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Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 27th JANUARY 2013

EVENTS

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2013 ALAN THOMAS FELLOWSHIP

We are pleased to announce the call for applications for the 2013 Alan Thomas Fellowship to Promote Civil Society and Voluntary Action. The Fellowship was first awarded in 2008, and there are now seven Fellowship recipients whose research and reflection has made a significant contribution towards strengthening leadership for civil society and promoting greater understanding of the importance of voluntary action. The Fellowship will again be awarded in 2013 to a leader in the NGO/not-for-profit sector who would not normally have access to a sabbatical leave. Valued at a maximum amount of $60,000 for up to one year, the award is intended to allow the recipient, at a transitional moment in his or her career, to make a contribution to the sector, through research and reflection.

In recognition of a shared desire to strengthen and support leadership capacity in the voluntary sector as an essential element in advancing development and positive social change, both locally and internationally, the Carold Institute and Cuso International are now working together to promote our respective Fellowship opportunities.

Visit our websites at http://www.carold.ca and http://cusointernational.org/content/bob-ward-memorial-fellowship for fuller detail on the Fellowships and on past recipients. The new deadline for applications is March 29, 2013, and the 2013 recipients will be announced in June 2013. Please publicize both these Fellowship as widely as possible within your membership and among your networks, and strongly encourage any potential candidates to apply.

For further information, please contact Juliet Huntly at the address below.
The Carold Institute
Alan Thomas Fellowship
Secretariat
Ph: (613) 376-3391   email: jhuntly@kos.net

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BUILDING A FUTURE FOR WOMEN IN TRADES: 2013 FORUM IN HAMILTON

The Provincial Women’s Access to Trades Network is pleased to invite you to our 2013 forum…

Building a Future for Women in Trades
Moving forward through collaboration and partnership

Thursday, February 28, 2013
8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Mohawk College STARRT Institute
481 Barton Street, Stoney Creek (click here for a map:
http://www.mohawkcollege.ca/Assets/Documents/Maps/STARRT+Stoney+Creek+PDF+Map.pdf

For more information on the event or to register please visit: http://thecentre.on.ca/pwatn

The Provincial Women’s Access to Trades Network (PWATN) is a collaboration of organizations dedicated to accelerating women’s participation in non‑traditional trades in order to increase women’s access to good jobs and decrease their risk of poverty.

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A WORKERS’ HISTORY OF THE 1970s: A FILM SERIES

6 weeks starting 7 February
7pm-midnight
Double Double Land
209 Augusta Ave., Toronto

Although the sixties are looked at as the high watermark of radicalism and rebellion in North America, it is actually the decade that followed that saw the highest frequency of labour unrest and worker militancy since the era of the depression. It was during these years that the power of organized labour was at its height, and the intra-union struggle of rank-and-file workers came the closest to realizing a true integration of the race- and gender-based social movements born of the 60s with the traditional American labour movement. Arguably, it was the failure to do so that made the crushing of labour’s power in the latter half of the decade possible, quickly ushering in the era of neo-liberalism that has prevailed to this day. Will an understanding of the past help put us back in control of our future?

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly in partnership with the Foundation for Social Economics is proud to present a six-week film series spotlighting some of the now nearly forgotten labour-themed cinema of the 1970s. Each film will be preceded by a short talk detailing an episode from that decade’s labour history.

Films (subject to change):  ‘JOE’ [1970]; ‘THE ROWDYMAN’ [1972]; ‘THE MOLLY MAGUIRES’ [1976]; ‘F.I.S.T.’ [1978]; ‘BLUE COLLAR’ [1978]; ‘NORMA RAE’ [1979].

Free: donations accepted
Beverages for sale
Social following each film

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CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS: THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING HIGHER EDUCATION

The Journal of Continuing Higher Education (JCHE) announces a Call for Manuscripts for its upcoming issues. JCHE strives to support continuing higher education by serving as a peer reviewed forum for the reporting and exchange of information based on research, observations, and professional experience relevant to the field. Issues are published in the winter, spring, and fall. JCHE is published by Routledge.

The Journal of Continuing Higher Education considers four types of articles:

Major articles—current research, theoretical models, conceptual treatments—of up to 7,000 words on:
• organization and administration of continuing higher education
• development and application of new continuing education program directions
• adult and non-traditional students
• continuing education student programs and services
• research within continuing higher education and related fields

Manuscripts should demonstrate implications for both the theory and practice of continuing higher education.

“Best Practices” articles of up to 4,000 words. These “Best Practice” articles contain descriptions of new, innovative, and successful programs or practices. The programs or practices should be replicable and of significance to continuing education.

• Book reviews of current publications in the field–prospective authors are advised to consult with the editor prior to preparing book reviews.

• Opinion pieces of up to 2,000 words addressing issues directly relevant to continuing higher education.

For best consideration for the Spring 2013 issue, manuscripts should be received by March 15, 2013. Manuscript submission guidelines are available online at http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t908610301 or through ACHE’s website: http://www.ACHEinc.org. Potential authors should feel free to consult with JCHE editor James K. Broomall, University of Delaware. He can be reached at jbroom@udel.edu or (302) 831-2795.

Please share this announcement with colleagues and graduate students who may be interested in submitting manuscripts to JCHE. The Journal has published outstanding graduate student work in the past.

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NEWS & VIEWS

CANADA’S CEOS BREAKING OUT THE BUBBLY

from Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

In our annual look at CEO compensation, we find Canada’s highest paid 100 CEOs had reason to break out the bubbly: by 1:18pm on January 2nd, the first official working day of the year, Canada’s top 100 CEOs had already pocketed $45,448. It takes the average Canadian an entire year of full-time work to earn that.

This year, we produced a short factsheet, Overcompensating: Executive Pay in Canada, which highlights some key numbers around executive pay in Canada and also includes a list of Canada’s highest paid 100 CEOs. Download the factsheet here: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/overcompensating

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THE MAN WHO COULD HAVE SAVED ORGANIZED LABOR

by Alec Macgillis, New Republic

It has been a dispiriting year for organized labor. Unions contributed greatly to the re-election of Barack Obama and the Democrats’ retention of the Senate, but were punched in the gut before they could savor the victories. Michigan’s Republican legislature and governor rushed a bill through the lame-duck session, making the birthplace of the United Auto Workers a “right-to-work” state.

Few have fought harder to keep labor from this plight than Jerry Tucker. An outspoken dissident, Tucker urged an alternate course for American unions for more than three decades, one with a broader progressive message and greater empowerment of rank and file workers. Labor could desperately use Tucker’s guidance today, but it’s too late: He died in his hometown of St. Louis on October 19 of pancreatic cancer, at age 73.

Read more: http://www.newrepublic.com/blog/alec-macgillis/111488/the-man-who-tried-save-organized-labor#

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VIDEO: BUGGER THE BANKERS

The Austerity Allstars present: Bugger the Bankers – The Official Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WSIUf2hD6Io

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SUBSIDIES AND CONCESSIONS: THE NEVER-ENDING CORPORATE SHAKE-DOWN

by Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin, The Bullet

Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s first economic policy initiative of 2013, which took him to Oakville in early January to trumpet yet another $250-million in auto subsidies, ought to raise some very fundamental questions. The heady free market rhetoric of recent decades was often cast in terms of the economic benefits associated with multinational corporations escaping the confines of nation states by being able to go global. In fact, what economic globalization has really been about has been the ability of these corporations to rely on the support of so many more states than ever before. And they have secured such state support while using the whip of competitiveness to discipline their workers – and to discard them when convenient.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/764.php

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MARTIN LUTHER KING WAS A RADICAL, NOT A SAINT

by Peter Dreier, Common Dreams

Today Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is viewed as something of an American saint. His birthday is a national holiday. His name adorns schools and street signs. Americans from across the political spectrum invoke King’s name to justify their beliefs and actions, as President Barack Obama will no doubt do in his second Inaugural speech and as gun fanatic Larry Ward recently did in outrageously claiming that King would have opposed proposals to restrict access to guns.

So it is easy to forget that in his day, in his own country, King was considered a dangerous troublemaker.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/01/21-2

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VIDEO AND PRESENTATION: ANTI-CAPITALISM AND FEMINISM

Moderated by Abbie Bakan.

Presentations:

• “Socialist Feminism in Canada: A Brief History.” Meg Luxton is Professor and Director of the Graduate Program of Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University.
• “Marxist Feminism: Keywords and Key Concepts.” Shahrzad Mojab is Professor in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education and Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto.

Presented by the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly.

Watch the video: http://www.workersassembly.ca/node/212

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ON THE STREET AT UALE (UNITED ASSOCIATION OF LABOR EDUCATION) 2013

We look forward to welcoming you all to Toronto in April. Please make sure to bring some sensible shoes (along with your passports), since you will have four chances for educational walks during the conference.

Here is the current plan:
On the Street at UALE 2013

• Why are we doing this? Because we know that workers and educators both learn as much from experiences as from formal conference presentations.

• Who is doing this? A lively group of eight people is writing the programs and will guide them, using as a starting point the publication “Mapping Our Work: Toronto Labour History Walking Tours”, prepared by the School of Labour at George Brown College and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 79, with support from Toronto’s Labour Council. All are active in union, community, arts and equality struggles. Copies of that publication will be provided to all conference participants.

• Where will they go? All walks leave from the lobby of the Metropolitan Hotel.

(1) Toronto’s Old Town (2.5 hours, including lunch): The first one (for which we request advance registration and payment of $20) leaves at 9:30 on Wednesday morning, and tours sites of the earliest labour struggles in Toronto’s “old town.”

(2) “The Ward” (1 hour): The second walk leaves at 5:00 pm on Wednesday, and takes participants to various close by sites in the historic “St John’s Ward” neighbourhood, where successive generations of immigrants arrived. The tour ends at the Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, for a reception, dinner and a labour arts program.

(3) Union Station (2.5 hours, including lunch): The third walking tour leaves at noon on Thursday and goes through Toronto’s historic railway station, Union Station, to highlight the history of African-Canadian workers.

(4) Spadina Avenue (2.5 hours, including dinner): The fourth tour leaves on Friday at 5:30 p.m. to explore Spadina Avenue, with its rich history of labour militancy, political struggles, and the contributions of Jewish and Chinese-Canadian workers’ organizing.

• Should we reserve? As people register for the conference on-line, they can pay $20 to confirm their participation in the first tour. Before leaving on that Wednesday morning tour, we ask that participants check in and pick up their conference kit. That way, they can avoid line-ups at the desk, and return comfortably in time for the conference opening. Part of that check in process will allow for reserving other outings, so that we can plan the number of guides and confirm reservations for meals.

• How much will tours cost? We are trying to get union sponsorships for all four events. At most, the programs will cost $20 each, with a meal included.

• Will the timing interfere with the regular program? For the second walk, people will leave after the conference plenary session, and end at the site of the evening reception and dinner. For the third, timing might be tight, and depending on the number of participants we may delay the start of the afternoon sessions by a few minutes. For the fourth, the walk starts after the end of the UALE membership meeting, which should be shorter than usual since there are no elections this year. Depending on that, the walk may start as early as 5:00.

• What if walking is hard for me? These outings are designed as walks, and will be challenging for people with limited mobility. Some may prefer to take a taxi from the hotel directly to and from the location of the meal. Some may prefer to stay in the hotel, for informal networking and evening film screenings on Thursday and Friday. For a special treat, on the second floor of the hotel is one of Canada’s best Chinese restaurants, Lai Wah Heen, expensive but fabulous.

For more info on UALE’s April 17-20, 2013 conference in Toronto: http://uale.org/conference/conference-2013

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Black Power

THE FIRE EVERY TIME: REFRAMING BLACK POWER ACROSS THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND

 

A PUBLIC HISTORY CONFERENCE AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

 

On September 21st & 22nd, 2012, the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture will host a public history symposium and community event on the topic of “The Fire Every Time: Reframing Black Power Across the Twentieth Century and Beyond”.

 

RATIONALE

In his 1963 collection of essays, The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin reflected on the expulsion of African Americans from the “American Dream” of economic opportunity, political equality, and social belonging.   Rather than be daunted by what Baldwin called “the center of this dreadful storm, this vast confusion,” he connected the present and future struggles of Black people to their past:  “I know that what I’m asking is impossible. But in our time, as in every time, the impossible is the least that one can demand—and one is, after all, emboldened by the spectacle of human history in general, and American Negro history in particular, for it testifies to nothing less than the perpetual achievement of the impossible.”

In our contemporary age, where some have claimed the nation has achieved the “impossible” through the election of Barack Obama as the nation’s first African-American president, we ask scholars, activists, and artists to re-conceptualize the twentieth century through the lens of past, present, and future struggles for Black Power, which in the words of James Baldwin spread as a “fire” every time.

 

CONFERENCE AGENDA

The conference will feature two plenary panels, two roundtable panels, and fourteen paper presentation panels on such topics as policing, incarceration, higher education, Black arts and cultural institutions, the military, self-defense, images and iconography of the Black Panther Party, inter-racial alliances and “Rainbow” coalitions, religion, nationalism, trans-nationalism and global impact of Black Power, and film and documentary film-making.

 

PLENARY & ROUNDTABLE SPEAKERS

PLENARY Session: State of the Field
Yohuru Williams (Fairfield University), Peniel Joseph (Tufts University), Donna Murch (Rutgers University), Hasan Jeffries (The Ohio State University), Rhonda Williams (Case Western Reserve University).

PLENARY Session: Activists Then and Now
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Herman Blake (Medical University of South Carolina & Scholar Activist), Millicent Brown (Claflin University & Scholar Activist), James Campbell (Community Leader and Organizer), Osei Terry Chandler (Community Leader).

ROUNDTABLE: Reframing the Orangeburg Massacre: Protest and Police Reprisals
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Judy Richardson (Director & Former SNCC Activist), Jack Shuler (Denison University), Jack Bass (College of Charleston).

ROUNDTABLE Film Excerpt Screenings: Black Power on Film: Documentaries, Hollywood, and Filmmaking
Portia Cobb (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno (Director,Revolution ’67), Judy Richardson, (Former SNCC Activist & Film Director, Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968).

ROUNDTABLE: The Longue Durée: Black Power from the Nineteenth Century to the 1990′s
Van Gosse (Franklin Marshall College), Deborah Gray White (Rutgers University), Curtis Austin(The OhioStateUniversity).

 

“ORANGEBURG MASSACRE”

We will also feature a special roundtable on the “Orangeburg Massacre of 1968” during which three African American students were killed by state police in Orangeburg during a civil rights protest of a segregated bowling alley.  This event was quite similar to the KentState shooting of 1971, and yet received little national media attention.  We hope to rectify the media’s lack of attention by bringing together Dr. Cleveland Sellers, a protest organizer and now president of VoorheesCollege, with two recent and noted authors on the incident, namely Jack Bass and Dr. Jack Shuler, and a documentary filmmaker, Judy Richardson, who will show her film on the Orangeburg Massacre of 1968.   This promises to be a valuable and important discussion on a pressing matter of South Carolina’s history that has dominated the history books, but not public dialogue.

POLITICAL AND COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

Although our community conference and gathering considers the history of African American politics and activism in Charleston, the Lowcountry, and beyond, we also consider how these topics have manifested in the contemporary world, a matter of pressing and national importance as the nation considers the reelection of the country’s first Black president.  Importantly, these scholars aim to create a dialogue with the audience that will think about how civil rights organizing and Black Power activism has fundamentally reshaped and broadened American democracy and citizenship for all peoples.

PUBLIC HISTORY AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

Altogether, we will bring together over 50 of the country’s top scholars on African American history and culture alongside activists and community members.  This represents a seminal gathering and a rare opportunity to create a memorable dialogue.  Far too often historians and scholars are seen as being removed from the general public and we hope to bridge that distance by creating a unique public history seminar and community gathering.  In addition to offering two-days of plenary speakers, roundtable panels, and presentations, this conference also features documentary film and a juried art exhibition. 

Please come join what will be an engaging conference and conversation.

 

For additional information contact:
Dr. Robert Chase
chasert@cofc.edu
843.953.7609

Conference Registration information

Hotel Information

 

For General Conference Information email: averyconferences@gmail.com

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-fire-every-time-reframing-black-power-across-the-twentieth-century-and-beyond-charleston-sc-21-22-september  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Situationism

THE BEACH BENEATH THE STREET: THE EVERYDAY LIFE AND GLORIOUS TIMES OF THE SITUATIONIST INTERNATIONAL

BY MCKENZIE WARK

PUBLISHED: 22 AUGUST 2011

“The lack of politicisation in the recent riots around Britain can be frustrating to those steeped in French theory, those who see the riot as what Martin Luther King described as the “language of the unheard”. But London 2011 is quite evidently not Paris 1968. A new book about the ideas that led to that moment in Paris sheds light on quite how different the two countries’ traditions are…

Wark has done us a great favour by explaining how situationist ideas (which included a proto-internet, an information super-network free of government control) still represent the sharpest and most surprisingly prescient critiques of the contemporary city.” Edwin Heathcote, FINANCIAL TIMES
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EVENTS:

August 23, 2011, 8.00pm
Cafe OTO
18—22 Ashwin street, Dalston
London E8 3DL UK

McKenzie Wark appears at cafe OTO to talk about his book on the life and times of the Situationist International, The Beach Beneath the Street.
For more information: http://www.versobooks.com/events/191-the-beach-beneath-the-street-at-cafe-oto

August 24, 2011, 7.00pm
Housmans
5 Caledonian Road , King’s Cross
London N1 9DX

McKenzie Wark’s new book on the subject The Beach Beneath the Street: The Glorious Times of the Situationist International, explores anew the history of the movement and connects the Situationist’s work to new practices in communication, built form, and everyday life.
For more information: http://www.versobooks.com/events/196-the-glorious-times-of-the-situationist-international

August 25, 2011, 7.00pm
Whitechapel Gallery
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London E1 7QX UK

Writer McKenzie Wark explores the diversity of the Situationist International in his new book The Beach Beneath the Street, re-reading their history in the light of our contemporary experience of communications, architecture, and everyday life.
For more information: http://www.versobooks.com/events/188-the-beach-beneath-the-street-new-new-babylon
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McKenzie Wark’s history of the Situationist International writes against twenty-first century boredom with art and politics, in which both have ‘ceased to be modern, and finding it too passé to be postmodern… is now merely contemporary.’ Creating a new kind of historiography from the group’s legendary oeuvre, Wark re-presents the SI’s history in light of contemporary experiences to shake us out of our boredom and re-kindle the explosive potential of everyday life.

Over 50 years after the Situationist International appeared, its legacy of Marxism mixed with 20th century European artistic avant-garde continues to influence activists, artists and theorists. From the Invisible Committee’s bestselling The Coming Insurrection to Iain Sinclair’s psychogeographic explorations, the work of the Situationists echoes through twenty-first century thought. Yet, despite the rich possibilities, its breadth, diversity, and potential impact are still largely unexplored. Wark’s volume is a radical re-imagining of the Situationist legacy, which reconnects their work to new practices in communication, architecture, and everyday life.

Arguing that ‘Situations are temporary, singular unities of space and time… They call for a different kind of remembering,’ Wark takes readers on a tour of the movement from bohemian after-hours drinks in the cellars of 1950s St. Germain-des-Prés to the mythical beach ‘sous les pavès’ of the explosive days of May ’68.

Blending history and narrative, biography and literature, Wark traces the group’s development as an ensemble creation, rather than the brainchild of its most famous member, Guy Debord. Roaming through Europe and the lives of those who made up the movement – including Constant, Asger Jorn, Michèle Bernstein, Alex Trocchi and Jacqueline De Jong – Wark uncovers an international movement riven with conflicting passions, expanding the gaze beyond the Paris coterie.

Taking up Guy Debord’s famous injunction, “when the legend becomes fact, print the legend,” Wark delves into the SI’s diverse body of work to re-present the legendary Situationists in a way that ignites the possibility of resistance for our time. Wark puts the Situationist experiments into context for twenty-first century struggles, and in doing so, suggests that while the Situationists failed to escape the world of twentieth-century spectacle, there might still be hope for us to escape the twenty-first century, while we still can.

The book jacket is also a fold out poster, Totality for Beginners. A collaborative graphic essay, the beautifully rendered poster employs text selected by McKenzie Wark with composition and drawings by Kevin C. Pyle
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PRAISE FOR THE HACKER MANIFESTO

“This is a perceptive, provocative study, packed to the seams with acute analysis.” Terry Eagleton, NATION

“Wark’s book challenges the new regime of property relations with all the epigrammatic vitality, conceptual innovation, and revolutionary enthusiasm of the great manifestos.” Michael Hardt, co-author of EMPIRE

“Infuriating and inspiring in turn, A Hacker Manifesto will spawn a thousand theses, and just maybe spawn change.” Mike Holderness, NEW SCIENTIST

“A Hacker Manifesto will yield some provocative ideas and real challenges to a world in which everything is commodified.” Eric J. Iannelli, TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
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MCKENZIE WARK is the author of A HACKER MANIFESTO, GAMER THEORY, 50 YEARS OF RECUPERATION OF THE SITUATIONIST INTERNATIONAL and various other books. He teaches at the New School for Social Research and Eugene Lang College in New York City.
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ISBN: 978 1 84467 720 7 / $26.95 / £14.99 / $33.50CAN / Hardback / 224 pages
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For a look into MCKENZIE WARK work visit:
http://vectorsjournal.org/issues/7/totality/

For more information about THE BEACH BENEATH THE STREET or to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/980-the-beach-beneath-the-street
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Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers:http://www.versobooks.com

Become a fan of Verso on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Verso-Books/205847279448577

And get updates on Twitter –  @VersoBooks
http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Hubert Harrison

HUBERT HARRISON EVENT IN LONDON

Karia Press
Presents An “In Tribute” Event
Featuring A Presentation
By Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry
Based on his Biography
Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918

During Discussion he will be able to refer to:
Theodore W. Allen’s works:
The Invention of the White Race …

@ Centerprise
136-138 Kingsland Road
Dalston, London, E8 2NS
Friday, 20th May, 2011
7:30 – 10:00PM
Donations: £3.00

Restaurant on site

Bookings, and other information from: Karia Press: kariapress@yahoo.co.uk, Tel. 0750 4661 785

Books will be available for sale at the event.

If you wish to order a copy(ies) of the book(s) in advance, please email or call for availability and prices.

To get to the venue:
London Overground: Dalston Kingsland or Dalston Junction.
Buses: 149, 76, 243, 67, 236.

Background Information on Hubert Harrison

Hubert Harrison, (1883-1927) was an immensely skilled writer, orator, educator, critic, and political activist who, more than any other political leader of his era, combined class consciousness and anti-white-supremacist race consciousness into a coherent political radicalism. Harrison profoundly influenced “New Negro” militants, including A. Philip Randolph and Marcus Garvey, and his synthesis of class and race issues is a key unifying link between the two great trends of the Black Liberation Movement: the labour and civil-rights-based work of Martin Luther King Jr. and the race and nationalist work associated with Malcolm X.

Harrison played unique, signal roles in the largest class radical movement (socialism) and the largest race radical movement (the New Negro/Garvey) movement of his era. He was the foremost Black organizer, agitator, and theoretician of the Socialist Party of New York, the founder of the “New Negro” movement, the editor of the “Negro World,” and the principal radical influence on the Garvey movement.

He also helped transform the 135th Street Public Library into an international center for research in Black culture (known today as the world-famous Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture). His biography offers profound insights on race, class, religion, immigration, war, democracy, and social change in America.

About the Author

Jeffrey B. Perry is an independent, working class scholar who was formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia Universities. He was a long-time (33 years) activist, elected union officer with Local 300, and editor for the National Postal Mail Handlers Union (Division of LIUNA, AFL-CIO, CTW).

Dr. Perry preserved and inventoried the Hubert H. Harrison Papers (now at Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library) and is the editor of A Hubert Harrison Reader (Wesleyan University Press, 2001). He is also literary executor for Theodore W. Allen, author of The Invention of the White Race [2 Vols., Verso, 1994 and 1997), and edited and introduced Allen’s Class Struggle and the Origin of Racial Slavery: The Invention of the White Race.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Student Rebellion

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd APRIL 2011

EVENTS

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (CAPLA) FALL FOCUS WORKSHOP AND AGM

November 13 -15, 2011
One King West Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The significance of our conference venue at One King West (formerly the Dominion Bank Building) has provided the inspiration to consider the recognition of prior learning (RPL) as an investment in the future. Recognizing prior learning (RPL) pays big dividends for people, communities, organizations and countries. Managing one’s own knowledge assets is vital in an ever-changing labour market. Cashing in on what people know and can do is important to employers and to the future prosperity of Canadians and newcomers.

Sponsorship: CAPLA is looking for individuals and organizations who are able to provide financial support to assist with the costs associated with this important event. Please contact us at 1-613-860-1747 or capla@agendamanagers.com to hear more.

Attention Presenters! We are looking for innovative practices, current research, new trends, international programs and service delivery models that contribute to our understanding and overall effectiveness of prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR) and qualification recognition (QR). If you would like to be a presenter, please send a 100 word description to the Conference Secretariat at CAPLA@agendamanagers.com or call 1-877-731-1333 or 1-902-422-1886 by April 30.

Conference registration fees start at $379. Additional details and program updates can be found on the CAPLA website at http://www.capla.ca or by calling the Conference Secretariat at 1-877-731-1333.

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READNEX POETRY SQUAD, PRESENTED BY BARRIO NUEVO

April 15, 2011
9 pm
Blue Moon Pub
725 Queen St. East, Toronto

Description: “Since the emergence, disappearance, and resurgence of The Last Poets, no other group of young stanza-kickers have come about and made a significant impact in the music world. Thankfully the ReadNex Poetry Squad has decided to fill this void.”

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MINING AND RESISTANCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA: CANADIAN CORPORATIONS AT WAR AGAINST RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

April 10
2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West, Room 5150
Toronto
No Registration. Everyone welcome.

Presenters: Juan Carlos Jimenez, Megan Cotton-Kinch, organizers in the Mining Injustice Solidarity Network.

Canadian mining companies are continuing to contaminate water, poison land and tear apart communities in Central America. In El Salvador, the government has ruled that metal mining would fatally pollute the rivers needed for agriculture, but the country itself is now being sued for $77 million under a free trade agreement. In Guatemala, Mayan communities are fighting back through community-controlled referendums, but face the imposition of martial law. In Honduras, the Canadian government was one of the first to legitimize a bloody military coup, which replaced a left-leaning government with one more friendly to mining interests.

Organizers from Mining Injustice Solidarity Network will present on how Canada is complicit in intimidation, assassinations, anti-environmental lawsuits and military coups and how we in Canada can join in solidarity with the struggle for justice.

Readings: http://www.miningwatch.ca/en/corporate-rights-over-human-rights-canadian-mining-central-america

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q20YxkM-CGI

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BOOK LAUNCH – MEDIA MEDIOCRITY: HOW THE TELEVISION MAKES US STOOPID!

April 16, 2011
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Another Story Bookshop
315 Roncesvalles Ave
Toronto, ON

Meteorologist, TV/film producer, university lecturer, writer, broadcaster and general media expert, Richard Zurawski is coming to the store to lead a discussion about how the media is failing to keep us informed.

Why do so many people still deny the “hypothesis” of global climate change? All but a few rogue scientists agree that we have a crisis on our hands, but all we get from TV and news media are debates in the form of sound bites… Why are we denying the voices of those experts in favor of politicians and pundits? So get up off the couch and let’s have a discussion (with an expert) face to
face!

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REBEL FILMS – MADE IN DAGENHAM

Friday, April 8
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

Made in Dagenham 2010, 113 minutes. In 1968, the Ford auto factory in Dagenham was one of the largest single private employers in the United Kingdom. In addition to the thousands of male employees, there are also 187 underpaid women machinists who primarily assemble the car seat upholstery in poor working conditions. Dissatisfied, the women fight for a better deal. However, Rita O’Grady learns that there is a larger issue in this dispute: that women are paid an appalling fraction of the men’s wages for the same work across the board on the sole basis of their sex. Refusing to tolerate this inequality any longer, O’Grady leads a strike by her fellow machinists for equal pay for equal work. What follows would test the patience of all involved in a grinding labour and political struggle that ultimately would advance the cause of women’s rights around the world. Marie Clarke Walker, Canadian Labour Congress Executive V.P., will lead off a discussion on the film.

Please visit: http://www.socialistaction-canada.blogspot.com or call 416 – 535-8779.

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – MANAGING HUMAN RESOURCES IN NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS CERTIFICATE

With Kunle Akingbola (University of Toronto / Toronto Rehab)

Human resources are not only the core asset of community organizations; such organizations cannot replace their human capital with investment in physical capital. Coupled with the pressure to be efficient and strategic, maximizing human capital is essential to achieving organizations goals. This
certificate program is designed to strengthen human resource management and leadership competencies by helping managers to acquire tools and resources to enhance leadership skills, manage organizational change and gain knowledge around effective compensation.

* Change Management – April 21
* Compensation and Benefits – May 27

9:30 am-4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto (St. George subway station)
         
Cost: $140 + HST.  A limited number of spaces are available to students at a discounted rate. Discount for those registering for more than one workshop, or for more than one person registering from the same organization.

To Register: Access the online registration form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FY65KMM or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@gmail.com, or 416-978-0022.

Kunle Akingola is a Human Resources Manager/Consultant and Adjunct Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto with extensive experience in both the non-profit and corporate sector

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NEWS & VIEWS

RACE, CLASS STRUGGLE AND ORGANIZED LABOUR IN THE “AGE OF WISCONSIN”

By Ajamu Nangwaya, Linchpin

…The racialized section of the United States’ working-class has been bearing the brunt of the racist, sexist and capitalist battering of the welfare state structures since the 1980s without much sympathy from their white working-class counterparts…But predominantly-white Wisconsin is up in arms when the chicken comes home to roost in their own backyard! Martin Luther King was quite right when he declared, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” We can only hope that white workers come to realize that white supremacist beliefs and practices only weaken the working-class – to the advantage of the small capitalist elite.

Read more: http://linchpin.ca/content/left/Race-class-struggle-organized-labour-%E2%80%9CAge-Wisconsin%E2%80%9D

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BILL 150: ATTACK ON PUBLIC SECTOR UNIONS

By Herman Rosenfeld, BASICSnews

By the end of March, the Ontario Liberal government of Dalton McGuinty will have passed Bill 150. It declares the TTC to be an essential service and denies Toronto public transit workers – members of the Amalgamated Transit Workers Union (ATU) Local 113 – the right to strike.

The attack on the transit workers was one of the first things that the newly elected right-wing populist Mayor of Toronto did this winter. Building on the memory of a short transit stoppage and the municipal workers strike from a couple of summers ago, Ford saw this as part of his plans to demonize public sector workers as a way of isolating all unions and weakening the collective gains of working people.

Read more: http://basicsnews.ca/?p=2918

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INVITATION TO JOIN LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCHERS OF ONTARIO (LARO)

The Latin American Researchers of Ontario (LARO), a recently formed non-profit association, is extending a warm invitation to individuals and organizations to join its membership and collective work.

The organization aims to promote research on Latin America and Latin Americans in Ontario. It hopes to provide an inclusive and interdisciplinary space for individuals who share an interest in the production and dissemination of written, oral, visual, and other knowledge and who define themselves and/or their work as Latin American.

In an effort to challenge elitist tendencies, the organization seeks give priority and visibility to grassroots research and to question prevalent forms of inequality.

Members will have the opportunity to share their work, knowledge, experiences and ideas with other members and constructively learn from each other. As a new organization, LARO is open to the incorporation of new ideas, visions, and projects.

For more information, we invite you to visit our website: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/

If you wish to become a LARO member and/or receive information from us, please click the link below to our contact page and send us your contact information, including your research interest, and let us know if you would like your name to appear in the public members’ list: http://www.latinamericanresearchers.com/contact.html.

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A PRIMER ON CLASS STRUGGLE

By Michael Schwalbe, Common Dreams

When we study Marx in my graduate social theory course, it never fails that at least one student will say (approximately), “Class struggle didn’t escalate in the way Marx expected. In modern capitalist societies class struggle has disappeared. So isn’t it clear that Marx was wrong and his ideas are of little value today?”

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/03/31-4

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MAKING IT COUNT – CCPA’S (CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES) FEDERAL ELECTION BLOG

The CCPA has launched a federal election blog to bring you expert analysis on the issues that will—or should—define the election.

Making It Count features timely commentary from CCPA staff and research associates, who will be weighing in everything from the economy and federal finances to the social and environmental challenges facing our country.

Read more: http://federalelectionblog.ca/

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(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

CLR James

SAVE THE CLR JAMES LIBRARY

The CLR James Library, in Hackney, east London, is being ‘renamed’. History is being re-written, and a proud tradition and a significant historical figure are being downgraded and hope for the future marginalized on the alter of managerialism.

Sign the petition here: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/

At the Rendezvous of Victory

September 22, 2010

By Scott McLemee

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee307

One of the turning points in my life came in 1988, upon discovery of the writings of C.L.R. James. The word “discovery” applies for a couple of reasons. Much of his work was difficult to find, for one thing. But more than that, it felt like exploring a new continent.

James was born in Trinidad in 1901, and he died in England in 1989. (I had barely worked up the nerve to consider writing him a letter.) He had started out as a man of letters, publishing short stories and a novel about life among the poorest West Indians. He went on to write what still stands as the definitive history of the Haitian slave revolt, The Black Jacobins (1938). His play based on research for that book starred Paul Robeson as Toussaint Louverture. In 1939, he went to Mexico to discuss politics with Leon Trotsky. A few years later — and in part because of certain disagreements he’d had with Trotsky — James and his associates in the United States brought out the first English translation of Karl Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. (By the early 1960s, there would be a sort of cottage industry in commentary on these texts, but James planted his flag in 1947.)

He was close friends with Richard Wright and spoke at Martin Luther King, Jr.’s church. At one point, the United States government imprisoned James on Ellis Island as a dangerous subversive. While so detained, he drafted a book about Herman Melville as prophet of 20th century totalitarianism — with the clear implication that the U.S. was not immune to it.

Settled in Britain, he wrote a book on the history and meaning of cricket called Beyond a Boundary (1963). By all accounts it is one of the classics of sports writing. Being both strenuously unathletic and an American, I was prepared to take this on faith. But having read some of it out of curiosity, I found the book fascinating, even if the game itself remained incomprehensible.

This is, of course, an extremely abbreviated survey of his life and work. The man was a multitude. A few years ago, I tried to present a more comprehensive sketch in this short magazine article, and edited a selection of his hard-to-find writings for the University Press of Mississippi.

In the meantime, it has been good to see his name becoming much more widely known than it was at the time of his death more than two decades ago. This is particularly true among young people. They take much for granted that a literary or political figure can be, as James was, transnational in the strongest sense — thinking and writing and acting “beyond the boundary” of any given national context. He lived and worked in the 20th century, of course, but James is among the authors the 21st century will make its own.

So it is appalling to learn that the C.L.R. James Library in Hackney (a borough of London) is going to be renamed the Dalston Library and Archives, after the neighborhood in which it is located. James was there when the library was christened in his honor in 1985. The authorities insist that, in spite of the proposed change, they will continue to honor James. But this seems half-hearted and unsatisfying.

There is a petition against the name change, which I hope readers of this column will sign and help to circulate.

Some have denounced the name change as an insult, not just to James’s memory, but to the community in which the library is located, since Hackney has a large black population. I don’t know enough to judge whether any offense was intended. But the renaming has a significance going well beyond local politics in North London.

C.L.R. James was a revolutionary; that he ended up imprisoned for a while seems, all in all, par for the course. But he was also very much the product of the cultural tradition he liked to call Western Civilization. He used this expression without evident sarcasm — a remarkable thing, given that he was a tireless anti-imperialist. Given his studies in the history of Africa and the Caribbean, he might well have responded as Gandhi did when asked what he thought of Western Civilization: “I think it would be a good idea.”

As a child, James reread Thackeray’s satirical novel Vanity Fair until he had it almost memorized; this was, perhaps, his introduction to social criticism. He traced his ideas about politics back to ancient Greece. James treated thefuneral oration of Pericles as a key to understanding Lenin’s State and Revolution. And there is a film clip that shows him speaking to an audience of British students on Shakespeare — saying that he wrote “some of the finest plays I know about the impossibility of being a king.” As with James’s interpretation of Captain Ahab as a prototype of Stalin, this is a case of criticism as transformative reading. It’s eccentric, but it sticks with you.

Harold Bloom might not approve of what James did with the canon. And Allan Bloom would have been horrified, no doubt about it. But it helps explain some of James’s discomfort about the emergence of African-American studies as an academic discipline. He taught the subject for some time as a professor at Federal City College, now called the University of the District of Columbia — but not without misgivings.

“For myself,” he said in a lecture in 1969, “I do not believe that there is any such thing as black studies. There are studies in which black people and black history, so long neglected, can now get some of the attention they deserve. … I do not know, as a Marxist, black studies as such. I only know the struggle of people against tyranny and oppression in a certain political setting, and, particularly, during the past two hundred years. It’s impossible for me to separate black studies from white studies in any theoretical point of view.”

James’s argument here is perhaps too subtle for the Internet to propagate. (I type his words with mild dread at the likely consequences.) But the implications are important — and they apply with particular force to the circumstance at hand, the move to rename the C.L.R. James Library in London.

People of Afro-Caribbean descent in England have every right to want James to be honored. But no less outspoken, were he still alive, would be Martin Glaberman — a white factory worker in Detroit who later became a professor of social science at Wayne State University. (I think of him now because it was Marty who was keeping many of James’s books in print when I first became interested in them.) James was the nexus between activists and intellectuals in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, and his cosmopolitanism included a tireless effort to connect cultural tradition to modern politics. To quote from the translation he made of a poem by Aimé Cesaire: “No race holds the monopoly of beauty, of intelligence, of strength, and there is a place for all at the rendezvous of victory.”

Having C.L.R. James’s name on the library is an honor — to the library. To remove it is an act of vandalism. Please sign the http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 4th SEPTEMBER 2010

 

EVENTS

VOICES OF DISSENT: INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF POETRY OF RESISTANCE

Sept. 16-20
Toronto

Poets, artists, musicians and social activists will gather in various Toronto venues later this month to celebrate the boundless capacity of verse to resist oppression and create links among diverse communities. The International Festival of Poetry of Resistance will feature readings, roundtable discussions, musical performances and a special “festivalito” for children.

The festival will begin on Thursday, September 16 at 5 p.m. at the New Horizons Auditorium, 1140 Bloor Street West (at Dufferin), Toronto. It will continue until Monday, September 20 at various locations. The children’s “Festivalito” will take place on Friday, September 17 from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the 519 Church Street Community Centre.

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE SPEAKERS’ SERIES: SOCIAL STOCK MARKETS & IMPACT INVESTING

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 12-199
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:
Adam Spence, Social Innovation Generation (SiG) @ MaRS
Annie Malhotra, Social Venture Exchange (SVX)

Adam Spence will discuss the practical development of impact investing in Canada, an investment approach aiming to solve social or environmental challenges while generating financial profit.

Annie Malhotra will discuss the development of the social venture exchange (SVX) project and the work of ethical stock markets around the globe.

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact: Lisa White at secspeakerseries@gmail.com.

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

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FREE TRANSIT STREET PARTY

Saturday, Oct. 2
1:00-4:00
In Christie Pits Park off Bloor St
(across the street from the Christie subway stop)

No Fare Is Fair!

Come to the park to celebrate the campaign to win free and accessible transit for the GTA.

Food, music, puppets, entertainment and more.

For more info or to get involved contact: nofareisfair@gmail.com

A project of the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca

Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=147217141977827

Poster for October 2nd event (please copy and distribute):
http://www.workersassembly.ca/events/FreeTransit.pdf

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WORKING WITH GRASSROOTS COMMUNITY GROUPS: LUNCH N’ LEARN

September 13, 2010
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Centre for Social Innovation, 4th Floor, Alterna Savings Room
215 Spadina Ave., Toronto

Mario Tellez, Projects Coordinator of the Casa Canadiense Community Centre in Managua, Nicaragua will facilitate a discussion about the challenges and possibilities of working with community groups.  As the Projects Coordinator, Mario works closely with 10 grassroots community associations in Nicaragua to develop proposals, implement projects and effectively relay the stories of communities back to donors.  He is developing a capacity building program where representatives of community groups will work to improve their proposal writing skills.

If you want to discuss your experiences working with the grassroots and share ideas about what works, what doesn’t and how we can engage respectfully with partners, please attend!

To register: katie@pueblito.org

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CLIMATE REALITY: A CONVERSATION WITH DR. JAMES HANSEN, NAOMI KLEIN & CLAYTON THOMAS-MULLER

Wednesday, September 15
5:30-9:30
McMillan Theatre, University of Toronto
Edward Johnson Bldg (North), 80 Queen’s Park, Toronto

A public event on climate science and climate justice with the world’s foremost climate scientist and author of Storms of My Grandchildren, Dr. James Hansen; the author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Naomi Klein and Indigenous Environmental Network’s Tar Sands Campaigner, Clayton Thomas-Muller. Moderator: Dr. Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux (U of T, Aboriginal Studies and Social Work).

5:30pm – 6:30pm Science presentation by James Hansen
6:30pm – 7:00pm Intermission
7:00pm – 8:45pm Climate Reality: A Conversation with Dr. James Hansen, Naomi Klein & Clayton Thomas-Muller, moderated by Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux.

Admission free.

Organized by:
The Centre for Global Change Science, U of T, http://www.cgcs.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspx

Science for Peace, http://www.scienceforpeace.ca

Contact: Science for Peace office, sfp@physics.utoronto.ca

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SUBURBAN UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY RESEARCH NETWORK MEETING

September 17
10am – noon
East Scarborough Storefront
4040 Lawrence Ave East, Toronto

On the agenda so far:
– follow up on the Mimico 20/20 plan and response
– other housing / anti-poverty initiatives?
– transit activism in East Scarborough and city wide
– municipal elections

Please feel free to make additions!

The August 16th meeting took place in South Etobicoke, hosted by LAMP and local area residents. We went on a walking tour of the community, guided by local residents, and learned about city hall’s vision for the area’s redevelopment and the implications for tenants. Some members of our network have undertaken research about the planning process in support of the residents and will provide an update in September.

For more information, contact Deb Cowen at: deb.cowen@utoronto.ca

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UNION ACTION WITHOUT BORDERS: AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

Thursday, 23 September 2010
HEC Montreal
Cote-Sainte-Catherine Bldg.
3000 Cote-Sainte Catherine Avenue
Montreal, PQ

The Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT) in collaboration with CISO, CSQ, CSN and FTQ is organizing a symposium on international trade union action. Its purpose is to assess the different initiatives undertaken by labour unions at various levels, be it local, national and international.

This important Symposium will tackle a variety of contemporary relevant issues. What tools and resources are available to unions? How can we build a dialogue between northern and southern countries? How can we enhance workers’ awareness with respect to international trade unionism? How can these actions improve the working conditions here in Canada and abroad? These are some of the questions to be discussed among participants during plenary sessions and workshops.

For more info: http://www.crimt.org/uawb.html

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NEWS & VIEWS

PRIVATE SECTOR IS NOT HELPING ECONOMIC RECOVERY

Tepid GDP numbers released Tuesday by Statistics Canada confirm that Canada’s economic recovery, such as it was, is sliding completely into the ditch. We’re clearly heading for stagnation at best, and quite possibly another “double dip” downturn.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/09/private-sectors-continuing-failure-lead-economic-recovery  

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NON-UNION HOSPITAL STAFF FORCED TO TAKE TWO YEARS OF ZEROES. AN INCENTIVE FOR UNIONIZATION?

by Doug Allan, leftwords

The Toronto Star reports: “Thousands of Ontario nurses who work at …non-unionized hospitals complain they’re getting the cold shoulder from Premier Dalton McGuinty’s public sector pay freeze.”

While the non-union RNs are in the midst of a government imposed two year wage freeze, unionized RNs got pay increases April 1, as per their collective agreement. “I don’t know why they’re doing this to us,” non-union RN Julia Fisher said. “The government has created a two-tier pay schedule. We’re being penalized.”

Read more: http://www.ochu.on.ca/leftwords_ochuBlog.php

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ON MLK’S DAY, UNIONS, CONSERVATIVES RALLY FOR JOBS, JUSTICE—HONOR?

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

Forty-seven years after Martin Luther King, Jr. uttered the words “I have a dream” to an overflow crowd on the Washington Mall, August 28 still has resonance for civil rights activists, the union movement, and, now, the Tea Party?

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/blogs/2010/09/mlks-day-unions-conservatives-rally-jobs-justice-honor

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POLICE MADE MISTAKES IN G20 TACTICS, CHIEF ADMITS FOR FIRST TIME

By Kate Allen, Globe & Mail

Acknowledgment comes on heels of raft of complaints, lawsuits, inquiries into police actions during June weekend.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/police-made-mistakes-in-g20-tactics-chief-admits-for-first-time/article1694815/

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NEW BOOK ON THE GLOBAL WORKING CLASS: “LIVE WORKING OR DIE FIGHTING”

Paul Mason’s “Live Working or Die Fighting” is one of the most important books to come out about the international labour movement in recent years.  It’s just come out in paperback and it’s LabourStart’s book of the month for September.

Live Working or Die Fighting is a two-hundred year story of the global working class and its many struggles for justice. The stories in the book come to life through the voices of remarkable individuals: child laborers in Charles Dickens’ England, visionary women on the barricades of Paris, gun-toting railway strikers in America’s Wild West, and beer-swilling German metalworkes who tried to stop the First World War. It is a story of urban slums, self-help cooperatives, choirs and brass bands, free love, and self-education by candlelight. And in the developing industrial economies of the world, it is still with us.

To learn more about it and to order your copies, visit https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=workclass&affl=labourstart  

Remember that every copy you order helps support LabourStart’s campaigning activities; for more info about LabourStart, visit http://www.labourstart.org/

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REPORT: WORKING AS ALLIES

by Jen Margaret, Auckland Workers Educational Association

A critical dimension of social justice struggles is the work of the people who support those more directly affected by a particular justice issue, the work of allies. This report documents learning from a visit, made possible with support from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, to North America in May 2010 to meet with people who are working as allies supporting the struggles of indigenous peoples and/or undertaking anti-racism work. In 15 separate meetings I met with 18 people who were working in a range of contexts that included Indigenous studies programmes in universities, community organisations, church and human rights organisations. I also had email discussions with a number of people with whom it was not possible to meet face to face.

Read the full report: http://awea.org.nz/sites/default/files/Jen_Margaret_Working_as_Allies_2010.pdf
Resources for working as allies: http://awea.org.nz/allies_resources

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

MIND THE GAP: SCHOOL LEAVER ASPIRATIONS AND DELAYED PATHWAYS TO FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Author: Tom Stehlika
Journal of Education and Work, Volume 23, Issue 4 September
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a926503481~frm=titlelink
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HEALTH LEARNING AND ADULT EDUCATION: IN SEARCH OF A THEORY OF PRACTICE
Sandra R. Schecter and Jacqueline Lynch
Adult Education Quarterly published 27 August 2010, 10.1177/0741713610380438
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713610380438v

IS ANY JOB BETTER THAN NO JOB? LIFE SATISFACTION AND RE-EMPLOYMENT
Carola Grün, Wolfgang Hauser and Thomas Rhein
Journal of Labor Research,Volume 31, Number 3, 285-306
http://www.springerlink.com/content/7x18u6642w15g634/

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JOB POSTINGS

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION, TORONTO – INTERNSHIP

Wanna be an agent for change? Are you ready to change the world? Crazy creative? Love helping people? Juiced by turning wild ideas into action? And have a little extra time to invest in your future?

The Centre for Social Innovation is offering a world-changing opportunity to trade your time and energy for our expertise, networks and free office space! Warning: We have no money! This isn’t a paying gig.

The deal: your time & positive energy = free office space, ideas and networks

The Centre for Social Innovation is looking for up to fifteen incredible people to participate in a four month agents of change pilot program.

You get trained up in a community animation intensive.  Then you give your time as a community animator for free office space — 1 day per week of your time = 60 hours/month of hot desking. The program runs from October 1, 2010 to January 30, 2011.

More info: http://socialinnovation.ca/internship

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CANVASSERS, F/T, TORONTO ENVIRONMENTAL ALLIANCE, TORONTO ON

TEA is recognized locally and nationally for our municipal work on smog, waste reduction, pesticides, transit, Greenbelt protection, energy efficiency and green power — issues we believe are critical to the health and well-being of Toronto residents. Our collaborations with the community (eg. community groups, local labour groups, small businesses, anti-poverty groups) are cherished and key to our past and future successes.

The Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) has exciting opportunities for
environmentally minded, articulate, and passionate individuals.

TEA is currently hiring front line campaign positions. The job gives you the opportunity to go door to door and talk to the public about some of Toronto’s key environmental issues. Give yourself the chance to really make a difference in our community.

The job hours are from 2pm – 10pm, Monday through Friday. Starting pay is $410 a week for full-time.

More info: http://torontoenvironment.org/jobs

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FOODSHARE COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, TORONTO

Deadline: Friday, September 17, 2010, 5pm

FoodShare Toronto is seeking a Communications Coordinator to join our dynamic and passionate team.

Reporting to the Fundraising and Communications Manager, this position will support all of FoodShare’s communications activities and the creation of all of our communications materials for our diverse stakeholders including customers, program participants, community members, partners, donors, policy makers, educators, the general public and more. More specifically, the Communications Coordinator will take responsibility for assuring that brand standards and guidelines are maintained, that the FoodShare website and social media channels are fresh and up-to-date, and will assist with media relations and event coordination.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/upcomingjobs-CommCoord.htm
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Revolutionizing Pedagogy

THE ROUGE FORUM – CONFERENCE 2010

A message from Rich Gibson

Dear Friends

The Rouge Forum update is here: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

Remember Proposals are Due, April 15, for the Rouge Forum Conference: http://rougeforumconference.org/

Send Your Articles, Photos, Cartoons, for the RF News to Community Coordinator Adam Renner arenner@bellarmine.edu  

On April 4th, 43 Years Ago, Martin Luther King gave his speech opposing the war in Vietnam. Here is a link to the speech:

“A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor ­ both black and white ­ through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerated as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such.

Perhaps the more tragic recognition of reality took place when it became clear to me that the war was doing far more than devastating the hopes of the poor at home. It was sending their sons and their brothers and their husbands to fight and to die in extraordinarily high proportions relative to the rest of the population.”

Be there or Be Square! April 24, Fresno. Next meeting of the M4 Movement.

More inside!

Good luck to us, every one.

Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com