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Radical Thinkers

Radical Thinkers

RADICAL THINKERS SERIES SET 7 – PLUS EVENTS AT THE ICA

NEW FROM VERSO:

RADICAL THINKERS SERIES: SET 7

Alain Badiou / Jean Baudrillard / Simon Critchley / Ludwig Feuerbach / Maurice Godelier / André Gorz / Max Horkheimer / Fredric Jameson / Karl Korsch / Wilhelm Reich / Valentin Voloshinov / Slavoj Zizek

Published March 2013
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AN INTRODUCTION TO RADICAL THINKERS
A series of events at the ICA. See below.
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“A compendium of left-wing philosophical and political thought, inoculating it against the ‘great idea’ of philosophy-as-self-help. As a way of transforming… formless disgust into educated critique, these books are a fine, cheap and decidedly elegant starting point.” Owen Hatherley, http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/radical-thought/

“An extremely pleasant surprise: a new imprint from Verso called RADICAL THINKERS, and a pile of white-covered paperbacks by the likes of Theodor Adorno, Fredric Jameson, Guy Debord and Walter Benjamin. Not only do they have nifty cover designs, they are, for Verso, ridiculously cheap.” Nick Lezard, GUARDIAN http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/aug/15/jean-baudrillard-transparency-of-evil
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Since 1970 Verso has published the work of radical thinkers from Jacques Lacan and Jean-Paul Sartre to Fredric Jameson, Walter Benjamin, Louis Althusser, Judith Butler, and many more. The RADICAL THINKERS series of beautifully designed and affordable editions of classic works of theory now exceeds 80 published titles.

The new SET 7 features essential texts in philosophy and cultural theory, from selected writings of Ludwig Feuerbach to Simon Critchley’s seminal text INFINITELY DEMANDING.

For information on each book or to buy a copy visit the link after each title below. All of the titles are available together as a single shrink-wrapped set at a reduced price. For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/5-radical-thinkers
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RADICAL THINKERS SET 7:

ETHICS: AN ESSAY ON THE UNDERSTANDING OF EVIL by Alain Badiou

ISBN: 9781781680186 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 224 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1136-ethics

THE SPIRIT OF TERRORISM by Jean Baudrillard

ISBN: 9781781680209 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 112 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1197-the-spirit-of-terrorism

INFINITELY DEMANDING by Simon Critchley

ISBN: 9781781680179 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 176 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1135-infinitely-demanding

THE FIERY BROOK: SELECTED WRITINGS by Ludwig Feuerbach

ISBN: 9781781680216 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 320 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1199-the-fiery-brook

RATIONALITY AND IRRATIONALITY IN ECONOMICS by Maurice Godelier

ISBN: 9781781680254 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 368 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1140-rationality-and-irrationality-in-economics

CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, ECOLOGY by André Gorz

ISBN: 9781781680261 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 160 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1134-capitalism-socialism-ecology

CRITIQUE OF INSTRUMENTAL REASON by Max Horkheimer

ISBN: 9781781680230 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 180 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1138-critique-of-instrumental-reason

A SINGULAR MODERNITY by Fredric Jameson

ISBN: 9781781680223 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 250 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1200-a-singular-modernity

MARXISM AND PHILOSOPHY by Karl Korsch

ISBN: 9781781680278 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 176 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1141-marxism-and-philosophy

SEX-POL: ESSAYS, 1929-1934 by Wilhelm Reich

ISBN: 9781781680247 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 416 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1139-sex-pol

FREUDIANISM by Valentin Voloshinov

ISBN: 9781781680285 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 176 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1142-freudianism

WELCOME TO THE DESERT OF THE REAL by Slavoj Zizek

ISBN: 9781781680193 / Paperback / $17.95 / £9.99 / $19CAN / 160 Pages http://www.versobooks.com/books/1137-welcome-to-the-desert-of-the-real

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AN INTRODUCTION TO RADICAL THINKERS at the ICA, 9 April – 4 June

To launch this new set, Verso is proud to present AN INTRODUCTION TO RADICAL THINKERS: a fortnightly series of events held at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), London. They are designed to take theory outside of the academy to create a public forum for the discussion of sophisticated ideas.

Led by engaging speakers to steer the potential of such debate far away from the safe confines of ‘philosophy- as-self-help’ to more provocative and radical horizons, the events aim to interrogate our existing understandings of all areas of life, including: sexuality, economics, faith, politics and the individual.

For the full details of these events, including booking information, visit the link next to the title of each event below.

9 April: Nina Power presents THE FIERY BROOK by Ludwig Feuerbach
http://www.ica.org.uk/36885/Talks/Radical-Thinkers-Nina-Power-on-Fiery-Brook-by-Ludwig-Feuerbach.html

23 April: Federico Campagna presents INFINITELY DEMANDING by Simon Critchley
http://www.ica.org.uk/36890/Talks/Radical-Thinkers-Federico-Campagna-on-Infinitely-Demanding-by-Simon-Critchley.html

7 May: Esther Leslie presents CRITIQUE OF INSTRUMENTAL REASON by Max Horkheimer
http://www.ica.org.uk/36901/Talks/Radical-Thinkers-Esther-Leslie-on-Critique-of-Instrumental-Reason-by-Max-Horkheimer.html

21 May: Peter Hallward presents ETHICS by Alain Badiou
http://www.ica.org.uk/36892/Talks/Radical-Thinkers-Peter-Hallward-on-Ethics-by-Alain-Badiou.html

4 June: Stella Sandford presents SEXPOL by Wilhelm Reich
http://www.ica.org.uk/36896/Talks/Radical-Thinkers-Stella-Sandford-on-Sexpol-by-Wilheim-Reich.html

For details on all events, visit: http://www.ica.org.uk/36884/Seasons/An-Introduction-to-Radical-Thinkers.html

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For more information on the RADICAL THINKERS series or to buy the books visit: http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/5-radical-thinkers

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-verso-radical-thinkers-series-set-7-plus-events-at-the-ica

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Theodor Adorno

Theodor Adorno

MARX AND THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL – CALL FOR PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

6TH INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL THEORY CONFERENCE OF ROME

Stream on Marx and the Frankfurt School: New Perspectives and their Contemporary Relevance

May 6-8, 2013

John Felice, Rome Center of Loyola University Chicago

Recent years have seen a flourishing of new perspectives on the contemporary relevance of Karl Marx’s thought. Very little of this thought has been applied to the relationship between Marx and the work of the Frankfurt School. Instead much of the work on Marx and the Frankfurt School is still approached through paradigms such as the Marxist Humanist discourse of alienation or of scholarly interpretations established by Jurgen Habermas, Martin Jay and Gillian Rose. This stream aims to bring together the best contemporary scholarship offering new perspectives on the relationship between Marx and the FrankfurtSchool and to consider the contemporary relevance of this relationship.

Possible topics include:

·      New assessments of the relationship between Marx and major figures from the Frankfurt School including Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Marcuse, Habermas and Honneth.

·      New assessments of the relationship between Marx and minor figures from the Frankfurt School including: Sohn-Rethel, Kracauer, Kirchheimer, Löwenthal Neumann, Pollack, Wittfogel, Negt, Kluge, Schmidt, Backhaus, Reichelt.

 ·      Comparative accounts of different figures from the Frankfurt School’s interpretation of Marx.

 ·      New assessments of theories central to Marx and thinkers from the Frankfurt School such as critique, society, reification, second nature, natural history, commodification, fetishism, value, money, exchange, equivalence, ideology, domination, class, capital, social reproduction, epistemology, subjectivity etc.

 ·      New assessments of the reception and the influence of the Frankfurt School’s relation to Marx in national and international contexts.

 ·      Importance that the ideas of Marx and the Frankfurt School have for contemporary theories of capital, social domination, subjectivity, the state, epistemology, class, critical pedagogy, emancipatory politics, and issues of crisis, social reproduction, ecological catastrophe etc.

 ·      Criticisms different Marxisms or critical theories might have of thinkers from the FrankfurtSchool.

 ·      Criticisms the thinkers from the FrankfurtSchool might have of Marx and different Marxisms.

 ·      Productive and elective affinities between Marx, figures from the Frankfurt School and other Marxists such as Bataille, Bensaid, Foucault, Open Marxism, Althusser, Heinrich, Kurz, Dieter Wolf, Castoriadis, Illyenkov, Bogdanov, etc.

 ·      Productive and elective affinities between Marx, figures from the Frankfurt School and other Marxist schools such as Autonomism, Political Marxism, Open Marxism, communisation and value-form theory.

 

If you are interested in presenting a paper or organizing a panel (of up to 5 speakers), please submit a 1-2 page abstract by February 28, 2013 (including name and institutional affiliation). Abstracts should be submitted by email to the stream coordinator Chris O’Kane at theresonlyonechrisokane@gmail.com

Decisions regarding the program will be made by March 2013.

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-stream-on-marx-and-the-frankfurt-school-new-perspectives-and-their-contemporary-relevance-1

 

**END**

 

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Aesthetics

CRITICAL THEORY AND THE ARTS – NEW YORK

School of Visual Arts
MA Program in Critical Theory and the Arts

“What Where” Spring Lecture Series

Sven Lütticken
Autonomy After the Fact
Wednesday, February 29, 6:30 p.m.
136 West 21st Street, Room 220-F
svenlutticken.blogspot.com [http://svenlutticken.blogspot.com/]

RESCHEDULED:

Paul Chan
On Not Working
NEW DATE:
Thursday, March 15, 6:30 p.m.
136 West 21st Street, Room 220-F
nationalphilistine.com [http://www.nationalphilistine.com/]

What Where lectures are open to the public. Further details at cta.sva.edu
[http://cta.sva.edu/program-announcements-biblioteca-department-resources/]

School of Visual Arts
209 East 23 Street, New York, NY 10010-3994
Tel: 212.592.2172
E-mail: [theoryart@sva.edu] Fax: 212.592.2168

***END***

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Theodor Adornon

5th INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL THEORY CONFERENCE OF ROME

CALL FOR PAPERS
5TH INTERNATIONAL CRITICAL THEORY CONFERENCE OF ROME

May 7-9, 2012
John Felice Rome Center of Loyola University Chicago

The John Felice Rome Center of Loyola University Chicago is hosting the fifth international conference on Critical Theory of Rome, which will be held at its campus in Rome, Italy – Via Massimi 114/A.

The conference will examine the importance and the developments of the Frankfurt School by addressing both the philosophical tradition of the early stages of Critical Theory – and in particular the works of Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, Max Horkheimer and Herbert Marcuse – as well as the application of their theories to our contemporary society.

In order to reflect the wide range of topics addressed by Critical Theory, the conference will cover different aspects of philosophical reflection on justice, politics, aesthetics, sociology, technology,  literature and any other relevant field of study.

The conference will be held at the Rome Center of Loyola University Chicago on May 7-9, 2012.  It will begin on Monday morning and end by Wednesday afternoon (with a welcoming reception on the evening of Sunday, May 6).  During the sessions, each speaker will have 30 minutes. All presentations will be made in English.

Coordinator: Stefano Giacchetti Ludovisi, Loyola University Chicago, JFRC

Keynote speakers:
Idit Dobbs-Weinstein, Vanderbilt University
Andrew Feenberg, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver
Alessandro Ferrara, University of Rome, Tor Vergata
James Gordon Finlayson, University of Sussex
Stefano Petrucciani, University of Rome, La Sapienza
Henry Pickford, University of Colorado, Boulder
David Schweickart, Loyola University Chicago

If you are interested in presenting a paper or organizing a panel (of up to 5 speakers), please submit a 1-2 page abstract by February 2, 2012 (including name, eventual institutional affiliation and mailing 
address).  Abstracts should be submitted by email.  Decisions regarding the program will be made by the end of February 2012.

To submit an abstract, or for more information, contact: Stefano Giacchetti Ludovisi, PhD – stefano.giacchetti@tiscali.it ; Tel: (+39) 06-81905467

Conference fees: 80 Euro; Free for undergraduate students.

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Theodor Adorno

THE ACTUALITY OF ADORNO – CONFERENCE AND CALL FOR PAPERS

*****Call for Papers******

‘The Actuality of Adorno: Theatre, Performance, and the Culture Industry Reconsidered (again)’

The PSi Performance and Philosophy working group

@ Performance Studies international #18

University of Leeds,UK

27 June – 1 July 2012

 

Invitation to contribute to a panel organised by the ‘Performance and Philosophy Working Group’

‘The Actuality of Adorno: Theatre, Performance, and the Culture Industry Reconsidered (again)’

 

The aim of this panel is to revisit and interrogate Theodor W. Adorno’s seminal critique of the ‘culture industry’, which he articulated in his collaborative work with Max Horkheimer (Dialectic of Enlightenment) as well as in numerous studies of cultural criticism that explore the status of art in the administered world of advanced capitalism.

We invite paper presentations that pursue Adornian perspectives and compositional stylistics in order to re-engage with his dialectical critique of the culture industry through specific sentences, phrases, and ideas composed by Adorno himself. As such, we ask that those interested in contributing to this panel build a paper around a specific Adorno quotation that deals with the culture industry. Or, in other words, we ask that proposals treat Adorno quotations as fragments through which to re-view the workings of the culture industry as it extends into the realms of theatre and performance in the present.

You may choose from one of the following quotations or select your own from Adorno’s body of work.

 

From: ‘Culture and Administration’, Adorno: The Culture Industry, trans. Rolf Tiedmann (New York: Routledge, 1991).

‘Through the sacrifice of its possible relation to praxis, the cultural concept itself becomes an instance of organization; that which is so provokingly useless in culture is transformed into tolerated negativity or even into something negatively useful—into a lubricant for the system, into something which exists for something else, into untruth, or into goods of the culture industry calculated for the consumer. All this is registered today in the uncomfortable relation between culture and administration’ (117).

 

From: ‘Cultural Criticism and Society’, Prisms; Also in Critical Theory: A Reader, ed. Douglas Tallack (1995). The page numbers below refer to this edition:

‘Cultural criticism shares the blindness of its object.’ (291)

‘The dialectical critic of culture must both participate in culture and not participate. Only then does he do justice to his object and to himself.’ (296).

 

From: Aesthetic Theory, trans. Robert Hullot-Kentor (London: The Athlone Press, 1997):

‘The consumer arbitrarily projects his impulses – mimetic remnants – on whatever is presented to him. Prior to total administration, the subject who viewed, heard, or read a work was to lose himself, forget himself, extinguish himself in the artwork. The identification carried out by the subject was ideally not that of making the artwork like himself, but rather that of making himself like the artwork.

This identification constituted aesthetic sublimation; Hegel named this comportment freedom to the object. He thus paid homage to the subject that becomes subject in spiritual experience through self-relinquishment, the opposite of the philistine demand that the artwork give him something.’ (17)

‘The poles of the artwork’s deaestheticization are that it is made as much a thing among things as a psychological vehicle of the spectator. What the reified artworks are no longer able to say is replaced by the beholder with the standardized echo of himself, to which he hearkens.’ (17)

 

From: Negative Dialectics, trans. E.B. Ashton (1973): ‘All post-Auschwitz culture, including its urgent critique, is garbage….Whoever pleads for the maintenance of this radically culpable and shabby culture becomes its accomplice, while the man who says no to culture is directly furthering the barbarism which our culture showed itself to be’ (367).

‘The power of the status quo puts up the façades into which our consciousness crashes. It must seek to crash through’ (17).

‘Direct communicability to everyone is not a criterion of truth. We must resist the all but universal compulsion to confuse the communication of knowledge with knowledge itself, and to rate it higher, if possible—whereas at present each communicative step is falsifying truth and selling it out’ (41).

 

From ‘Culture Industry Reconsidered’ in Adorno: Essays on the Culture Industry (Routledge)

‘The masses are not the measure but the ideology of the culture industry, even though the culture industry itself could scarcely exist without adapting to the masses’ (99).

‘The autonomy of works of art, which of course rarely ever predominated in an entirely pure form, and was always permeated by a constellation of effects, is tendentially eliminated by the culture industry, with or without the conscious will of those in control’ (19).

‘The concept of technique in the culture industry is only in name identical with technique in works of art. In the latter, technique is concerned with the internal organization of the object itself, with its inner logic. In contrast, the technique of the culture industry is, from the beginning, one of distribution and mechanical reproduction, and therefore always remains external to its object’ (101).

 

Please send a 350-word abstract (including your affiliation and technical requirements) to the session organisers Will Daddario w.daddario@gmail.com and Karoline Gritzner kgg@aber.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals: Friday 7th October 2011

Please note that, as usual, the panel as a whole will still have to be submitted to the PSi 18 conference organizers – so even if session organizers accept your proposal, this is not a guarantee of participation in PSi 18.

 

Performance & Philosophy Working Group (PPWG) wiki: http://psi-ppwg.wikidot.com/

Performance Studies International (PSi) website: http://psi-web.org/

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Herbert Marcuse

THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL AND MARXIST-HUMANISM

THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL AND MARXIST-HUMANISM: RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA’S DIALOGUE WITH HERBERT MARCUSE AND ERICH FROMM AS A WINDOW ON MARXISM IN AMERICA

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011
2:00-4:00 PM
Community Room A, Westside Pavilion, Los Angeles
(Westside Pavilion is at Pico & Westwood Boulevards; Community Room A is on east side of the mall, third floor, behind food court; 3 hrs. free parking in mall lot)

Speakers:
Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins
Kelly Green, student activist

Changes in technology and in the overall structure of modern capitalism – as well as debates over dialectics — were at the center of an important dialogue among Marxists in the U.S.  The discussion took place between the Marxist-Humanist and feminist philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya and the philosopher Herbert Marcuse and the social psychologist Erich Fromm, both formerly of the Frankfurt School. Their dialogue is manifested in books such as Marcuse’s One-Dimensional Man, Fromm’s Marx’s Concept of Man, and Dunayevskaya’s Philosophy and Revolution, and in their correspondence, which is to be published in book form next year.

Suggested readings:
1. Kevin Anderson, “A Preliminary Exploration of the Dunayevskaya-Marcuse Dialogue (with excerpts from their correspondence and comments by Douglas Kellner): http://www.kevin-anderson.com/preliminary-exploration-dunayevskayamarcuse-dialogue-1954-79-excerpts-correspondence-comments-douglas-kellner/
2. Kelly Green, “Technology, Labor, and the Transcendence of Capital: Revisiting the Marcuse-Dunayevskaya Debate”, in: http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/technology-labor-transcendence-capital-revisiting-marcusedunayevskaya-debate-kelly-green/
3. Raya Dunayevskaya, “The ‘Automaton’ and the Worker,” in Philosophy and Revolution, pp. 68-76
4. Herbert Marcuse, “The New Forms of Control,” Ch. 1 of One-Dimensional Man, at: http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/marcuse/works/one-dimensional-man/ch01.htm

Future meeting (same time and location):
October 8 (date tentative): On the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War: Marx’s writings on race, class, and slavery before and during the Civil War.

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/
Mail to: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

RETHINKING 1968

Call for Papers
“Rethinking 1968”
PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture
Special Issue

The events of 1968 shook the world. On the 40th anniversary > of the protests in France, Germany and the United States, the EPTC organized a series of panels to investigate these industrial and student actions, and whether they can serve as a basis for critiquing our current political climate. We want to ask if the philosophical underpinnings of these revolutionary acts have continued relevance today.

For example, in France, the French phenomenologist and existentialist, turned Marxist, Jean-Paul Sartre was held up as one of the intellectuals who could provide an intellectual basis for the revolution. Alongside structuralists like Althusser, Sartre was viewed as an intellectual god-father of the movement, not only because of his writings critical of capitalism and the bourgeois system, be they his early writings on existentialism, or his later reformulation of Marxism in the Critique of Dialectical Reason, nor because he linked left-wing activism in the first world with support for the oppressed elsewhere, but because he was willing to lend his name and support to the Maoists against the Gaullist government.

Similarly, in Germany, two philosophers, the phenomenologically-inspired and Marxist Herbert Marcuse and the neo-Marxist and member of the Frankfurt School Jürgen Habermas were central figures for the student revolutionaries. As a member of the Frankfurt School’s second generation, Habermas was viewed by the students as safely removed from the alleged post-World War II conservatism of Adorno and Horkheimer. For the first several years following its publication, Habermas’s habilitation thesis, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, was a text central to the student struggle in Germany. Similarly, Marcuse’s texts, Reason and Revolution, Eros and Civilization, and One-Dimensional Man, as well as his occasional writings, were used as rallying cries by the left both in Europe and in the United States.

The question we propose for this volume is: what relevance do these philosophers’s works have today, in light of the continued expansion of the capitalist system, and the fact that student leaders like Daniel Cohn-Bendit, Bernard Kouchner, and Joschka Fischer have renounced extra-political activities and joined the political mainstream? We are interested in papers that explore the relevance of the philosophical critiques that inspired the movements of 1968 for present day radical politics, including papers that use the philosophical inspirations behind 1968:

(1) To critique global capitalism while providing a positive way forward,
(2) To examine American hegemony,
(3) To examine possibilities for overturning existing political structures in either the developed or developing world,
(4) To examine issues surrounding the environment or environmental justice,
(5) Or any other topic, provided that the paper deals extensively with the philosophical ideas of 1968 and their relevance for today’s changed political landscape.

Interested authors should submit a copy of their paper in RTF or WORD format to PhaenEx’s website: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

Queries should be sent to Kevin W. Gray at: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca

The submission deadline is July 1, 2009.

Contact: Kevin W. Gray, Faculté de Philosophie, Université Laval,Québec, QC G1K 7P4, Canada. Phone: +1 845 228.8548, Skype: kevinwgray, Email: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca
Web: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

 

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