfurt, which itself had only been founded in 1914. Benjamin’s troubles with academic protocol are well known, and Kracauer consistently worked outside the university until very late in his life. Critical theory emerges outside of, or in tension with, the established institutions of academic life and carries the critique of institutions as its birthmark, so to speak. The Frankfurt school’s critique of institutions further extends to cultural institutions, from Benjamin’s critical analysis of Brecht and Brechtian theater to Adorno’s critique of the practices and institutions of classical music. One of the key legacies of the Frankfurt school is to keep the critique of institutions alive in film and media studies in areas where the focus tends to either be on representations of social and gender roles or on technologies regardless of their institutional dynamics.

Critical Theory and Gesture as Interruption: Few other concepts from early critical theory have developed a more virulent afterlife in the theory of theater, film and media than the concept of the “gesture”. Emerging from the theory of language and theater from his early essay on language an the book on the German “Trauerspiel” Benjamin defines “gesture” as a interruption of an action and as the “frozen dialectic” that later becomes a key to his theory of film and of the images, as well as to his readings of Kafka. Roland Barthes draws on Benjamin’s theory of gesture in his analysis of Eisenstein, as does Heiner Müller in his re-readings of Brecht, Jeff Wall in his tableaus or Godard in his “Histoire(s)”. This conference proposes to explore the prehistory and afterlife of this key concept of both critical theory and modern art theory.

Critical Theory and the History of Media Technology: Over the last few years a strain of Medienwissenschaft focused on the history technology and particularly computer technology has gained prominence in the Anglophone world under the label “German media theory”. Inspired mostly by the work of Friedrich Kittler and deriving from Heidegger rather than Adorno – or from Freiburg rather than Frankfurt –, this strain of media theory has proposed what we might call “Technohegelianism”, i.e. a philosophy of history as driven by technology and information technology in particular, as an alternative to a critical theory approach to media. This conference intends to explore the relative merits as well as the points of convergence and communication between “German media theory” and FrankfurtSchool critical theory, with a particular focus on the question of media technology.

The conference will be held at the Campus Westend, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt.

Proposals for papers and panels should be submitted to before February 28, 2014.

Notifications of acceptance will be sent out before March 15, 2014.

Scientific committee:

Dr. Sidonia Blättler, Institut für Sozialforschung, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Eva Geulen, professor of German literature, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Vinzenz Hediger, professor of cinema studies, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Axel Honneth, director of the Institut für Sozialforschung, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Rembert Hüser, professor of media studies, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Müller-Schöll, professor of theater studies, Frankfurt
Prof. Dr. Juliane Rebentisch, professor of philosophy and aesthetics, HFG Offenbach
Prof. Dr. Marc Ries, professor of media sociology, HFG Offenbach
Prof. Dr. Martin Seel, professor of philosophy, Frankfurt
Dr. Marc Siegel, assistant professor of cinema studies, Frankfurt

Information and Contact: info contact: frankfurtconference@filmtheories.org

See website: http://filmtheories.org/permanent-seminar-conference-2014-where-is-frankfurt-now/

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Tyrion Lannister

Tyrion Lannister

CRITICAL MEDIA LITERACY CONFERENCE

Call for Papers
Second Annual Critical Media Literacy Conference
March 22, 2014
8:00AM-4:00PM
Bone Student Center at Illinois State University
Normal, IL

Submit your proposal today!

Why Critical Media Literacy in the 21st Century?

Today, media culture is one of the most dominant forces in society. It contributes to how we define our sense of self and drives our understanding of the ‘Other.’ Media also perpetuates symbols, myths, and serves as a resource for generating a common culture. This multidisciplinary conference is designed to aid current educational leaders, future teachers, youth, and other concerned citizens in their understanding of the mass media and its impact on the events that shape our daily lives. Promoting critical media literacy is essential to excavating social inequalities and fostering participatory democracy during the 21st century.

We enthusiastically call for paper proposals that urgently and critically redefine, redirect, and recreate notions of knowledge, truth, and justice through (and with) critical media literacy and pedagogy. Paper proposals might address topics such as (but not limited to) the following:

• What are specific ways in which the corporate and political elite uses the mass media to promulgate their ideologies and practices?
• How does the mass media perpetuate divisions amongst social groups across the globe?
• How can teacher educators prepare future teachers by using critical media studies in teacher preparation programs?
• How can educators, youth, and concerned citizens provide more genuine representations of global citizens through their own media products?
• How has media literacy successfully fostered K-20 students’ critical engagement with mass media?
• How have various technologies employed by corporate conglomerates in the mass media been used to foster critical understanding and solidarity across the globe, rather than to promote conformity and corporatism?
• How can various critical theories enrich our understanding of the mass media in the age of neoliberalism?
• What are some ways in which media literacy can be applied to the new demands and concerns of today’s digitized culture?
• How might library scientists go about training critical media librarians?

Strand 1: Library Sciences
Papers in this strand will explore the existing or potential connection between library science and critical media inquiry.

Strand 2: Educational Foundations
Papers in this strand will explore interpretive, normative, and critical approaches to examining media. Papers that address critical pedagogy in online spaces are also highly desirable.

Strand 3: School of Communication
Papers in this strand will explore the relationships between communication scholarship and pedagogy and critical media literacy. Papers that examine the connections between communication, civic engagement, and media literacy are especially encouraged.

Strand 4: The Borg Center For Reading and Literacy
Papers in this strand will explore questions and and issues related to shifting definitions of literacy, critical media literacy, and potential new intersections of inquiry.

Key Dates
Call for papers opens: October 1, 2013
Proposal due date: January 7, 2014
Notification of accepted papers: February 1, 2014

Special Conference Registration Rates
Faculty: $90.00 (early bird rate until January 15, 2014). Then $110.00 from 1/16/14 to 3/10/2014.
Student: $45.00 (early bird rate until January 15, 2014). Then $60.00 from 1/16/14 to 3/10/2014.

Registration Options
On-line: Use your credit card to register at: www.conferences.illinoisstate.edu/CMLC
By Phone: (800) 877-1478 or (309) 438-2160, 8:00am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday using credit card payment
By Mail: Complete registration form and send with payment to:

CMLC
Illinois State University
Conference Services
Campus Box 8610
Normal, IL 61790-8610

By Fax: Fax completed registration form with credit card payment or P.O. to (309) 438-5364

Travel Lodging and Accommodations
Airport
Driving directions
Hotels

Keynote Address
William (Bill) Reynolds, Ed.D., teaches Education Foundations and Curriculum Studies at Georgia Southern University will be this year’s keynote. His talk is entitled, “The Monstrous Other: Exploring the Intersections of Youth Culture, Critical Media Literacy and Commodification in a Monster Making World.”

Published Proceedings
All papers will be published in the conference proceedings and will be open-access. A statement authorizing this publication is included in the submission agreement.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 10, April-June 2013

 

Anima Minima: Lyotard’s Monstrous Infancy…(k.locke)

Social Work Meets Cultural Studies: Art, Advocacy and Methods in Social Justice…(h.m.sloane)

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm

 


Intertheory Press, New Books:

 

Order now:

Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert – The Poetics of Radicality

by Gerry Coulter 

http://intertheory.org/gerrycoulter.htm

It is in the deserts of postmodernity where Baudrillard both found and left us. It is in these deserts that we become aware, as did Baudrillard and other poststructuralist thinkers, that theory precedes the world (there is nothing that can be said of the world that is not already framed by our approach to it). It is within Coulter’s absolutely lucid exploration – and it goes without saying that the work of Jean Baudrillard should be recognized in such an appropriate revelation – that Baudrillard’s thought is unveiled.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

Order now: 
Integral Reality 

by Robert Hassan and Nicholas Ruiz III

http://intertheory.org/ir.html

 

In this political, cultural and philosophical analysis, Hassan and Ruiz explore developing concepts of time, space and capital in relation to politics today.

About the Authors
Robert Hassan is a Media and Communications Research Fellow–University of Melbourne, Australia. His recent books include 27/7: Time and Temporality in the Network Society (Cambridge UP, 2007) and The New Media Theory Reader (Open UP, 2006)

 

Nicholas Ruiz III, Ph.D was born in New York City in 1970. He is the author of The Metaphysics of Capital and America in Absentia. He is also the editor of Kritikos.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones

NEW FORMATIONS 77

BERNARD STIEGLER: TECHNICS, POLITICS, INDIVIDUATION

New Formations 77
… is out now at: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contents.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

AVAILABLE FREE ONLINE:

Editorial: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf77%20edit.pdf?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

Interview with Bernard Stiegler by Ben Roberts, Jeremy Gilbert and Mark Hayward:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf77%20interview.pdf?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:
Ben Roberts on Stiegler’s challenge to media theory
Stephen Barker on a critical politics of re-individuation
Mark B. N. Hansen on technics and the temporal object
Judith Wambacq and Bart Buseyne on real time
Bram Leven on aesthetics in Stiegler
Patrick Crogan on editing individuation
Marcel Swiboda on mnemotechnics and orthographic temporal objects
John Hutnyk on proletarianisation
Oliver Marchart on antagonism and technicity

MORE ON THIS ISSUE:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf77.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

SUBSCRIPTIONS:
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/orders.html?utm_source=emailhosts&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2013-03-06_NF77

NB: THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION TO BE CONSIDERED FOR THE NEXT UNTHEMED ISSUE OF NEW FORMATIONS (PUBLICATION NOVEMBER 2013) IS MARCH 31ST, 2013.  SEE: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.html

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Books

Books

ONLY CONNECT …

A Call for Chapters for an upcoming book … feel free to be creative with the formats!

The book is:

Only Connect … discovery pathways, library explorations, and the information adventure

A collection of information discovery journeys.
Andrew Walsh & Emma Coonan
A call for chapter submissions for an anarcho-narrative book about Information Discovery Journeys.
Full details on http://innovativelibraries.org.uk/onlyconnect/

Learning is about creating relationships between entities and establishing a narrative that makes sense of the world

Research is about juxtaposing entities that were previously unrelated

The book will consist of a series of narratives connected by the over arching theme of information discovery journeys. The authors of the individual chapters are free to decide the most appropriate structure to tell these stories about information discovery, whether that is traditional textual formats, more free form text (e.g. transcripts of social media interactions; poetry; illustrative fictional prose), through images, video, or whatever media seems appropriate to the author.

The text will be electronic by default, available freely under CC license (see note http://innovativelibraries.org.uk/index.php/onlyconnect/#Note). Print on demand versions will be made available if deemed appropriate when editing the finished text.

Contributors will be selected by the editors after submitting a proposal to the call for papers. Final submissions will be subject to the lightest possible editing, in conjunction with the author, to insure the integrity of the original submission is maintained.

Please send a title and short description (around 200 words) of the chapter you propose to the editors at: infojourneys@innovativelibraries.org.uk <mailto:infojourneys@innovativelibraries.org.uk>

Include the topics you would cover, the structure your chapter would take and any special format or structure your contribution would require. We’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

Timescales:
Call for Papers ends 1st March
First Drafts due 1st June
Book published Autumn 2013

Bypassing established publisher routes means that our ‘unbook’ can be:
*         Creative Commons licensed, giving contributors recognition and making the material immediately free and sharable online
*         Multimedia – contributors pick their preferred format: prose, video, images, Storify’d tweets, graphs, data … (print-on-demand an option for textual parts, linking to additional non-textual material via an app such as Aurasma. Details of this to be confirmed at a later date.)
*         Free of the writing conventions imposed by traditional publishers – contributors can retain their own voice, choose the length of their contribution, use whatever format they prefer

Note on licensing: We will ask authors / contributors to sign a simple agreement to allow us rights to publish their contribution and to permit others to use the contents of the book under CC licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Contributors will retain copyright over their work.
Regards
Andrew
Andrew Walsh MSc MCLIP FHEA
Academic Librarian, University Teaching Fellow, National Teaching Fellow
Music, Humanities, Media, Education and Professional Development.
Information Literacy Practitioner of the Year, 2012

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Dialectics

Dialectics

COMMUNICATION, CRISIS, CRITIQUE AND CHANGE

Call for Abstracts by Research Network 18 – Sociology of Communications and Media Research: Communication, Crisis, Critique and Change

Coordinator: Christian Fuchs christian.fuchs@ut.at
Communication, Crisis, Critique and Change
http://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18
https://www.facebook.com/events/450441271689391/

Abstracts should not exceed 1750 characters (including spaces, approximately 250 words). Each paper session will have the duration of 1.5 hours. Normally sessions will include 4 papers.

For submission, please use the form that shows up when clicking on the links next to the session titles onhttp://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18

Abstracts can only be submitted online no later than 1st of February 2013 to the submission platform hosted on the conference website. Abstracts sent by email cannot be accepted.

ESA RN18 focuses in its conference stream on the discussion of how crisis, critque and societal changes shape the study of media, communication & society today. The overall questions we want to address are:
* Which crises (including the fnancial and economic crisis of capitalism, global wars and conflicts, ecological crisis, the crisis of democracy, legitimation crisis, etc) are we experiencing today and how do they influence media and communication in contemporary society?
* What are the major changes of society, the media, and communication that we are experiencing today?
* What forms of political critique (political movements) and academic critique (critical studies, critical media sociology, critical theory, etc) are emerging today and are needed for interpreting and changing media, communication and society?

ESA RN18 is calling for both general submissions on “Communicaton, Crisis, Critique and Change” that address these questions as wellas more specific submissions that address a number of specific session topics. For detailed session descriptions, please see: http://www.esa11thconference.eu/call-for-papers/research-networks/RN18

01RN18. Capitalism, Communication, Crisis & Critique Today
This session focuses on how to critically study the connection of capitalism and communication in times of crisis.

02RN18. Communication, Crisis and Change in Europe
This session focuses on media and communicaton in Europe in times of crisis and change. We are especially interested in presentations that cover Europe as a whole and go beyond single-country studies

03RN18. Knowledge Labour in the Media and Communication Industries in Times of Crisis

04RN18. Critical Social Theory and the Media: Studying Media, Communication and Society Critically

05RN18. Sociology of Communications and Media Research (open)

06JS18. RN18 Joint session with RN06 Critical Political Economy
Critical Political Economy of the Media and Communication in Times of Capitalist Crisis and Change
(Chairs: Ian Bruff & Christian Fuchs)

18JS29. RN18 Joint session with RN29 Social Theory
Social Theory and Media Sociology Today
(Chairs: George Pleios and Csaba Szalo)

 

First published: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-abstracts-by-research-network-18-sociology-of-communications-and-media-research-communication-crisis-critique-and-change.-esa-conference-turin-28-31-august-2013

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

JOURNEYS ACROSS MEDIA

Journeys Across Media (JAM)

The Body and The Digital

Friday 19th April 2013, University of Reading

2013 will mark the 11th anniversary of the annual Journeys Across Media (JAM) Conference for postgraduate students, organised by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. JAM 2013 seeks to focus on and foster current research relating to the Body and the Digital, as today they are interactive and interdependent facets in the media of film, theatre and television; and more widely, in the areas of performance and art. It is a relationship which continues to develop and redefine cinematic, televisual and theatrical practices.

French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty once stated: “The body is our general medium for having a world.” Today, the world of live and screened performance are perceived and received differently, due to the body’s relationship with the digital. Approaches and practices of phenomenology, embodiment, the haptic and the experiential are being re-examined as they continue to encounter digital culture in new ways. Representations and experiences of embodiment are often integral dynamics of theatre, television, film and television, and are preoccupations that can be explored through diverse media or digital influences.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses and practices relating to the Body and the Digital, to submit papers or practice-based research for the JAM 2013 Conference. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

-Interactivity between Digital languages and the Body

-Sonic Representations of the Body in Digital Performance

-The Digitized Body in Performance

-The Role of the Body in Digital Games and Virtual Performance

-Post-Colonial Bodies in the Contemporary Moment

-Preparing the Body for Performance

-Notions of Embodiment (i.e. Violent, Disabled, Explicit)

-Traditions of Corporeally focused Film, Theatre and Television

-Embodied Spectatorship or Audiences, and Physicality

-Phenomenology of the Lived, Performed and Screened Body

-The Haunted Body

-Politics of the Body

-Unconventional and Other Bodies

The body, its presence, perceptions and experience, are becoming increasingly underpinned and influenced by the digital age. JAM 2013 will endeavour to open a dialogue about the relationship between the body and digital in contemporary scholarship and practice, posing many questions including: How does the body encounter digital media and how do digital media frames position the body – both in mainstream iterations, social media contexts and in art/installation/performance contexts? Furthermore, it will also be worth considering how digital technology has affected the way that humans approach unfamiliar body movement traditions, beyond regional and national borders?  

JAM 2013 will provide a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed this opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of their development, while having the opportunity to meet and form contacts with fellow postgraduate students. Furthermore, participants at JAM 2013 have the possibility of being published in the Journal of Media Practice.

Non-Presenting delegates are also very welcome to attend this conference.

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: 1st February 2013

Please send a 250-word abstract for a fifteen minute paper and a 50-word biographical note to Johnmichael Rossi, Gary Cassidy, Edina Husanovic, Shelly Quirk, Matthew McFrederick at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

 

CALL FOR PRACTICE-BASED WORK deadline: 1st February 2013

Continuing from the success of last year’s JAM 2012 Conference: Time Tells, which experimented with conference structure to include live performances, film screenings and installations taking place throughout the day, we invite artists working in various mediums to propose presentations of their work, relevant to the conference theme.

Please send a 250-word outline describing the piece you are proposing to present, as well as duration and any specific technical/space requirements, and a 50-word biographical note. Relevant images and links to your work would also be helpful. As outlined above please e-mail the Conference organisers at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk.

 

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at Reading and the Standing Conference of University Drama Departments.

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski