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Robin Small

Robin Small

NEOLIBERALISM AND EDUCATION WORKSHOP

BISA IPEG/BLT Workshop and Film Screening: Education Meets Neoliberalism and the Political Economy of Precarity

Location: University of Middlesex (MDX), Hendon. Town Hall, Committee Room 3
Date and time: 14 February, 2014, 10.30 – 19.00

Co-sponsors: BISA-International Political Economy Group (IPEG, Convenor Phoebe Moore) and BISA- Learning and Teaching Working Group (BLT, Convenor Steven Curtis, London Metropolitan University, Higher Education Academy)

Local organisers: Phoebe Moore (MDX Law), Elizabeth Cotton (MDX Business), Merilin Nurmsalu (MDX Law)

All welcome. Please email Merilin Nurmsalu merilin.nurmsalu@gmail.com with interest in attending for catering purposes.

Website: http://www.bisa-ipeg.org/uncategorized/education-meets-neoliberalism-and-the-political-economy-of-precarity/

This workshop will critically examine the political economy of current changes in education policy in the United Kingdom and internationally as it has impacted and impacts marginalized groups as well as educators. Discussions will touch on the political economy of precarity and ask difficult questions about the flexilisation of the labour market and how it is reflected in every level of education from early schooling to adult, community, higher and trade union education and training. Participants will look at changes to education in all levels of education from secondary to University, adult, community and trade union education including the depoliticisation of pedagogies and curricula. Further challenges are brought about through introduction of new technologies including distance learning, online administration and new performance indicators, all of which we will argue can be appropriated for critical use.

The changing role of educators will be assessed as we look at critical pedagogies, the seen purpose for private involvement in education and the concept of ‘employability’, internships and possibilities for critique and intervention. In that light we invite educators, public intellectuals and trade unionists who look at the need for specific absences to be revisited. This also includes critical investigations around the understanding of the dangers of precarity for mental health, the costs of precarity for educators and students, political trade union education and the waning of working class and disability representation in recent education policy as well as the classroom.

This event is intentionally set to run the day after a very important event on similar themes run by Maureen Spencer, Heather Clay and Alan Durant entitled  ‘The state, the university and liberal education: a complex relationship between piper and tune’ on Hendon campus on 13th February. Please email Christiana Rose for more details about this c.rose@mdx.ac.uk .

14th February programme
10 – 10.30 Coffee/tea, registration

10.30 – 11.30 Plenary speaker: Matthew Watson University of Warwick, ‘Taking the Classroom into the Community’ 
Chair: Phoebe Moore

11.30 – 12.30 Plenary speaker: Mike Neary University of Lincoln, ‘Pedagogy of Excess: an alternative political economy for student life’
Chair: Steven Curtis

12.30 – 1.15 Lunch. Over lunch, Steven Curtis, Politics and Economics Lead for the Higher Education Academy (HEA) will take the opportunity to chat to participants about the support that the HEA offers university educators.

1.15 – 3.15 The Future of Trade Union Education (Workshop one)
Plenary speaker: Jo Cain, Head of Education for Unison, on the future of trade union education: perspectives from Unison
Chair: Elizabeth Cotton
Participants: Ian Manborde, Elizabeth Cotton, Martin Upchurch, Education for Action (Phoebe Moore, Kirsten Forkert, Miguel Martinez Lucio), Industrial Officer PCS, NUT, organiser for domestic workers

3.15 – 5.15 Community Education and beyond (Workshop two)
Plenary speaker: Joyce Canaan, Birmingham Radical Education (BRE(A)D) on critical thinking and practice and countering capitalist ‘realisms’
Chair: Steven Curtis
Participants: Annabel Kiernan, Dave Hill, Johnna Montgomerie, People’s Political Economy (Laura Hill and Sarah Kunz)

5.15 – 7.00  Film screening We will screen, and Director Luke Fowler will lead a discussion about his incredible 61 minute film ‘The Poor Stockinger, the Luddite Cropper and the Deluded Followers of Joanna Southcott’ which is a beautiful documentary about the Marxist historian Edward Palmer (E. P.) Thompson, who was employed by the Workers’ Education Association (WEA) from 1946, aged 24, to teach adults in the industrial towns of the West Riding. These WEA classes were open to people for whom university education was not previously available. 
See: http://lux.org.uk/collection/works/poor-stockinger-luddite-cropper-and-deluded-followers-joanna-southcott

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski   

Revolution

CRISIS AND MOBILIZATION SINCE 1789

Call for Papers

International Conference “Crisis and Mobilization since 1789” International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, February 22-24, 2013

Organized by the International Scholars’ Network “History of Societies and Socialisms” (HOSAS)/H-Socialisms Organizers of the 2nd HOSAS conference, to be held in Amsterdam in February of 2013, welcome proposals from all fields of the social sciences and humanities from around the world that consider socialism and its relation to the conference theme –Crisis and Mobilization since 1789.

The political Left—mainstream socialists above all, but also anarchists, communists, feminists, and others—has played a central role throughout modern history in giving access to democracy and its benefits to ever widening portions of society. Socialists—especially those organized in Marxist-oriented European social democratic parties—proved adept at mobilizing popular support during political, economic, and other crises to push forward agendas aiming to combat the social inequalities created by industrial capitalism, to broaden citizenly enfranchisement in order to include formerly excluded groups (for example, wage-earning workers and women), and to pursue many other reformist or revolutionary goals. Geoff Eley’s landmark study Forging Democracy (2002), is among the strongest recent arguments for the importance of the socialist Left in shaping and democratizing modern European history, particularly through its capacity for mobilizing in response to crisis. We are pleased that Eley will be present at the conference to give a key-note address and engage in a discussion of his theses.

Alongside impressive successes, resounding defeats and setbacks have characterized socialism’s record in modern Europe and around the world. But until the late 1960s, conventional socialist or social democratic parties stood at the center of this drama and self-consciously led the European Left, while more revolutionary variants held sway in the “developing” world. Since the late 1960s, however, the socialist Left has declined in influence due to the rise of identity and one-issue movements (for example, feminist and environmentalist movements), the changing geographies and modalities of the global economy and labor, the concomitant weakening of trade unions that had constituted socialism’s traditional base of support in many countries, the final discrediting and collapse of Soviet-style “real existing socialism” in Eastern Europe, the growing power of neo-liberalism as the ideology of the political mainstream, and other structural and contingent changes. These developments have challenged conventional socialist politics’ claims to leadership of the political Left and have led many to question socialism’s very relevance.

Since the 2008 onset of the current economic crisis, critiques of capitalism—many of them invoking Marx and/or the socialist mobilizations of previous eras—have re-entered mainstream political debates in Europe and around the world. Scholarly discussions about this legacy and its contemporary relevance have also profited from a surge in interest. Not least, socialist parties have won some significant electoral contests, as they recently did in France. Yet in many places, conventional socialist or Leftist political parties still remain on the defensive and some of the most recent popular mobilizations that challenge the political and economic status quo (for instance, the Occupy Movement) generally reject alliances or identification with established socialist politics.

In this climate, we think it timely to consider the historical trajectory of socialism—in all its diverse forms—through crisis and mobilization. We understand crisis in the broadest sense of the word, encompassing not just economic downturns, but also political, social, cultural, and environmental crises as well as war, famine, natural disasters, and other disruptions. Crises vary in scale too, from the global or continental level down to the local. By bringing together scholars from multiple disciplines who specialize in various time periods and places across the globe, and by opening broad temporal, comparative, and transnational vistas, we hope to update and enrich the scholarly conversation about socialism(s).

Among the core questions that we aim to address are:

– How have socialist politics developed historically as a response to crisis, broadly defined, and through mobilization?

– Why have certain people and movements in history self-identified as “socialist,” and which theories and concepts have they drawn on?

– How and what did these people and movements learn from their activist experiences, and what are the memories and legacies of mass mobilization in times of crisis?

– What lessons – if any – do present-day activists and movements draw from the past, and how are various memories and myths appropriate to current debates and actions?

– To what extent have socialist mobilizations that respond to crisis displayed unique characteristics in the non-European/western or developing world?

– What have socialist mobilizations accomplished (or not accomplished) in attempting to redefine the relationships between the state and society and between society and capitalism?

– How has the recent economic crisis contributed to, or changed, socialist politics as well as our understanding of socialism as an aspect of European or global modernity?

– How have socialists (of any sort) stood in relation to other Leftist political groupings and/or non-Leftists in responding to crisis, both historically and today?

– To what extent does “socialism” remain a useful category for animating/galvanizing or studying mobilizations of a certain kind?

In addition to papers that address one or more of these questions, we invite papers or panels dealing with any of the following broad thematic areas in any part of the world that have relevance to the central conference theme:

I. Capitalism in Crisis: Experiences, diagnoses and solutions, past and present

II. Riots, Revolts & Revolutions: Violent reactions, street activisms, and their outcomes

III. Parties & Movements: Organisations, networks, and institutions

IV. Ideas & Programs: Analyses, ideologies, and remedies

V. Rebels & Leaders: Who is in charge, why and how?

VI. Elites & Masses: Interests, alliances, and encounters

We invite both junior and senior scholars to present results of research, works-in-progress, or polished papers concerning these issues and others related to the general workshop theme. We are interested in receiving individual paper proposals and proposals for panel sessions. The organizers will consider publishing some of the contributions following the conference. Conference presentations will be 15 minutes in length.

Please email your proposal (250-300 words) along with a brief (100 words max.) academic bio,

to H-SOCIALISMS@H-NET.MSU.EDU by September 30, 2012.

Keynote speaker:

Geoff Eley (University of Michigan): Forging Democracy: On the history of the “Left”, 1850-2000

The organizers are:

Giovanni Bernardini, German-Italian Historical Institute – FBK, Trento, Italy

Christina Morina, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany

Jakub S. Beneš, University of California, Davis, USA

Kasper Braskén, Åbo Akademi University, Finland

For more information on HOSAS/H-Socialisms, visit: http:// www.h-net.org/~socialisms/

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-201ccrisis-and-mobilization-since-1789201d-international-institute-of-social-history-amsterdam-february-22-24-2013

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

On the Idea of Communism – Conference Programme

 

Conference: 13-15 March 2009

“It’s just the simple thing that’s hard, so hard to do” (B. Brecht)

 

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bih/news/communism

Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities
ON THE IDEA OF COMMUNISM
13th/14th/15th March 2009
Logan Hall, Institute of Education
20 Bedford Way London WC1H 0AL

 

PROGRAMME:

 

 

Friday March 13

2pm    Costas Douzinas – Welcome

Alain Badiou: Introductory remarks

Michael Hardt: “The Production of the Common”

Bruno Bosteels: “The Leftist Hypothesis: Communism in the Age of Terror”

Peter Hallward: “Communism of the Intellect, Communism of the Will”

Alberto Toscano:    “Communist Power / Communist Knowledge”


Jean-Luc Nancy will be present throughout the conference and will intervene in the discussions.

6 pm    End


Saturday March 14

10am    Alessandro Russo: “Did the Cultural Revolution End Communism?”

Wang Hui:    “Transition towards Socialism”

Toni Negri: “Communisme: reflexions sur le concept et la pratique”

1pm    Lunch

Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities

3pm    Terry Eagleton: “Communism: Lear or Gonzalo?”

Jacques Ranciere:    “Communists without Communism?”

Alain Badiou: “Communism: a generic name”

6pm    End

 

Sunday March 15

10am    Slavoj Zizek: “To begin from the beginning over and over again”

Gianni Vattimo:    “Weak Communism?”

Judith Balso: “Communism: a hypothesis for philosophy, an impossible name for politics?”

Concluding Debate

2pm    End

 

For the previous post on this item, which provides a rationale for the Conference, see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2009/01/10/on-the-idea-of-communism/

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk