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Communism of Capital

Communism of Capital

THE COMMUNISM OF CAPITAL

Ephemera Volume 13 Number 3 (August 2013)

Ephemera is at: http://www.ephemerajournal.org

ISBN 9781906948207

Current Issue

The communism of capital? What could this awkward turn of phrase mean, and what might it signify with regards to the state of the world today? Does it merely describe a reality in which communist demands are twisted to become productive of capital, a capitalist realism supplemented by a disarmed communist ideology? Or does the death of the capitalist utopia mean that capital cannot contain the antagonism expressed by Occupy and other movements any more, and therefore must confront communism upfront?

The 12 contributions to this latest issue of ephemera explore the valances of the paradoxical and seemingly incoherent expression that is ‘the communism of capital’. Collectively they stake out new territory for the theorisation and organization of political struggle in a context in which capital has become increasingly aware that its age-old nemesis might today be lurking at its very heart.

You can order a print copy of the whole issue now at your local bookstore!

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editorial

The communism of capital?

Armin Beverungen

Anna-Maria Murtola

Gregory Schwartz

article

Spectre of the commons: Spectrum regulation in the communism of capital

Rachel O’Dwyer

article

Infecting capitalism with the common: The class process, communication, and surplus

David Carlone

article

Pro Bono? On philanthrocapitalism as ideological answer to inequality

Mikkel Thorup

article

Communism, occupy and the question of form

Saroj Giri

note

Does capital need a commons fix?

Massimo De Angelis

note

Communicity

Colin Cremin

note

Common as silence

Peter Fleming

note

Recomposing precarity: Notes on the laboured politics of class composition

Stevphen Shukaitis

review

Theorizing debt for social change

Miranda Joseph

review

The spectre of anarchism

Thomas Swann

review

Friendship and counter-conduct in the neoliberal regime of truth

Richard Weiskopf

review

‘Of luck and leverage’

Joyce Goggin

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communism of Capital

Communism of Capital

Revolution at Point Zero

REVOLUTION AT POINT ZERO: HOUSEWORK, REPRODUCTION AND FEMINIST STRUGGLE

Book Launch

Silvia Federici launches Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction and Feminist Struggle.

12 November, 6pm, LG02, New Academic Building, Goldsmiths University, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW, near New Cross station.

 

Written between 1974 and the present, Revolution at Point Zero collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles on this terrain—to escape it, to better its conditions, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations.

Indeed, as Federici reveals, behind the capitalist organization of work and the contradictions inherent in “alienated labor” is an explosive ground zero for revolutionary practice upon which are decided the daily realities of our collective reproduction.

Beginning with Federici’s organizational work in the Wages for Housework movement, the essays collected here unravel the power and politics of wide but related issues including the international restructuring of reproductive work and its effects on the sexual division of labor, the globalization of care work and sex work, the crisis of elder care, the development of affective labor, and the politics of the commons.

Praise:

“Finally we have a volume that collects the many essays that over a period of four decades Silvia Federici has written on the question of social reproduction and women’s struggles on this terrain. While providing a powerful history of the changes in the organization of reproductive labor, Revolution at Point Zero documents the development of Federici’s thought on some of the most important questions of our time: globalization, gender relations, the construction of new commons.”
Mariarosa Dalla Costa, coauthor of The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community and Our Mother Ocean

“As the academy colonizes and tames women’s studies, Silvia Federici speaks the experience of a generation of women for whom politics was raw, passionately lived, often in the shadow of an uncritical Marxism. She spells out the subtle violence of housework and sexual servicing, the futility of equating waged work with emancipation, and the ongoing invisibility of women’s reproductive labors. Under neoliberal globalization women’s exploitation intensifies—in land enclosures, in forced migration, in the crisis of elder care. With ecofeminist thinkers and activists, Federici argues that protecting the means of subsistence now becomes the key terrain of struggle, and she calls on women North and South to join hands in building new commons.”
Ariel Salleh, author of Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx, and the Postmodern

“The zero point of revolution is where new social relations first burst forth, from which countless waves ripple outward into other domains. For over thirty years, Silvia Federici has fiercely argued that this zero point cannot have any other location but the sphere of reproduction. It is here that we encounter the most promising battlefield between an outside to capital and a capital that cannot abide by any outsides. This timely collection of her essays reminds us that the shape and form of any revolution are decided in the daily realities and social construction of sex, care, food, love, and health. Women inhabit this zero point neither by choice nor by nature, but simply because they carry the burden of reproduction in a disproportionate manner. Their struggle to take control of this labor is everybody’s struggle, just as capital’s commodification of their demands is everybody’s commodification.”
Massimo De Angelis, author of The Beginning of History: Values, Struggles, and Global Capital

“In her unfailing generosity of mind, Silvia Federici has offered us yet another brilliant and groundbreaking reflection on how capitalism naturalizes the exploitation of every aspect of women’s productive and reproductive life. Federici theorizes convincingly that, whether in the domestic or public sphere, capital normalizes women’s labor as ‘housework’ worthy of no economic compensation or social recognition. Such economic and social normalization of capitalist exploitation of women underlies the gender-based violence produced by the neoliberal wars that are ravaging communities around the world, especially in Africa. The intent of such wars is to keep women off the communal lands they care for, while transforming them into refugees in nation-states weakened by the negative effects of neoliberalism. Silvia Federici’s call for ecofeminists’ return to the Commons against Capital is compelling. Revolution at Point Zero is a timely release and a must read for scholars and activists concerned with the condition of women around the world.”
Ousseina D. Alidou, Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa (CAFA), Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers University and author of Engaging Modernity: Muslim Women and the Politics of Agency in Postcolonial Niger

About Silvia Federici:

Silvia Federici is a feminist writer, teacher, and militant. In 1972, she was cofounder of the International Feminist Collective, which launched the Wages for Housework campaign internationally. With other members of Wages for Housework, like Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James, and with feminist authors like Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Federici has been instrumental in developing the concept of “reproduction” as a key to class relations of exploitation and domination in local and global contexts, and as central to forms of autonomy and the commons.

In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and education systems. From 1987 to 2005, she also taught international studies, women’s studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY.

Her decades of research and political organizing accompanies a long list of publications on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education, culture, international politics, and more recently on the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons. Her steadfast commitment to these issues resounds in her focus on autonomy and her emphasis on the power of what she calls self-reproducing movements as a challenge to capitalism through the construction of new social relations.

Product Details:

Author: Silvia Federici
Publisher: PM Press/Common Notions/Autonomedia
ISBN: 978-1-60486-333-8
Published September 2012
Format: Paperback
Size: 8 by 5
Page count: 208 Pages
Subjects: Women’s Studies/Politics/Sociology

Revolution at Point Zero at PM Press: https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=420

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Karl Marx

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: NEW CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

For Proposed International Sociological Association 2012 Panel:

Title: Marxism and IPE: New Critical Engagements

Abstract:

Accumulation through dispossession, new enclosures, rent becoming profit, general intellect, immaterial labor, multitudes and the common. All of these are Marxist concepts of some variety or another which although prevalent in geography, sociology, anthropology and cultural studies still have not made their way into International Political Economy, where Marxist perspectives remain marginal and somewhat parochial (limited to historical materialist and world-systems analyses).

This panel calls for papers interested in exploring issues of global capital and empire from fresh theoretical angles such as those offered by autonomist Marxists like Hardt & Negri, Christian Marazzi, Sandro Mezzadra, Franco Berardi (bifo), and Silvia Federici, normative Marxists like George Caffentzis, Massimo de Angelis, David Graeber, and Harry Cleaver and Marxist geographers like Saskia Sassen, David Harvey, and Jamie Peck.

We welcome both theoretical engagements with questions of accumulation and valorization in internation al politics as well as more specific studies of the politics of everyday life, e.g., financialization, labor, education, consumption, culture, identity and ecology.    

Please submit your papers titles and abstracts to the conveners, Wanda Vrasti wndvrst@googlemail.com and Nicholas Kiersey kiersey@ohio.edu, by May 25th.

Note, please, that we intend to make this panel the basis of an edited book volume, should it be accepted. Thank you!

International Sociological Association: http://www.isa-sociology.org/

Universities in Crisis (an ISA blog): http://www.isa-sociology.org/universities-in-crisis/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Incident

NEW COMMONER AND CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Dear friends

This is to announce that a new issue of the commoner is out consisting essentially of a long essay by J. Martin Pedersen on Property, Commoning and the Politics of Free Software and a call for contributions on real-case commoning projects. 

The Commoner: http://www.commoner.org.uk/

Happy New Year

Massimo De Angelis

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Turbulence

TURBULENCE 5

OUT NOW!

TURBULENCE 5

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT?

Until recently, anyone who suggested nationalising the banks would have been derided as a ‘quack’ and a ‘crank’, as lacking the most basic understanding of the functioning of a ‘complex, globalised world’. The grip of ‘orthodoxy’ disqualified the idea, and many more, without the need even to offer a counter-argument.

And yet, in this time of intersecting crises, when it seems like everything could, and should, have changed, it paradoxically feels as though very little has. Individuals and companies have hunkered down to try and ride out the crisis. Nationalisations and government spending have been used to prevent change, not initiate it. Anger and protest have erupted around different aspects of the crises, but no common or consistent reaction has seemed able to cohere. We appear unable to move on.

For many years, social movements could meet and recognise one another on the *common ground* of rejecting neoliberalism, society’s old *middle ground* — those discourses and practices that defined the centre of the political field. The crisis of the middle has meant a crumbling of the common.

And what now? Will neoliberalism continue to stumble on without direction, zombie-like? Or, is it time for something completely different?

CONTENTS:

Turbulence: ‘Life in limbo?’

Gifford Hartman, ‘California in Crisis: Everything touched by capital turns toxic’

Bini Adamczak and Anna Dost, ‘What would it mean to lose? On the history of actually-existing failure’

Frieder Otto Wolf and Tadzio Mueller, ‘Green New Deal: Dead end or pathway beyond capitalism?’

p.m., ‘It’s all about potatoes and computers: Recipes for the cook-shops of the future’

Colectivo Situaciones, ‘Disquiet in the impasse’

George Caffentzis, ‘‘Everything must change so that everything can stay the same’: Notes on Obama’s Energy Plan’

Walter Mignolo, ‘The communal and the decolonial’

Massimo De Angelis, ‘The tragedy of the capitalist commons’

Rebecca Solnit, ‘Falling Together’

Rodrigo Nunes, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’

ALSO FEATURING…

…a collection of texts, ten years after the protests against the World Trade Organisation in Seattle, asking people from across the global movement, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’, at t-10.

Contributors to the feature are: David Solnit, Gustavo Esteva, Emir Sader, Phil McLeish, Rubia Salgado, João Pedro Stédile, A CrimethInc ex-Worker, Precarias a la Deriva, Trevor Ngwane, Marcela and Oscar Olivera, Heloisa Primavera, Chris Carlsson, The Free Association, David Bleakney, Olivier de Marcellus, Go Hirasawa and Sabu Kohso, John Clarke, Guy Taylor, Thomas Seibert, Dr Simon Lewis, Amador Fernández-Savater.

The Issue is illustrated by the photo series ‘Flat Horizon’ by Marcos Vilas Boas.

Turbulence: Ideas for Movement are: David Harvie, Keir Milburn, Tadzio Mueller, Rodrigo Nunes, Michal Osterweil, Kay Summer, Ben Trott.

http://www.turbulence.org.uk

ORDER A COPY

Copies can be ordered from editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence is free, but we ask that you make a donation towards postage: http://turbulence.org.uk/donate/ (any additional donations greatly appreciated!)

All texts are also freely available via our website as of today.

HELP OUT

A collection of resources to help publicise the issue (posters, flyers, web-banners, etc…) can be found here:
http://turbulence.org.uk/turbulence-5/turbulence-5-resources/

Get in touch if you can help out translating any of the articles in this issue: editors@turbulence.org.uk

Order a bundle of the magazine to distribute in your part of the world.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
www.turbulence.org.uk // www.myspace.com/turbulence_ideas4movement //
www.twitter.com/turbulence_mag // editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence’s Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Turbulence-Ideas-for-Movement/171769885530

To stay informed about future ‘Turbulence’ publications and projects, subscribe to our (very!) low-traffic e-newsletter here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/turbulenceannouncementslist

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE AND ACTIVISM

CONFERENCE

The Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, School of English, Communication & Philosophy; in cooperation with Culture, Imagination and Practice Research Group, School of Social Sciences CARDIFF UNIVERSITY, WALES

12-13 NOVEMBER, 2009

Post-identity – The political Deleuze  – The Commons
Activism-s – Geo-activism – Micro-interventions

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT MARCELO SVIRSKY: DELEUZE@CF.AC.UK

Speakers:

Keynote: Ian Buchanan (Cardiff ); Jeremy Gilbert (East London);  Paul Patton (UNSW); Nathan Widder (Royal Holloway)

Ronnen Ben-Arie (AVIG, Israel/Palestine); Simone Bignall (UNSW); Hywel Bishop (Cardiff); Steven Brown (Leicester); Christoph Brunner (Montreal); John Cromby (Loughborough); Andrew Dornon (Southwestern); Brad Evans (Leeds); Jan L. Harris; Gašper Kralj (Radical Education Collective, Slovenia); Bryce Lease (Kent); Ioulia Mermigka (Athens); Keir Milburn (Leeds); Rodrigo Nunes (Turbulence); Karl Palmås (Chalmers, Sweden); Dimitris Papadopoulos (Cardiff); Ofer Parchev (Haifa); Bojana Piškur (Radical Education Collective, Slovenia); Maria Puig de la Bellacasa (Cardiff); Remy Robertson (Southwestern); Stevphen Shukaitis (Autonomedia, Essex); Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck); Laurent de Sutter (LSTS, Belgium); Marcelo Svirsky (Cardiff); Vidar Thorsteinsson (Reykjavik Academy)

FOR REGISTRATION AND PROGRAMME VISIT: HTTP://WWW.CARDIFF.AC.UK/ENCAP/NEWSANDEVENTS

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Historical Materialism

Historical Materialism

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM VOLUME 17 ISSUE 3 (2009)

 

http://www.brill.nl/hima

To subscribe, write to: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Historical Materialism
Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 3
2009

CONTENTS:

Articles

Massimo de Angelis and David Harvie
‘Cognitive Capitalism’ and the Rat-Race: How Capital Measures Immaterial Labour in British Universities

Iain Pirie
The Political Economy of Academic Publishing

Maria Turchetto
Althusser and Monod: A ‘New Alliance’?

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’ (contd.)

Vittorio Morfino
The Syntax of Violence. Between Hegel and Marx

Archive
David Fernbach
Editorial Introduction to Paul Levi’s Our Path: Against Putschism and What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Paul Levi
Our Path: Against Putschism

Paul Levi
What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Interventions

Alberto Toscano
Partisan Thought

Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho
Twixt Ricardo and Rubin: Debating Kincaid Once More

Jim Kincaid
The Logical Construction of Value Theory: More on Fine and
Saad-Filho

Review Articles

Christian Høgsbjerg
on Frank Rosengarten’s Urbane Revolutionary: C.L.R. James and the Struggle for a New Society and Brett St Louis’s Rethinking Race, Politics, and Poetics: C.L.R. James’ Critique of Modernity

Robert T. Tally Jr
on Loren Goldner’s Herman Melville: Between Charlemagne and the Antemosaic Cosmic Man: Race, Class, and the Crisis of Bourgeois Ideology in the American Renaissance Writer

Seongjin Jeong
on Iain Pirie’s The Korean Developmental State: From Dirigisme to Neo-Liberalism

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism
Peter Thomas
Catharsis

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

The Labour Debate / El Trabajo En Debate

The Labour Debate / El Trabajo En Debate

THE LABOUR DEBATE

 

 

The Labour Debate: An Investigation into the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work was originally published in 2002 by Ashgate. The book was edited by Ana Dinerstein and Michake Neary. It has now been translated into Spanish, with a new Preface by Ana Dinerstein. The bibliographic details of this new Spanish edition are:

A.C.Dinerstein y Neary Mike (2009) (Comp.) El Trabajo en debate. Una investigacion sobre la teroia y realidad del trabajo capitalista, Ediciones Herramienta, Buenos Aires, ISBN: 978-987-1505-09-8

My chapter in the was 2002 edition was ‘Fuel for the Living Fire: Labour-Power!’.

Details on the Spanish Edition (2009):

Ediciones Herramienta presenta:

EL TRABAJO EN DEBATE: Una investigación sobre la teoría y la realidad del trabajo capitalista

Ana C. Dinerstein, Michael Neary

Compiladores

Ediciones Herramienta, Buenos Aires, 304 páginas

ISBN: 978-987-1505-09-8

 

Temas:

John Holloway Clase y clasificación: en contra, dentro y más allá del trabajo, y Un marxismo reduccionista. • Simon Clarke La lucha de clases y la clase obrera: el problema del fetichismo de la mercancía • Werner Bonefeld Capital, trabajo y acumulación primitiva: clase y constitución • Graham Taylor Trabajo y subjetividad: repensar los límites de la conciencia obrera • Massimo De Angelis Hayek, Bentham y la máquina global del trabajo: la aparición del panóptico fractal • Harry Cleaver ¡El trabajo todavía es la cuestión central! Palabras nuevas para mundos nuevos • Michael Neary El trabajo se mueve: una crítica al concepto de “sindicalismo del movimiento social” • Glenn Rikowski Combustible para el fuego vivo: ¡la fuerza de trabajo! • Ana C. Dinerstein Recobrando la materialidad: el desempleo y la subjetividad invisible del trabajo • Ana C. Dinerstein y Michael Neary Antivalor en movimiento: el trabajo, la subsunción real y la lucha contra el capitalismo

Palabras de los editores

Un plan

Era una tarde fría de un jueves de septiembre de 2007. Llegamos al departamento donde se alojaba Ana junto a su familia. Esa tarde era la despedida, porque debía volver a Inglaterra. Nos encontramos entre juguetes, mate, facturas, sándwiches, familiares y amistades.

Días antes habíamos empezado el plan. Se nos había ocurrido una idea loca. Había sido en un instante fugaz, de esos que suceden en el éxtasis generado por lecturas irreverentes, por aquellos textos que dejan la planicie de las letras para provocar relieves en nuestras vidas. Puntos de fuga. Salidas al más allá. El plan se ponía en marcha, sólo faltaba una cómplice clave.

En medio de la reunión, nos retiramos unos minutos con Ana para conversar en privado. Allí fue cuando juntos, susurrando, como si estuviéramos armando una bomba, lanzamos nuestro plan.

— Ana, queremos traducir The Labor Debate. Es un texto fascinante y nos interesa que sea parte de las discusiones que circulan de este lado del charco. Por eso este libro tiene que ser editado en castellano. Nosotros nos encargamos de las traducciones.

Ana respondió afirmativamente. El plan se ponía en marcha. Su sorpresa y agradecimiento fue tan motivador como los textos mismos.

A los pocos días Ana nos confirmó que conseguiría el dinero para la publicación: Michael Neary, el otro compilador de la obra, fue quien se encargó de ello. Con esa noticia en nuestras manos reunimos a un grupo de traductores amigos: Carla Poth, Florencia Martínez, María de las Nieves Puglia, Mariana Carrolli y Nicolás Harambour. Junto a ellos se sumaron otros traductores y las manos estoicas que hicieron posible la publicación del libro, editando, terminando y realizando las traducciones faltantes, como así también enseñándonos el camino del quehacer editorial. Nos referimos, pues, a Francisco Paco Sobrino, Carlos Pipo Cuéllar, Sibila Seibert, Ignacio Chiche Vázquez y Néstor López.

Un cronopio llamado El Trabajo en Debate

El texto que estamos presentando desde Herramienta pertenece a esa rara especie de cronopios cortaziano. El mismo constituye un debate que tiene una forma muy particular: cada autor parece estar escuchando una misma canción al tiempo que hace su propio baile. Se conforma así un bricolage en el que el trabajo es puesto como el fuego que da vida. El debate nos recuerda que el trabajo, como el sol, se esconde en la inmensidad del firmamento para aparecer a través de la luz más destacada en la noche, la(s) luna(s), aunque ella misma ya no sea el sol.

Herramienta desde hace varios años se ha dado la tarea de dar a conocer una serie de autores que proponen un debate en y desde el marxismo en múltiples direcciones. Son autores que han dado lugar a esa dolorosa incomodidad teórica llamada marxismo abierto. Así Debate sobre el trabajo forma parte de un esfuerzo emprendido por Herramienta que –explorando el campo abierto por los compañeros y compañeras de dos revistas que han dejado su huella en la izquierda argentina, Cuadernos del Sur y Doxa– encuentra en este texto el incentivo para continuar la discusión en torno a un tema que parece haber sido olvidado en las ciencias sociales y que a su vez ha recibido un desigual tratamiento al interior del propio marxismo: el trabajo.

Son estos autores-cronopios los que, explorando la categoría trabajo, nos llevan a ver en ésta mucho más que una realidad empírica; nos trasladan con esta categoría hacia el estallido de las teorías famas y de las realidades empíricas. Son, en definitiva, autores cortazianos que nos provocan la sensación de que al terminar de leerlos sabemos que la única seguridad con la que contamos es la de estar viviendo en un mundo que resulta insoportable, y que, aunque no lo queramos, eso mismo que lo vuelve intolerable es nuestra producción.

Por ello, para el colectivo que conforma Herramienta es una alegría muy grande impulsar la edición de este libro. No sólo por la calidad de los textos, ni por la amistad que a nos une con los autores. Lo es porque seguimos reforzando el lugar que ocupa Herramienta: aportar al debate sobre el cambio revolucionario.

Desde la editorial queremos fervientemente que El Trabajo en Debate se transforme en una herramienta para el debate intelectual, militante y académico. Esta aspiración no es casual: nos encontramos hoy en un momento en que la teoría ha vuelto sobre sus pasos para refugiarse en la fuerza de lo constituido, en las “teorías seguras”. Asimismo, la práctica militante parece recostarse en la certeza de las formas constituidas. Pareciera ser que nuevamente nos encontramos ante el ocaso (del pesimismo) de la seguridad. Sin embargo, los textos que conforman este libro, a pesar de haber sido escritos hace ya diez años, contienen la actualidad de mirar allí donde la fuerza del presente encuentra su fortaleza en la irrupción del pasado no realizado. Dicho con otras palabras, el texto que estamos presentando no sólo posee vigor por los temas tratados, sino porque representa un modo teórico en el que la lucha contra lo constituido se produce desde la incomodidad de lo no sido aún.

Rodrigo Pascual y Luciana Ghiotto

Buenos Aires, 21 de abril de 2009

http://www.herramienta.com.ar

Bibliographic details for the original 2002 Edition:

Ana C. Dinerstein and Michael Neary (Eds.) (2002) The Labour Debate: An Investigation in to the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work, Aldershot: Ashgate.

ISBN: 0-7546-1779-3

Summary at the publishers (Ashgate) and ordering details: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calctitle=1&pageSubject=413&pagecount=11&title_id=4163&edition_id=4748

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Power to the People?


…masses, proletariat, workers, soviets, nation, community, subalterns, multitude, commons…

Saturday 9th May 2009
Radical Philosophy Conference, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London

BOOK NOW!

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: 
Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

 


PROGRAMME:


Plenary (chair: Peter Osborne, RP)
Gayatri Spivak (Columbia University, NY): ‘They, the People’

 


1. The General Will (chair: Peter Hallward, RP)


David Andress (Portsmouth): ‘The General Will on the Street: Parisian Activism, Sovereignty and Power, 1789–93’

 

Sophie Wahnich

(CNRS, Paris): ‘How Do the People Make Themselves Heard?’

 


2. Urban Collectivities (chair: David Cunningham, RP)

AbdouMaliq Simone (Goldsmiths): ‘Urban Intersections and the Politics of Anticipation’

Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester): ‘Reflections on the Post-Political City’

 

3. Population & Biopolitics (chair: Claudia Aradau, RP)

Couze Venn (Nottingham Trent): ‘Biopolitics, Diasporas and (Neo)Liberal Political Economy’

Encarnacion Gutierrez Rodriguez (Manchester): ‘Feminist Strategies Revisited – Sexopolitics, Multitude and Biopolitics’

 


4. Class, Commons & Multitude (chair: Esther Leslie, RP)

 

Massimo De Angelis

(UEL): ‘Crisis, Tragedies and the Commons’

Daniel Bensaid (University of Paris-VIII), ‘Can We (Still) Break the Vicious Circle of Domination?’

 

 

‘Power to the people!’ was once a revolutionary slogan, but reference to government by the people and for the people soon became an empty cliché of the post-revolutionary status quo. The people has become a notoriously ambiguous and contested term, for which numerous alternatives have been proposed: the proletariat, the workers, the masses, the soviets, the nation, the community, the multitude, the commons… And now? How might we assess the different  conceptions of political change embodied in these often conflicting ideas? What is the political and philosophical significance of `the people’ today?

 

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

 

 

 

The Commoner

New Issue

 

The Commoner, No.13 – Winter 2009 – ‘There’s an Energy Crisis (among others) in the Air …

 

http://www.commoner.org.uk/

 

 

CONTENTS:

 

Kolya Abramsky and Massimo De Angelis: Introduction: Energy Crisis (among others) is in the Air

 

Tom Keefer: Fossil Fuels, Capitalism, and Class Struggle

 

Kolya Abramsky: Energy and Labor in the World Economy

 

Evo Morales: Open Letter on Climate Change: “Save the Planet from Capitalism”

 

George Caffentzis: A Discourse on Prophetic Method: Oil Crises and Political Economy, Past and Future

 

Ewa Jasiewicz: Iraqi Oil Workers’ Movements: Spaces of Transformation and Transition

 

Patrick Bond: The Global Carbon Trade Debate: For or Against the Privatisation of the Air?

 

Ariel Salleh: Climate Change, Social Change – and the ‘Other Footprint’

 

Shannon Walsh: The Smell of Money: Alberta’s Tar Sands

 

Jane Kruse and Preben Maegaard: An Authentic Story about how a Local Community became Self-sufficient in Pollution Free Energy and Created a Source of Income for Citizens

 

TRAPESE Collective: The Rocky Road to a Real Transition: The Transition Towns Movement and What it Means for Social Change

 

Monica Vargas Collazos: The Ecological Debt of Agro-fuels

 

Tatiana Roa Avendano and Jessica Toloza: Dynamics of a Songful Resistance

 

Sergio Oceransky: Wind Conflicts in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec – The Role of Ownership and Decision-Making Models in Indigenous Resistance to Wind Projects in Southern Mexico

 

Jane Kruse: The End of One Danish Windmill Co-operative

 

Plus videos …

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk