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Walter Benjamin

THE CONCEPT OF EDUCATIVE EXPERIENCE IN WALTER BENJAMIN’S CRITICAL THEORY

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Talk by Matthew Charles (University of Westminster)

At the UCL Institute of Education

20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL

Wednesday, 19th July 2019

5.00pm – 7.15pm

Room 828

 

Free

Open to All

No booking required

 

Organised by Judith Suissa for the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB), London Branch

 

Following a revival of interest in a theory and practice of learning influenced by the critical theory of Walter Benjamin, Matthew Charles (University of Westminster) proposes to examine Benjamin’s philosophy of education through the focus of his concept of educative experience.

 

Matthew Charles

Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities, University of Westminster.

Matthew is the author of a forthcoming book ‘Modernism Between Benjamin and Goethe’, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, forthcoming entries on Walter Benjamin for the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, and chapters and articles on critical theory and education in the Sage Handbook of Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Pedagogies of Disaster, New German Critique, Boundary Two, Studies in Philosophy and Education, Pedagogy, Culture and Society and Radical Philosophy. His next book, to be published in Punctum’s Risking Education imprint, is on the ‘educational grotesque’.

See: https://benjaminpedagogy.wordpress.com/2019/06/11/talk-the-concept-of-educative-experience-in-walter-benjamins-critical-theory-wed-19th-july-2019-london/ and https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/events/2019/jun/concept-educative-experience-walter-benjamins-critical-theory

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Athens, The Academy

NEW DATE FOR ‘THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY’ – MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

NEW DATE for ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, Philosophy Department, Middlesex University

The Middlesex workshop on the Humanities will now take place on TUESDAY 7 DECEMBER 2010, 11am-6pm, Saloon (M004), Ground Floor, Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ.

Schedule:

11am
Christian Kerslake
Introduction: Philosophy, the Humanities and the University

11.30
Andrew McGettigan
How will Willett’s ‘New Providers’ affect the Arts and Humanities? Independents, For-Profits and External Degrees in the Proposals for Higher Education

12.00
Dave Hill
Education and Resistance in/under Capitalism

12.30
Discussion

1.00
Break for Lunch

2.00
Johann Hoiby, Alfie Meadows, Maria-Louise Rosbech
Student Reflections

2.45
Andrew Goffey
Stupidity and the University

3.15
Matthew Charles
Philanthropy and the Image of the University

3.45
Discussion & Coffee

4.30
Mark Kelly
Resisting the Bureaucratisation of the University

5.00 
Marina Vishmidt
The Humanities and the Location of Value in the University

5.30
Discussion

* * * 
THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY

What are the Humanities, and what are they for? What is a university, and what is it for? Is it possible to stipulate that Humanities education is an essential component of what a university does, or should be doing? How can the links be reinforced between Humanities education and principles of universality and equality?

In her recent book Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton, 2010), Martha Nussbaum argues that “thirsty for national profit, nations, and their systems of education, are heedlessly discarding skills that are needed to keep democracies alive. If this trend continues, nations all over the world will soon be producing generations of useful machines, rather than complete citizens who can think for themselves”. She presents a case that Humanities education is essential to the cultivation of critical thinking, reflection and empathy with others. 

How, then, to effectively defend Humanities education? At this current juncture, is it possible to effectively defend the Humanities and higher education without also calling for an overall reform of the economy? 

In the past five years Middlesex University has abandoned teaching and research in two key Humanities subjects, History (closed in 2006) and Philosophy (admissions stopped in 2010). It appears to be on course to reduce all of its Humanities provision. This workshop will be a forum for lecturers and students to discuss the future of the Humanities at Middlesex and in the UK in general.

The workshop is co-organised by Andrew Goffey (a.goffey@mdx.ac.uk) and Christian Kerslake (c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk).

Attendance is free, but please register at mdxhumanities@yahoo.co.uk.

Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

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Pink Curtain

Pink Curtain

BEYOND THE PINK CURTAIN?

 

Winter Colloquium: Beyond the Pink Curtain? Eastern European Sexualities, Homophobia and Western Eyes

22nd January 2010

Birkbeck Institute for Social Research

Sexualities, as aspects of identity and as part of the public language of nation, are a controversial feature of post-communist transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Radical political changes have led to the emergence of new social actors, such as the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) movement, the airing of new discourses about sexuality, as well as the eruption of new social conflicts and divisions.

This interdisciplinary Colloquium will  bring together scholars in the social sciences, history, Slavic and other area studies, as well as activists from LGBT communities, to examine the relationships between gender, nation and sexuality. How, for example, did the emergence of revised national identities after 1989 relate to new conceptions of non-normative gender and sexuality? What were the local dimensions of the ‘lesbian and gay question’, and why did they develop? How did queer sexualities in this region evolve historically? And what influence does that historical legacy have today? What are the specificities and particularities of Central and Eastern European sexual identities, within the region and compared with Western and other non-Western formations?

There will be a screening of the film “Beyond the Pink Curtain” (2009) and a discussion with Director Matthew Charles at 3pm on Thursday 21st January in the Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square.

Numbers are strictly limited, so please register early.

Cost, includes vegetarian lunch:  £25 Standard, £10 Birkbeck staff and all students.
Payment is by credit/debit card – Standard Booking Form   Birkbeck Staff & all Students
Friday 22nd  January 2010, Room 541, Birkbeck College Main Building, 9.30am – 5pm (Registration 9.30 in Room 538)

Film screening – Thursday 21st  January 2010  Registration for the free film screening – email Julia Eisner j.eisner@bbk.ac.uk

Detailed program and abstracts:
http://robertkulpa.com/index.php?/projects/BISR-Colloquium.html

Info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/news/pinkcurtain

Organiser: Robert Kulpa (roberto@kulpa.org.uk)

All the best,
Robert Kulpa
0044.785.999.5074
http://robertkulpa.com

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