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Tag Archives: Marxist Philosophy of Education

Glenn Rikowski

LIFE IN THE HIGHER SAUSAGE FACTORY

Dr. Glenn Rikowski, School of Education, University of Northampton

Guest Lecture to the Teacher Education Research Group

Glenn Rikowski will talk about Capital in a Crisis of Higher Education, and Higher Education in a Crisis of Capital

22nd March 2012, 5.00pm, The Cass School of Education and Communities, Room 2.02, University of East London, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ

“Capitalist production is not merely the production of commodities, it is essentially the production of surplus-value. The labourer produces, not for himself, but for capital. It no longer suffices, therefore, that he should simply produce. He must produce surplus-value. That labourer alone is productive, who produces surplus-value for the capitalist, and thus works for the self-expansion of capital. If we may take an example from outside the sphere of production of material objects, a schoolmaster is a productive labourer, when, in addition to belabouring the heads of his scholars, he works like a horse to enrich the school proprietor. That the latter has laid out his capital in a teaching factory, instead of a sausage factory, does not alter the relation. Hence the notion of a productive labourer implies not merely a relation between work and useful effect, between labourer and product of labour, but also a specific, social relation of production, a relation that has sprung up historically and stamps the labourer as the direct means of creating surplus-value. To be a productive labourer is, therefore, not a piece of luck, but a misfortune” (Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I).

 

UPDATE, 5th March 2014: The paper can now be downloaded from Academia. There are many other of my papers there too. See: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

MARXIAN ANALYSIS OF SOCIETY, SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION SIG OF THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (MASSES)
CALL FOR PAPERS

2012 Annual Meeting – Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2012
http://www.facebook.com/l/7ba756tNF7qOe9ItKjSdc1iil3A/www.aera.net/

*Why Marxism? Whose Marxism? Let’s Begin from the Beginning.*

*Rethink Class, Race and Gender Inequalities and Education*

The current global momentum is a profound paradox. On one hand, our era has been witnessing huge and dramatic transformations propelled by the biotech movement including genetic and biotechnological discoveries, as well as, the electronic revolution of communications and information both of which have had a huge impact on the way knowledge has been produced and reproduced.

Despite such progress, on the other hand, global societies have been experiencing, among other things, the shocking exacerbation (and in some cases the return) of horrendous social evils, namely, the return of slavery, legitimization of human genocide, new pandemics, the return of high vulnerability to old sicknesses that seemed to have been eradicated and now appear to be linked to new pandemics like HIV/AIDS, and naturalization of war, the domestication of revolting social inequalities (cf. Sousa Santos, 2005), the need of a more predatory capitalism to sustain neoliberal capitalism, the emergence of a new economy propelled by the need to fight terror(ism) (cf. Giroux, 2011).

Despite the fact that we never had a society that produced as much knowledge as today’s society, the fact is such production not only has been incapable of building a fairer and just society, but also as it has just served to increase and multiply social inequality. Such shocking paradoxes bring to the fore the vitality of (neo)Marxist analyses, as the ‘most rigorous, comprehensive critique of capitalism ever to be launched’ (Eagleton, 2011).

The 2012 Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG program asks scholars and educators around the globe, profoundly committed with the struggle for social and cognitive justice, to rethinking not only class, race, and gender inequalities and education, but also if the reinvigoration of the (neo)Marxist analyses and contributions to society and education implies the need to ‘begin from the beginning’ (Zizek, 2009). We asked scholars to critically address questions such as why (neo)Marxism and whose (neo)Marxism is a key to rethink and understand the current global disruption of capitalism and its implications of the daily live of teachers and students.

AERA: http://www.area.net

MASSES Yahoo Group (Marx and Education SIG): http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MarxSIG/  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com