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Marxism and Feminism

Marxism and Feminism

MARXISM AND FEMINISM

A new book edited by Shahrzad Mojab

See: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/node/20825

Global events, from economic crisis to social unrest and militarization, disproportionately affect women. Yet around the world it is also women who are leading the struggle against oppression and exploitation. In light of renewed interest in Marxist theory among many women activists and academics, Marxism and Feminism presents a contemporary and accessible Marxist-feminist analysis on a host of issues. It reassesses previous debates and seeks to answer pressing questions of how we should understand the relationship between patriarchy and capitalism, and how we can envision a feminist project which emancipates both women and society.

With contributions from both renowned scholars and new voices, Marxism and Feminism is set to become the foundational text for modern Marxist-feminist thought.

Reviews

‘Marxism and Feminism is a serious, nuanced collection that covers a great deal of ground in a clear and concise way. The essays here represent a profoundly warm, human way of thinking through some of the toughest political problems of our age. It will be of great use to anyone thinking seriously about the relationship between Marx and feminism, not to mention gender, race, class, intersectionallity, patriarchy, work and many other key topics today.’
Nina Power, author of One Dimensional Woman

‘The relationship between Marxists and Feminists has always been problematic. But in these times of an ongoing crises of capitalism, when the whole world is looking for alternatives to the present destructive World System, Shahrzad Mojab’s Marxism and Feminism is especially necessary today. I hope that many women and men read it.
Maria Mies, author of Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale

‘Marxism and feminism are back! This book marks a refreshing return to basics after years spent in the wilderness of identity politics and the ‘cultural turn’. Offering a rich synthesis of the key concepts in both schools of thought, the book provides a valuable resource for rethinking Marxism, feminism, a renewed project for human emancipation and, yes… revolution.’
Radha D’Souza, University of Westminster

‘Marxism and Feminism is an outstanding contribution to the shared project of scholar-activists across diverse disciplines and movements. The collection is both the result of, and a significant contribution to, a (re)emerging conversation – one that attends to, as Shahrzad Mojab succinctly notes, ‘two major emancipatory projects.’ The keywords approach is inspired, providing breadth and depth in a single, accessible, and highly engaged volume.’
Abigail B. Bakan, University of Toronto

‘Reading this book made me aware of how much such a book is needed to awaken a dialogue between Marxism and feminism. I didn’t agree with all that I read, but that’s exactly what a book with this framework should do to awaken us.’
Dorothy Smith, University of Victoria

The Future Present

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

 

1 Introduction: Marxism and feminism

Shahrzad Mojab
Part One: Class and race in Marxism and feminism

2 Gender relations
Frigga Haug

3 The Marx within feminism
Frigga Haug

4 Building from Marx: reflections on ‘race’, gender and class
Himani Bannerji
Part Two: Marxist-feminist keywords

5 Democracy
Sara Carpenter

6 Financialization
Jamie Magnusson

7 Ideology
Himani Bannerji

8 Imperialism and primitive accumulation
Judith Whitehead
9 Intersectionality
Delia D. Aguilar

10 Labour-power
Helen Colley

11 Nation and nationalism
Amir Hassanpour

12 Patriarchy/patriarchies
Kumkum Sangari

13 Reproduction
Michelle Murphy

14 Revolution
Maryam Jazayeri

15 Standpoint theory
Cynthia Cockburn

16 Epilogue: gender after class
Teresa L. Ebert

Recommended reading
About the authors
Index

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Feminism

Feminism

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE 2015

FEMINISM & CRITICAL THEORY

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX, JUNE 20-21, 2015

In the face of enforced austerity, rampant and increasing inequality, systemic crises of political, economic and environmental organisation, and violence and injustice on a global scale, there has been a resurgence of interest in both feminism and critical theory, as ways of understanding and criticising the world as it is. That such disasters disproportionately affect women is not, of course, new, nor are they differentiated solely through gender – race, sexuality, dis/ability, class and nationality also come into play. Yet many have detected an increase in violence, both (and often simultaneously) material and symbolic, directed against women and gender non-conformists across the world. Examples range from the ‘pornification’ of an increasingly misogynist popular culture (and equally misogynist ‘moral panics’ about the threat posed to society by deviant sexualities), to brutal cuts to already embattled women’s services, to continued institutional discrimination and institutionalised abuse (Yarl’s Wood is just one site).

This has been met with resistance in a variety of forms, on the ground in social movements and protests, and in many recent theoretical developments both scholarly and popular, including: the republication of many classic Marxist and socialist feminist texts of the 1970s and 80s; important contemporary debates, situated within both analytic and continental philosophy, on how to challenge the patriarchal nature of philosophy as a discipline and as disciplinary ideology; the emergence of innovative new journals such as the materialist feminist LIES; and scholarly reappraisals of radical twentieth-century figures like Shulamith Firestone, Claudia Jones and Rosa Luxemburg.

This year’s Social and Political Thought conference will investigate ? the relationship between feminism and other critical social theories in light of these developments. We begin by recognising that the different schools (and historical ‘waves’) of feminist thought are themselves often divergent and opposed. Furthermore, we recognise that there is a certain level of ambivalence attached to the term ‘critical theory’. In the narrow sense, it can refer to theory influenced by the Frankfurt School and the work of Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse (and, on some interpretations, Habermas and Honneth). In the broad sense, on the other hand, it can refer to a group of interrelated, sometimes competing, social theories directed against the status quo, of which feminist thought is one strand. We view this ambivalence and its relationship to feminist theory and practice as potentially productive, and encourage submissions that deal with all kinds of feminism and their relationship to critical theory in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, including feminism as critical theory.

Possible approaches include but are not limited to: Marxist feminism or feminist thought engaging with Marxism; feminism, materiality, and ‘new materialisms’; feminist social movements and the politics of popular protest; feminism, police, and prisons; feminism and problems of universality; feminism and psychoanalysis; feminism and autonomism; anarchist feminism; post-crisis masculinities and feminism; postcolonialism and feminism; black British feminism; sexual, racial and social contracts; feminism and the politics and theory of intersectionality; feminism and nationalism; feminism and orientalism in the war on terror; ‘third wave’ feminism; feminism and new forms of slavery; feminism in the global South; feminism and poststructuralism;  feminism and communisation theory; feminism and LGBTQI struggles; feminism and sex-work; feminism and social reproduction; feminism and revolution.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Stella Sandford (Kingston University)

Lorna Finlayson (University of Cambridge)

 

We encourage submissions for both individual and full-panel presentations. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to ssptreviews@sussex.ac.uk by March 15 2015. In order to facilitate a double-blind review process, please send two separate attachments, one containing a short biographical note, and another containing your abstract with no identifying information.

See: https://ssptjournal.wordpress.com/social-and-political-thought-conference-june-20-21-2015/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

CONFERENCE ON MARXIST-FEMINISM IN BERLIN

An historic conference on Marxist-Feminism that will be taking place in collaboration with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in Berlin next March 20-22, 2015.

The draft programme has just been posted: www.rosalux.de/marxismus-feminismus

 

Speakers include (among others) Frigga Haug, Gayatri Spivak, Saskia Sassen, Lynn Segal, Nira Yuval-Davis, Zilla Eisenstein, Helen Colley, Shahrzad Mojab, Cynthia Cockburn, Erica Burman.

The event will also include the launch of the new book from Zed Press, Marxism and Feminism, with Shahrzad Mojab, Helen Colley, Cynthia Cockburn, and Frigga Haug.

Registration is via the ‘Anmeldeformular’ in red at the bottom of the conference page.

Please distribute to all your interested networks.  This will be a very important event to discuss the resurgence of Marxist-Feminist thought in recent years.

Best wishes

Helen

Helen Colley, MA (Oxon), PhD
Professor of Lifelong Learning and Director of Graduate Education, SEPD, University of Huddersfield
Visiting Professor of Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto.

 

The strength of Critique: Trajectories of Marxism – Feminism

International Congress

More than 40 years ago, feminists among Marxists in many countries spoke out. They criticized the concept of labour that was then commonly used in Marxism, they criticized value theory, views on domestic labour and the family, the way of dealing and interacting with each other and with the nature around us, on the economy and wars, visions of the future and the urge for liberation.
They triggered passionate debates – their criticism wasn’t totally ignored. But the work they have carried out on an international scale is far from complete. For some decades feminist Marxist debates subsided because neoliberalism, stumbling from one crisis to another, had brought other issues into focus.
Next year, in March 2015, we intend to pick up the threads. Many of those voices — and many who have since joined — will come together at a congress in order to investigate what has been left undone. We will discuss successes and defeats as well as new projects with the intention of finding out together what has been gained so far, what we need to continue working on, what new issues are on the agenda, and how we can bundle our energies to achieve worldwide resonance to our demand to intervene.
What remains as fundamental as almost half a century ago is that socialist feminists join forces internationally.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

 

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

HOW CAPITALISM SURVIVES? A MARXIST-FEMINIST PERSPECTIVE

Call for Papers within the framework of the 11th Historical Materialism Annual Conference ‘How Capitalism Survives’ – 6-9 November 2014 – Vernon Square, Central London

The Historical Materialism Annual Conference in London has emerged as a pivotal site for critical, engaged, constructive, and provocative scholarship and activism internationally. This is a fitting place for focusing the (re)emergence of Marxist-Feminist historical materialist analysis. Now in our third year at HM, the 2014 Marxist-Feminist stream of the conference is seeking contributions that continue in the tradition of dynamic and original reflections of previous years, and also those that press the boundaries and take on the bold challenges posed by debates old and new.

The question ‘how capitalism survives?’ resonates strongly with a range of feminist critiques on the Left. In the 21st century this question invites us to revisit of the history of capitalism and patriarchy in their myriad entanglements as well as to analyse the daily (re)construction of a globally dominant socio-economic model that thrives on gendered and racial asymmetries.

The Marxist-Feminist stream this year wishes to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that make the reproduction of capitalism possible in the very sites that constitute an ‘everyday life’ where exploitation and struggle are actualised or forestalled. We are also interested in analysing the continuities, discontinuities and mutations of the capitalism & patriarchy nexus from the age of empire all the way to contemporary neo-colonialisms. Such colonial projects may involve anything from territorially-based extraction of surplus value to the production of individual and collective subjectivities.

This year’s conference theme hopes to provide an opportunity to think in truly interdisciplinary fashion about how ‘we’ participate in sustaining capitalism as a reality of intersecting modalities of exploitation. To offer just one obvious example, today the exploitation of women by women has become indispensable to sustaining contemporary capitalism as a planetary biopolitics.

On the basis of the above, we invite papers that may address (but are not limited to) the following themes and/or questions, here presented in random order:

• Critical descriptions of capitalism across Marxism and feminism from feminism’s ‘first wave’ to the present
• Social reproduction and capitalist transformation: micro and macro-analyses
• Instances of success and failure in Marxist-Feminist struggles from the 19th to the 21st centuries
• In what particular ways does the ‘feminisation’ of labour help capitalism survive?
• Are new concepts and methodologies needed to understand women’s roles in capitalism’s ways of overcoming the recent crisis?
• How do the crises of capitalism help generate or overcome otherness (understood in gendered and/or racial terms)?
• Women and queer subjects’ roles in the rise of new capitalist economies and in the assumed decline of Western capitalism
• Homophobia and homonationalism before and after 9/11
• Moving borders, regenerating boundaries: states, bodies, temporality
• Ecosocialism, ecofeminism, ecology: narratives of change or scripts of subjugation?
• Revolution and reform in the theories of Marxist-feminism
• Racism, femonationalism, Islamophobia: the bigger picture
• Intersections of Marxism, feminism, critical race and postcolonial theories
• Sexual assault, rape and resistance
• Women in contemporary liberation struggles
• Marxist feminism and intersectionality theories
• Women’s art, film, music literature: subversion or reproduction of capitalist relations of production?
• Feminism and the reproduction of the capitalist art world
• Women in the communist/socialist tradition: Luxemburg, Zetkin, Kollontai, and others
• Welfare and the political economy of care
• Contemporary sexual politics: resistance to or empowerment of capitalism?
• Violence, fascism, Marxism and Feminism
• Separatism or participation? The case for the 21st century
• Feminism and the institutions of capitalism
• Gender, race and international migration
• Uniting forces: what would an interdisciplinary Marxist feminist theory look like?

Paper proposals should be max 200 words. When submitting your proposal, please indicate the theme to which your paper could contribute.

Please note that we welcome panel proposals. When you submit a panel proposal, please send an abstract of the general theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with the abstracts of the individual papers in the panel. For individual paper proposals, it is helpful to indicate the theme (above) to which your paper could contribute. This will help us to compose the panels. Panels and individual papers should be submitted by June 1st to: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual11/submit

Please be aware that the conference is self-funded; therefore we are unable to help with travel and accommodation costs.

Feminism

Feminism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Culture

Culture

ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, CULTURE – CALL FOR PAPERS

The Institute on Culture and Society: The Banff Centre for the Arts — June 13-17, 2014

The Institute on Culture and Society (ICS) invites the submission of papers on topics related to Marxism, critical theory, and Marxist views of literature. Submissions are welcome from all humanities and social scientific perspectives. Full submission details can be found at the end of this call.

Supplementing an ongoing engagement with Marxism, ICS 2014 welcomes submissions on this year’s special topic: “Energy, Environment, Culture” (EEC). This topic aims to facilitate discussion that moves beyond standard disputes over energy politics in Canada in order to develop sophisticated knowledge about the global relations, ecological realities, social reproduction, and community impacts of energy.

From debates on harnessing wind and solar power to the environmental effects of the tar sands, energy and power have a complex and under theorized connection to culture, politics, and society. Energy is understood in economic terms as the name for an input into market activity that can take a variety of forms and which is necessary for steady-state growth. In environmental thought, too, energy serves as a placeholder for a range of activities, practices and objects with inconsistent theoretical and scientific content. In both cases, energy is seen as fundamental to social life, even if the depth of its significance to the operations of society, and its role in implementing and maintaining particular sets of relationships across diverse communities, is poorly understood. What insights can Marxism lend ecology? Further, what insights can a Marxist-Feminist political economy develop in ecological thought? Approaching these problematics from a humanities perspective, we suggest innovative workshop, panel, and paper proposals on any of the following:

Energy and Globalization
 – regional economies, energy distribution, and the political climate of international markets
– the transnational and global relationship between eastern, western and northern economies in Canada vis-à-vis Pacific and Southern American partners and cultures
– cultural symptoms of energy and globalization or internationalism
– cultural and environmental interactions in energy intensive regions
– the interregional and provincial flows created by energy infrastructures and cultural development

Energy and Ecology
– updates to the established approach to energetics
– “New Materialisms” and the renewed interest in non-human agency in ecological research
– redirections of familiar environment vs. economy binary
– the diverse materialisms that link economics, energy, and ecology

Ecology and Marxist Feminism
 – practical, community- driven knowledges about energy systems and sustainability
– primitive accumulation (as an ongoing process coterminous with capital accumulation), gender, and the environment
– the work of Mariarosa Dalla Costa, Maria Mies and Silvia Federici
– capitalism, gender, and ecology
– social reproduction and/as energy
– the new work on gender and reproduction coming out in the journals Endnotes and Lies

ICS is run in consecutive sessions to encourage a developing conversation and increase potential research outputs and collaboration. Toward this end, participants are strongly encouraged to stay for the entirety of the conference. Significant subsidies will be available to graduate students and the underemployed.

We welcome submissions of papers, panels, pecha kucha presentations, roundtables, reading groups, and more. Please submit proposals of no more than 400 words in length, including title and affiliation, to mlgics2014@gmail.com. Panel or roundtable proposals should be introduced by a 100 word rational. If geared towards a specific stream, submissions should indicate which stream it most strongly relates to.

All submissions must be received by the 14th of March, 2014.

Please let us know if you would be interested in having childcare arranged.

The Banff Centre is a world-renowned facility supporting the creation and performance of new works of visual art, music, dance, theatre, and writing.

ICS 2014 is sponsored by ARIEL, Mediations, Reviews in Cultural Theory, the Marxist Literary Group, The University of Alberta (U of A) Faculty of Arts, U of A English and Film Studies, U of A Kule Institute for Advanced Study, ConcordiaUniversity, St. Francis Xavier, YorkUniversity, and the Banff Centre.

 

The Banff Centre: http://www.banffcentre.ca/

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

FEMINISMS AND MARXISMS

Feminisms and Marxisms: Connecting Struggles, Rethinking Limits
Call for Papers within the framework of the 10th Historical Materialism Conference, Making the World Working Class.
7-10 November 2013, London, SOAS.
Deadline: May 21

Abstracts for papers and panels should uploaded to:
http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual10/submit

(Visit http://feminismsandmarxisms.wordpress.com/)

Our present poses enormous political and analytical challenges to those committed to the struggle against the oppression and exploitation of women. It demands the creation of spaces for the development of an oppositional culture able to confront new forms of domination, rethink its own assumptions and foster serious political responses. One year ago Historical Materialism launched a call for papers on Feminisms and Marxisms with the aim to provide a space for a dialogue between Feminist and Marxist critiques of capitalism in their various articulations. The response to the call went beyond our most optimistic expectations, demonstrating the vitality and wealth of new research inspired by Marxist-Feminist approaches.

This call aims to build on last year’s discussions, giving voice to a new generation of anti-capitalist feminists and continuing a collective reflection about how Feminisms and Marxisms can together contribute to criticising and transforming the present. At this year’s conference, we aim to think beyond the issue of the compatibilities or tensions between Feminism and Marxism as separate traditions, and explore the way in which they provide the tools to intervene in contemporary debates about labour, oppression and power. We also hope to foster new approaches to old debates, from social reproduction to patriarchy, and advance the understanding of the historic limits and contemporary potentials of Marxist-Feminist theorisations of capitalism.

We welcome papers that address (but are not confined to) the following themes:
Marxist-Feminism in the 21st century
Social Reproduction Feminism and Intersectionality Theory
The Political Economy of Sex Work and Sex Workers’ Struggles
Class/Gender Intersections: Masculinities, LGBTQ, Queer Studies and Trans Politics.
Homophobia and Heteronormativity
Gendered Labour Exploitation
Feminist and Marxist critiques of Racism and Islamophobia
Marxist Feminism and Materialist Feminism
Securitization and Carceral Detention
Theories of Sexuality, Bodies, Embodiment
Feminisms, Marxisms and Art Theory
Gender, International Migration and the Political Economy of Care
Feminist-Marxist Critique of Sexual Violence
Diaspora, Indigeneity, and Solidarity in Marxisms and Feminisms
Inclusive Theories of Class and Resistance
Marxist-Feminist critiques of historical and 21st-century fascism
Feminism and Autonomist Marxism: Understanding the legacy
Marxism and Feminist economics

We welcome and encourage people to submit panel proposals. When you do so, please send an abstract of the general theme of the panel together with the abstracts of the individual papers in the panel. For individual paper proposals, it is helpful, although it is not necessary, to indicate the theme (above) to which your paper could contribute. This will help us to compose the panels.

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 5th JANUARY 2013

EVENTS

SPEED DATING FOR WORKERS’ RIGHTS

Monday, January 7, 2013
7:15pm – 10:00pm
417 Restaurant and Lounge
417 Danforth Ave., Toronto, ON

Fundraiser for the Workers’ Action Centre.

Speed dating, men & women, ages 30 – 40. Meet 12 – 14 singles in one evening while raising money for a worthy cause

Cost: $25 – Please bring cheques made out to the Workers’ Action Centre.

To sign up:  Send an email to justidateevents@gmail.com to reserve your spot.

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ONTARIO 2013: TOWARD A POST-AUSTERITY VISION

Wednesday, January 9, 2013
10:00am – 4:00pm (lunch included)
Thomas Lounge, Oakham House
Ryerson University Toronto, ON

Please join the CCPA [Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives] – Ontario for an update on the province’s economy and a strategy session focusing on how to move toward a post-austerity vision.

We’ll feature:
* Hugh Mackenzie, CCPA- Countering deficit hysteria: Ontario budget numbers post-Drummond
* Jim Stanford, CAW- Economic and jobs update
* Trish Hennessy, CCPA- Toward a post-austerity narrative
* Sectoral updates … and more!

Questions? Please contact Trish Hennessy: ccpaon@policyalternatives.ca
Register at http://ccpa-ontarioeconomicupdate-eac2.eventbrite.com

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ANTI-CAPITALISM AND FEMINISM

Saturday, January 12, 2013
7:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham Street
Toronto, ON

Join the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly for a ‘coffee house’ discussion on Anti-capitalism and Feminism

– Socialist Feminism in Canada: A Brief History — Meg Luxton
– Marxist Feminism: Keywords and Key Concepts — Shahrzad Mojab

Followed by Q and A and informal discussion.

This is the first of a three-part monthly series on anti-capitalism and feminism. Watch for future listings.

More about the speakers:
Meg Luxton: Professor and Director of the Graduate Program of Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University. Meg has been active in the women’s liberation movement, the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, and a range of campus and community groups. As a socialist feminist scholar she writes on feminist politics, women’s work (paid and unpaid), international effort to include women’s unpaid work in the UN and the history of the Canadian women’s movement, especially it’s left-wing currents.
Shahrzad Mojab: Professor in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education and Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto. Scholar, teacher, and activist, Shahrzad is internationally known for her work on the impact of war, displacement and violence on women’s learning and education. Her recent co-edited book, Educating from Marx: Race, Gender and Learning (2011, with Sara Carpenter, Palgrave McMillan ‘Marxism and Education’ Series) is an anti-racist feminist analysis of Marxism for a revolutionary feminist praxis. For more on this book see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/educating-from-marx-race-gender-and-learning-by-sara-carpenter-and-shahrzad-mojab/

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WORKERS RISING FROM WALMART TO MARIKANA PUBLIC

Tuesday, January 15, 2013
7:00pm – 8:30pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, room 8220
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON

Speakers:
– Elizabeth Clinton, OUR Walmart campaigner from Texas
– Ritch Whyman, International Socialists

While governments around the world try and push austerity and force the working class to pay for the economic crisis, workers continue to resist.

Showing that workers in some of the lowest paid service-sector jobs can organize and fight back, workers from Walmart and McDonald’s have held protests, wildcat strikes and campaigned for better wages. In South Africa, miners have bravely faced down police bullets in their struggle against their employers and government. Workers across Ontario are preparing to protest a Liberal government that is trying to impose wage freezes and cut their benefits.

Join a discussion on working class resistance, where we have been and where we are going.

Organized by the U of T International Socialists
Info: reports@socialist.ca

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COMMUNITY HEALTH FORUM: NEWCOMERS TO CANADA: MIGRATION, IMMIGRATION CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES

Wednesday, January 9, 2013
7 to 9 p.m.
Ramada Plaza Hotel
300 Jarvis Street, Toronto and online

Topics to be discussed:
-Ethnoracial diversity
-Getting to healthcare
-Navigating the system

More information: http://www.actoronto.org/home.nsf/pages/act.docs.2302

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FORCED MARRIAGE PROJECT – WORKSHOPS

The Forced Marriage Project (FMP) invites you to participate in a four part series of FREE training workshops for service providers, youth-focused agencies/groups, community-based organizations/groups, and volunteers.

The Forced Marriage Project (FMP) is a project of Agincourt Community Services Association, funded by Status Women Canada. We raise awareness about forced marriage in Canada through our website, newsletter, youth engagement initiatives, and training service providers and community members
in understanding and responding to cases of forced marriage.

#1: An Introduction to Forced Marriage
#2: Working with Parents
#3: Engaging Youth
#4: Intervention in Cases of Forced Marriage

For more info and to register: http://fmp-acsa.eventbrite.ca/

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COURSE AT RYERSON

The first course was taught by Winnie Ng and Deena Ladd over six full time days in the spring, 2012. There were 18 participants — the majority were front-line community workers in a variety of settings. The majority were sponsored by their employers to attend which made it possible for them to take the course. We had a great class that supported each other in their learning and the evaluations were very positive!

We are hoping people who are working in community agencies, unions, immigrant settlement agencies and neighbourhood centres, health centres, etc will be supported by their organizations to attend this course. The course will be examining models of community engagement, strategies of best practices, working from an anti-oppression practice, strengthening leadership skills, developing critical analysis and reflection on our own practice and understanding how to do this work in the context of inequalities and unequal power dynamics.

Please consider the following:
* If you are an executive director or manager – would you financially support one of your staff to attend this course?
* if you are in a leadership position, could you consider arranging a scholarship donation from your organization and sponsor a community leader to attend?
* If you are a front-line worker – do you want the space to learn, share strategies and strengthen the work you do with the communities you work with?
* If you work in a trade union – do you want to learn, share strategies and understand how to build connections with communities and the work you are doing?
* If you are a community activist – do you want the space to share strategies, learn about best practices and get support for the work you are doing?

Course CSWP 936 – Logistics: the course is $524 and will be 39 hours of instruction and fully credited by Ryerson University. The course is part of a new certificate in Community Engagement, Leadership and Development.

The class is 6-9pm and runs from Monday January 14 until Monday April 15.
There is no class on Monday February 18, Family Day.

For more information about The Chang School, or to register for the Certificate in Community Engagement, Leadership and Development, visit http://www.ryerson.ca/ce/community or contact directly. Phone: 416.979.5035, Email: ce@ryerson.ca

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THE “C-WORD”, A PUBLIC CONVERSATION ABOUT CAPITALISM

By Building Common Ground – Guelph

Sunday, January 27, 2013
1:00pm until 3:00pm
Bookshelf Cinema
41 Quebec Street, Guelph, ON

Sam Gindin and Leo Panitch, co-authors of a new new book entitled “The Making of Global Capitalism”, will initiate the next BCG public conversation on the relationship between capitalism, our economic and environmental crises and the implications for all those interested in building a better world.

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NEWS & VIEWS

ROBIN HOOD TAX WINS

Euro Parliament okays 11 nations’ plans to tax financial transactions.

Brussels (13 Dec. 2012) – The European Parliament has voted overwhelmingly in favour of a Financial Transactions Tax (FTT and commonly referred to as a Robin Hood Tax).

Read more: http://sgnews.ca/blog/2012/12/11/robin-hood-tax-wins/

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THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF HUGO CHÁVEZ

One of the main factors for the popularity of the Chávez Government and its landslide victory in this re-election results of October 2012, is the reduction of poverty, made possible because the government took back control of the national petroleum company PDVSA, and has used the abundant oil revenues, not for benefit of a small class of renters as previous governments had done, but to build needed infrastructure and invest in the social services that Venezuelans so sorely needed. During the last ten years, the government has increased social spending by 60.6%, a total of $772 billion.

Read more: http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/12/14/the-achievements-of-hugo-chavez/

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12 IDEAS TO STOP WAGE THEFT

Over the last 12 days of action, we [The Workers’ Action Centre] have profiled stories of workers fighting for unpaid wages. With your support, we have sent a powerful message to our government representatives that they need to stand up for stronger protections for workers in Ontario.

Read more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org/12-days-of-action/

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LEADERSHIP, FEMINISM AND EQUALITY IN UNIONS IN CANADA

This project explores the current climate and attitudes to women, feminism, leadership and equality in Canadian unions through the insights, voices and experiences of women union leaders, activists and staff. Women from seven provinces and territories were involved, including retired and still active staff, leaders and activists, racialized and Aboriginal women, lesbians and young women, and women from public and private sector unions and central labour bodies. Our findings do not address the situation in Québec.

The discussions were wide-ranging, analytical and deeply-moving. What emerged was a widespread consensus that there is a serious problem within the labour movement in advancing women’s equality work and supporting feminist activists at all levels. Union women, however, still share the optimistic belief that organized labour has played and can continue to play a critical role in challenging inequality.

Read more: http://womenunions.apps01.yorku.ca/

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ARTIST CREATES A VISION OF SOLIDARITY

Toronto – December 24, 2012 – There is a long history of mural art and the labour movement, and UFCW [United Food and Commercial Workers] Canada is helping that history continue.

This past July, more than a thousand agriculture workers gathered in Leamington, Ontario to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the first-ever Agriculture Workers Alliance support centre in Leamington, Ontario. To mark the occasion, UFCW Canada and the AWA commissioned Chilean-born, Canadian-based social activist artist Gilda Monreal to create a mural to honour the tens of thousands of migrant workers who toil each season in Canada’s agriculture sector.

Read more: http://www.ufcw.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3183%3Aartist-creates-a-vision-of-solidarity&catid=6%3Adirections-newsletter&Itemid=6&lang=en

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THE FUTURE FOR LONG-TERM CARE LOOKS GRIM: MASS PRIVATIZATION

As with hospital beds, the government and other proponents of the near freeze in new long-term care beds suggest that home care can take up the slack.

Does this stand up?  Well, let’s take even a very aggressive version of this theory. Say that 25% of all people in LTC could be dealt with through home care. (Currently, that would mean evicting 19,250 LTC residents.)

Read more: http://ochuleftwords.blogspot.ca/2012/12/the-future-for-long-term-care-looks.html

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CENTENNIAL OF 1912 “BREAD AND ROSES” STRIKE

The Bridge Review: Merrimack Valley Culture is an online journal about the culture of the Greater Merrimack Valley of Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire. Founded in 1997, the journal explores the interwoven concepts of place, nature, culture and society. Based at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the journal includes writing, visual art, music, video clips, and other creative and scholarly works relevant to our region.

This special edition of the Bridge Review is dedicated to the centennial of the 1912 Bread and Roses strike.

Read more: http://www.breadandrosesbridgereview.com/

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A PROPOSAL TO STRENGTHEN THE CANADA PENSION PLAN: THE 1.5 OPTION

Expanding the Canada Pension Plan is back on the table. The federal and provincial finance ministers have been exploring several proposals for expanding the CPP in a paper prepared by their officials.

When the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans were created in the mid-1960s, they were deliberately designed to pay relatively modest benefits. The reasoning was that the private tier of employer-sponsored pension plans and individual savings plans would play the lion’s share of the earnings replacement objective for middle- and upper-income Canadians.  The Achilles heel of Canada’s retirement income system is that private pension and savings plans never grew sufficiently to properly serve the earnings replacement objective for many Canadians.

The Caledon Institute for several years has been proposing a ‘1.5’ solution for expanding the Canada Pension Plan in which the Year’s Maximum Pensionable Earnings would increase by 50 percent and the earnings replacement rate would also rise by 50 percent.  We would raise the Year’s Maximum Pensionable Earnings level from its current $50,100 to $75,150 – an increase of one-half.  The earnings replacement rate would go from 25 to 37.5 percent – also an increase of 50 percent.  As a result, the maximum CPP benefit would more than double, from $11,840 to $28,181.

Read more: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/1002ENG.pdf

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MIGRANT WORKERS IN CANADA FACE DETERIORATING CONDITIONS

18 December 2012 – Today, International Migrants Day, the Canadian Council for Refugees expressed its concern about a series of changes over the past year that reduce migrant workers’ rights.  As a result many migrant workers in Canada are worse off than they were a year ago.

‘Things are going from bad to worse for the over 100,000 “low-skilled” migrant workers in Canada’, said Loly Rico, CCR President. “The Canadian Council for Refugees has deep concerns over the government’s approach to migrant workers as disposable, short-term labour with fewer rights and  protections than Canadian workers.”

Migrant workers in Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program are vulnerable to exploitation because of their temporary status and restrictions on their work permits. While the transition to permanent residence for “high-skilled” temporary foreign workers is being made faster and more flexible, “low-skilled” migrant workers still don’t have access to permanent residence.

Read more: http://ccrweb.ca/en/bulletin/12/12/18

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ONTARIO NEXT RIGHT-TO-WORK TARGET?

When Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed right-to-work bills into law last month, he gladdened the hearts of anti-union politicians next door in Ontario. Could our province, a union stronghold, be next?

The more unions are beaten back in the United States, the worse it is for Canadian workers, whose jobs can easily be shipped south. One need only look at Caterpillar’s Electro-Motive Diesel jobs being moved from London, Ontario, down to Indiana in 2012, after that state passed right-to-work legislation. Such laws outlaw contracts that require all those represented by a union to pay dues, thus breaking up solidarity.

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2013/01/ontario-next-right-work-target

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JOBS

SUMMER 2013 SESSIONAL TEACHING POSITIONS AT MCMASTER UNIVERSITY’S LABOUR STUDIES

The School of Labour Studies, McMaster University, invites applications for the following positions to be offered in the Summer 2013 session.

Read more: http://www.labourstudies.mcmaster.ca/jobs

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PROGRAM DIRECTOR, METCALF CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, TORONTO

The goal of the George Cedric Metcalf Charitable Foundation is to enhance the effectiveness of people and organizations working together to help Canadians imagine and build a just, healthy, and creative society.

Across its 3 programs areas — sustaining the vibrancy of the professional performing arts, harnessing the benefits of living within the Earth’s environmental limits, and improving low-income peoples’ economic livelihoods and access to quality jobs — the Metcalf Foundation advances its mission through practice, policy, and collaboration.

Responsibilities

The Program Director holds primary responsibility for the vision, strategic development, and implementation of all aspects of the Inclusive Local Economies Program, and contributes to the Foundation’s broader mission and mandate including the Innovation Fellowship Program

See complete job posting at http://metcalffoundation.com

To apply or recommend candidates for the position please contact Ruth Richardson of Open Blue Consulting, in confidence, at ruth@openblue.ca Interested candidates should send their expression of interest by Monday 7 January 2013, 5:00 PM EST to ruth@openblue.ca

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ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR IN CONTINUING AND COLLEGE EDUCATION

The Woodring College of Education invites dynamic and innovative educators to apply for a tenure-track position (open-rank) in the Master of Education Continuing and College Education (CCE) Program, beginning September 2013.

The successful candidate will be visionary and collaborative with other professional educators, students and alumni. She/he will maintain a strong record of scholarship and will be a leading educator. Additionally, she/he will support student professional development projects and assist students to be competitive in the market for teaching in higher education, directing training and staff development for business, industry, government and professional associations and as administrators of programs for adults, especially in colleges, technical schools and university settings. 

For more information, please visit: https://jobs.wwu.edu/JobPosting.aspx?JPID=3860

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

Raya Dunayevskaya

MARXISM AND FEMINISM: PAST AND PRESENT

Marxism and Feminism, Past and Present: On Helen Macfarlane, Rosa Luxemburg and Raya Dunayevskaya

London Public Meeting

Thursday 8 November 2012

7.30 pm at The Lucas Arms, 245a Grays Inn Road, King’s Cross, London, WC1X 8QZ (5 mins. Kings Cross Tube)

 

Speakers:

Heather Brown, author of Marx on Gender and the Family: A Critical Study

Sandra Rein, author of Reading Dunayevskaya: Engaging the Emergence of Marxist Humanism, 1930-1955

David Black, author of Helen Macfarlane: A Feminist, Revolutionary Journalist and Philosopher in Mid-19th Century England; and co-author (with Chris Ford) of 1839: The Chartist Insurrection

Meeting sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization.

ALL WELCOME

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

David Black & Chris Ford

Revolution at Point Zero

REVOLUTION AT POINT ZERO: HOUSEWORK, REPRODUCTION AND FEMINIST STRUGGLE

Book Launch

Silvia Federici launches Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction and Feminist Struggle.

12 November, 6pm, LG02, New Academic Building, Goldsmiths University, Lewisham Way, SE14 6NW, near New Cross station.

 

Written between 1974 and the present, Revolution at Point Zero collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles on this terrain—to escape it, to better its conditions, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations.

Indeed, as Federici reveals, behind the capitalist organization of work and the contradictions inherent in “alienated labor” is an explosive ground zero for revolutionary practice upon which are decided the daily realities of our collective reproduction.

Beginning with Federici’s organizational work in the Wages for Housework movement, the essays collected here unravel the power and politics of wide but related issues including the international restructuring of reproductive work and its effects on the sexual division of labor, the globalization of care work and sex work, the crisis of elder care, the development of affective labor, and the politics of the commons.

Praise:

“Finally we have a volume that collects the many essays that over a period of four decades Silvia Federici has written on the question of social reproduction and women’s struggles on this terrain. While providing a powerful history of the changes in the organization of reproductive labor, Revolution at Point Zero documents the development of Federici’s thought on some of the most important questions of our time: globalization, gender relations, the construction of new commons.”
Mariarosa Dalla Costa, coauthor of The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community and Our Mother Ocean

“As the academy colonizes and tames women’s studies, Silvia Federici speaks the experience of a generation of women for whom politics was raw, passionately lived, often in the shadow of an uncritical Marxism. She spells out the subtle violence of housework and sexual servicing, the futility of equating waged work with emancipation, and the ongoing invisibility of women’s reproductive labors. Under neoliberal globalization women’s exploitation intensifies—in land enclosures, in forced migration, in the crisis of elder care. With ecofeminist thinkers and activists, Federici argues that protecting the means of subsistence now becomes the key terrain of struggle, and she calls on women North and South to join hands in building new commons.”
Ariel Salleh, author of Ecofeminism as Politics: Nature, Marx, and the Postmodern

“The zero point of revolution is where new social relations first burst forth, from which countless waves ripple outward into other domains. For over thirty years, Silvia Federici has fiercely argued that this zero point cannot have any other location but the sphere of reproduction. It is here that we encounter the most promising battlefield between an outside to capital and a capital that cannot abide by any outsides. This timely collection of her essays reminds us that the shape and form of any revolution are decided in the daily realities and social construction of sex, care, food, love, and health. Women inhabit this zero point neither by choice nor by nature, but simply because they carry the burden of reproduction in a disproportionate manner. Their struggle to take control of this labor is everybody’s struggle, just as capital’s commodification of their demands is everybody’s commodification.”
Massimo De Angelis, author of The Beginning of History: Values, Struggles, and Global Capital

“In her unfailing generosity of mind, Silvia Federici has offered us yet another brilliant and groundbreaking reflection on how capitalism naturalizes the exploitation of every aspect of women’s productive and reproductive life. Federici theorizes convincingly that, whether in the domestic or public sphere, capital normalizes women’s labor as ‘housework’ worthy of no economic compensation or social recognition. Such economic and social normalization of capitalist exploitation of women underlies the gender-based violence produced by the neoliberal wars that are ravaging communities around the world, especially in Africa. The intent of such wars is to keep women off the communal lands they care for, while transforming them into refugees in nation-states weakened by the negative effects of neoliberalism. Silvia Federici’s call for ecofeminists’ return to the Commons against Capital is compelling. Revolution at Point Zero is a timely release and a must read for scholars and activists concerned with the condition of women around the world.”
Ousseina D. Alidou, Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa (CAFA), Director of the Center for African Studies at Rutgers University and author of Engaging Modernity: Muslim Women and the Politics of Agency in Postcolonial Niger

About Silvia Federici:

Silvia Federici is a feminist writer, teacher, and militant. In 1972, she was cofounder of the International Feminist Collective, which launched the Wages for Housework campaign internationally. With other members of Wages for Housework, like Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James, and with feminist authors like Maria Mies and Vandana Shiva, Federici has been instrumental in developing the concept of “reproduction” as a key to class relations of exploitation and domination in local and global contexts, and as central to forms of autonomy and the commons.

In the 1990s, after a period of teaching and research in Nigeria, she was active in the anti-globalization movement and the U.S. anti-death penalty movement. She is one of the co-founders of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, an organization dedicated to generating support for the struggles of students and teachers in Africa against the structural adjustment of African economies and education systems. From 1987 to 2005, she also taught international studies, women’s studies, and political philosophy courses at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY.

Her decades of research and political organizing accompanies a long list of publications on philosophy and feminist theory, women’s history, education, culture, international politics, and more recently on the worldwide struggle against capitalist globalization and for a feminist reconstruction of the commons. Her steadfast commitment to these issues resounds in her focus on autonomy and her emphasis on the power of what she calls self-reproducing movements as a challenge to capitalism through the construction of new social relations.

Product Details:

Author: Silvia Federici
Publisher: PM Press/Common Notions/Autonomedia
ISBN: 978-1-60486-333-8
Published September 2012
Format: Paperback
Size: 8 by 5
Page count: 208 Pages
Subjects: Women’s Studies/Politics/Sociology

Revolution at Point Zero at PM Press: https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=420

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

FEMINISMS AND MARXISMS

Call for Papers: In the framework of the 9th Historical Materialism Conference, ‘Weighs like A Nightmare’, SOAS, Central London, 8-11 November 2012

Feminisms and Marxisms 

A new generation of anti-capitalist feminists has emerged in the last years across the world. Although not without tensions and disagreements, these new feminist currents have been in constant dialogue with different traditions of Marxism and the Marxist critique of political economy in areas ranging from social science, philosophy to art history. With the aim of providing a space for this dialogue, the 9th Historical Materialism conference inLondonwelcomes presentations exploring the synergies between the feminist and the Marxist critiques of capitalism in their various articulations. 

Paper proposals (between 200 and 300 words) should be submitted by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences BEFORE 10 May 2012. Submissions will be peer reviewed. Please be aware that the conference is self-funded therefore we are unable to help with travel and accommodation costs.

Themes of particular interest for the conference include:

      Marxist and Socialist feminism in the 21st century

      The critique of the political economy of sex work

      Autonomia and Feminism: A legacy?

      Intersectionality theory and Marxism

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of liberal feminism

      Queer studies, LGBTQ and Marxism

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of gendered labour exploitation

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of racism and Islamophobia

      The political economy of gender and carceral detention

      Feminism, Marxism and art theory

      Women’s collectives and the contemporary art world

      Feminist, Marxism and the visual cultures of globalisation

      Gendered international migrations

      Commodification of care

      Social reproduction

Please note that the following donations are requested in support of conference costs:

£50 waged/15 unwaged on pre-registration
£75 waged / 25 unwaged at the door

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

EDUCATING FROM MARX: RACE, GENDER, AND LEARNING – BY SARA CARPENTER AND SHAHRZAD MOJAB

Series: Marxism and Education

Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN-10: 0230115810

ISBN-13: 978-0230115811

270 pages; hardback

 

This text is an articulation of a renewed Marxist-feminist framework for adult education. In recent years adult educators have been working to develop an important body of literature on neo-liberalism, capitalism, and imperialism. Many of these analyses draw on various strands of Marxist theorizing. With the exception of Jane Thompson’s work as an early socialist feminist, a Marxist-Feminist framework has yet to be articulated for adult education. This text combines original empirical studies with literature review from critical adult education and feminist theory to examine the sites, theories, and practices of adult education from a Marxist-Feminist perspective.  

Contents:

PART I: MARXIST-FEMINISTS ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE

Introduction: A Specter Haunts Adult Education: Crafting a Marxist-Feminist Framework for Adult Education & Learning; Sara Carpenter & Shahrzad Mojab

Ideology, Science, and Social Relations: A Reinterpretation of Marx’s Epistemology; Dorothy E. Smith

Building from Marx: Reflections on ‘Race’, Gender, and Class; Himani Bannerji

PART II: MARXIST-FEMINIST PRAXIS

Examining the Social Relations of Learning Citizenship: Citizenship and Ideology in Adult Education; Sara Carpenter

Learning to Mentor Young People: A Saintly Vocation or an Alienating Experience?; Helen Colley

Exploring the Social Relations of Class Struggle in the OntarioMinimum Wage Campaign; Sheila Wilmot

The Ideological Construction of ‘Canadian Work Experience’: Adult Education and the Reproduction of Labor and Difference; Bonnie Slade

PART III: MARXIST-FEMINISM, IMPERIALISM, AND CULTURE

Adult Education in/and Imperialism; Shahrzad Mojab

Materiality and Memory: A Marxist-Feminist Perspective on the ‘Cultural Turn’ in Adult Education; Tara Silver 

Epilogue: Living Revolution, Learning Revolution, Teaching Revolution; Shahrzad Mojab & Sara Carpenter

 

SHAHRZAD MOJAB Professor in the Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Canada.
SARA CARPENTER is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Adult Education & Counselling Psychology at theUniversity ofToronto’s OISE,Canada.

“Congratulations to the editors and other outstanding contributors to this exemplary text. The collaborative project that underpinned and drove the production of this work is clearly evident throughout: therefore, in one text we find the critically analytical/theoretical coherence one expects from a single-authored text with the added benefit of that coherence being brought to bear on a multiplicity of contexts that only a multiple-authored text can provide. An amazing contribution to critical revolutionary praxis inspired and informed by Marx” — Paula Allman, author of Critical Education Against Global Capitalism: Karl Marx and Revolutionary Critical Education

At Palgrave Macmillan: http://us.macmillan.com/book.aspx?isbn=9780230115811

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333664978&sr=1-1

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Social Justice

MATERIALIST FEMINISMS IN AN AGE OF NEOLIBERALISM

Materialist Feminisms in an age of Neoliberalism; or, Would the critique of patriarchal capitalism please stand up?

A special issue of the online journal Politics and Culture (http://www.politicsandculture.org)

***Please Note: In addition to article-length contributions, we also solicit shorter interventions, provocations, or position papers (1500-2000 words) for two themed discussions 1) experiences and direction from elders in this work and 2) experiences and demands from junior scholars.

Liberal inclusion. Globalization and neoliberal crisis. Neoconservative backlash. We know that feminism has had many lives. We are especially attuned to the forms of imperialist, settler and liberal “feminism” that have motivated a great many social projects, most recently the ostensible concern over the status of women in Afghanistan that has played so well as a rationale for war. And yet, we live amidst a rapidly accelerating culture of neoliberal individualism, combined with the virulent cult of persecuted white masculinity that marks the neoconservative shift, the backlash against supposed minority gains, and the dogged attack by the state and corporate elite on the material and social protections won through decades of struggle. The need for anti-capitalist feminist foment has never been so dire.

From early noted thinkers such as Lucy B. Parsons, Rosa Luxembourg and Emma Goldman, to Marxist Feminist scholars such as Maria Mies, Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Giovanna Dalla Costa, Angela Davis and Sylvia Federici, to anti-racist and anti-colonialist scholars such as bell hooks, Himani Bannerji, Patricia Monture Angus, Vandana Shiva, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Andrea Smith, to theorists such as Zillah Eisenstein, Wendy Brown, and Nancy Fraser, “structuralist” or “materialist” feminisms draw a lineage that views economics, capitalism and political struggles specifically through the lenses of gender, race and class, and anti-imperialist, anti-patriarchal, anti-heteronormative and anti-racist agendas. While the distinctions are far too subtle and complex to enumerate here, critical to Marxist, socialist, anarchist, materialist and other kinds of structuralist feminism is the notion that ending gender-based oppression requires (among other things) a reckoning of capitalist, colonial and patriarchal histories and organizations of power. We invite a forward-looking conversation that draws trajectories in the body of work we might broadly think of as structural or materialist feminisms.

Topics for consideration may include:
* In a neoliberal age in which the ecological collapse wreaked by capitalism’s rapacious appetite appears as an urgent horizon framing cultural politics, what is to be gained or lost by prioritizing gender as a category of analysis? What is the task ahead for materialist feminism?
* The contemporary backlash
* Where is the work of structural feminism taking place? Do you observe or practice it in the university, in the streets, in your creative work, in your everyday life relations and survival?
* Identity politics vs. anti-capitalist struggle: whose schism?
* Women and the gift, women for the land, women and the spirit
* Queer materialisms
* Is there a materialist feminism outside of struggle? And is there a struggle?
* From “Marxist feminism” to transnational, anti-imperialist, anti-racist, anti-capitalist, anti-colonial feminist?  There is a story that has been told many ways many times and yet not told nearly enough: history and future of structural feminisms? Revisiting feminist theory, women’s studies, institutionalization, ghettoization, backlash, disciplinarity

****In addition to article-length contributions, we also solicit shorter interventions or provocations (1500-2000 words) for two themed discussions 1) experiences and direction from elders in this work and 2) experiences and demands from junior scholars.

Please send 200 word abstracts and/or short queries to Alyson McCready (alyson.mccready@gmail.com) or Mary Ellen Campbell (campbeme@mcmaster.ca) by April 1st, 2011.

Submissions will be expected May 15th, 2011.
 
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Feminism