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Michel Foucault

RADICAL FOUCAULT – AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Radical Foucault – An International Conference

September 8 & 9, 2011, 9.30am – 6.30pm
University of East London

The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is pleased to announce that registration is now open for Radical Foucault, a two day conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Keynote speakers:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.
David Macey, Special Professor in Translation, University of Nottingham
Anne Schwan, Lecturer in English Literature, Edinburgh Napier University
Stephen Shapiro, Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies, Warwick University.
Couze Venn, Emeritus Professor of Cultural Theory at the Theory, Culture & Society Centre, Nottingham Trent University and Managing Editor and Review Editor of Theory, Culture & Society.

Two Days: £120
One Day: £70

To register, please go to http://uel.ac.uk/foucault

Please note that registration includes lunches and other refreshments during the conference, but not accommodation or evening meals.

We will plan a dinner for the Thursday evening nearer the time and will contact all delegates to invite them to take part, but payment for this will be organised separately.

The conference will take place in the East Building, University of East London, Docklands Campus, London, E16 2RD.

If you need information about accommodation near the campus, then the easiest place to find it is at
http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visitors/hotels (the Excel conference centre is very near to the campus), but we would also recommend searching online for accommodation in more central parts of town if that is your preference (the journey from central London to the campus normally takes 40-60
minutes).

Full programme details will be published shortly: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org

 

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Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Midnight

RADICAL FOUCAULT

CALL FOR PAPERS

Radical Foucault: A One Day Conference

Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a one-day conference on Friday, September 9th, 2011 which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?
How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Tuesday, 1st March 2011. Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Athens, The Academy

NEW DATE FOR ‘THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY’ – MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

NEW DATE for ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, Philosophy Department, Middlesex University

The Middlesex workshop on the Humanities will now take place on TUESDAY 7 DECEMBER 2010, 11am-6pm, Saloon (M004), Ground Floor, Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ.

Schedule:

11am
Christian Kerslake
Introduction: Philosophy, the Humanities and the University

11.30
Andrew McGettigan
How will Willett’s ‘New Providers’ affect the Arts and Humanities? Independents, For-Profits and External Degrees in the Proposals for Higher Education

12.00
Dave Hill
Education and Resistance in/under Capitalism

12.30
Discussion

1.00
Break for Lunch

2.00
Johann Hoiby, Alfie Meadows, Maria-Louise Rosbech
Student Reflections

2.45
Andrew Goffey
Stupidity and the University

3.15
Matthew Charles
Philanthropy and the Image of the University

3.45
Discussion & Coffee

4.30
Mark Kelly
Resisting the Bureaucratisation of the University

5.00 
Marina Vishmidt
The Humanities and the Location of Value in the University

5.30
Discussion

* * * 
THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY

What are the Humanities, and what are they for? What is a university, and what is it for? Is it possible to stipulate that Humanities education is an essential component of what a university does, or should be doing? How can the links be reinforced between Humanities education and principles of universality and equality?

In her recent book Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton, 2010), Martha Nussbaum argues that “thirsty for national profit, nations, and their systems of education, are heedlessly discarding skills that are needed to keep democracies alive. If this trend continues, nations all over the world will soon be producing generations of useful machines, rather than complete citizens who can think for themselves”. She presents a case that Humanities education is essential to the cultivation of critical thinking, reflection and empathy with others. 

How, then, to effectively defend Humanities education? At this current juncture, is it possible to effectively defend the Humanities and higher education without also calling for an overall reform of the economy? 

In the past five years Middlesex University has abandoned teaching and research in two key Humanities subjects, History (closed in 2006) and Philosophy (admissions stopped in 2010). It appears to be on course to reduce all of its Humanities provision. This workshop will be a forum for lecturers and students to discuss the future of the Humanities at Middlesex and in the UK in general.

The workshop is co-organised by Andrew Goffey (a.goffey@mdx.ac.uk) and Christian Kerslake (c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk).

Attendance is free, but please register at mdxhumanities@yahoo.co.uk.

Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

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Nietzsche

CLOSURE OF PHILOSOPHY AT MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY – A MESSAGE FROM PETER HALLWARD

Dear friends and colleagues

I regret to say that Middlesex University has just decided, rather abruptly, to close all its Philosophy programmes and to shut down our Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP; http://www.web.mdx.ac.uk/crmep/)  

Staff include Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Mark Kelly, Christian Kerslake, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford.  Some members of the Centre may be laid off more or less immediately, and some will remain temporarily, to teach out the programmes.

As you might expect we’re scrambling to put together a response, and to begin with we’re asking colleagues and friends to send a brief email or letter about the closure to the University administrators who have made this unexpected decision. If you have time to write such a message, please feel free to extract some points from a draft letter that a few of our most recent collaborators will be sending later today to Times Higher Education, below.

The main people involved in the decision are as follows:

Vice-Chancellor of the University, Michael Driscoll, m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:M.Driscoll@mdx.ac.uk>

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise, Waqar Ahmad, w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk mailto:w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk

Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic, Margaret House, m.house@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:m.house@mdx.ac.uk>

Dean of the School of Arts & Education, Ed Esche, e.esche@mdx.ac.uk mailto:e.esche@mdx.ac.uk

(The full set of emails is then: m.driscoll@mdx.ac.uk; w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:w.ahmad@mdx.ac.uk>; m.house@mdx.ac.uk; e.esche@mdx.ac.uk <mailto:e.esche@mdx.ac.uk>).

If you are able to send this sort of message, and are willing for your message to be posted subsequently on a campaign website or blog, please copy or blind-copy (BCC) it to our campaign email, savemdxphil@gmail.com   <mailto:savemdxphil@gmail.com> .

By tomorrow I expect we’ll have set up a petition to save the CRMEP, and will get back to you about this soon.

Although it may already be too late to save Philosophy at Middlesex, some decisive action now may help protect other vulnerable subjects at the University, and in the UK more generally. It’s been very encouraging, over the course of today, to receive dozens of messages of support and solidarity.

I’ll circulate more information about the campaign to save the CRMEP once we’ve had time to set up a basic website or blog.

All best,
Peter

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European Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY CLOSURE AT MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Late on Monday 26 April, staff in Philosophy at Middlesex University in London were informed that the University executive are to close all Philosophy programmes: undergraduate, postgraduate and MPhil/PhD.

Philosophy is the highest research-rated subject at Middlesex University, with 65% of its research activity judged ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ in the UK government’s recent Research Assessment Exercise. It is now widely recognised as one of the most important centres for the study of modern European philosophy anywhere in the English-speaking world. Its MA programmes in Philosophy have grown in recent years to become the largest in the UK, with 42 new students admitted in September 2009.

Middlesex offers one of only a handful of programmes left in the UK that provides both research-driven and inclusive post-graduate teaching aimed at a wide range of students, specialist and non-specialist. It is also one of relatively few such programmes that remains financially viable, currently contributing close to half of its total income to the University’s central administration.

Needless to say, Radical Philosophy very much regret this decision to terminate Philosophy at Middlesex, and its likely consequences for the teaching of philosophy in the UK.

This is a shameful decision which essentially means the end of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, a hub for internationally renowned scholarship (http://www.web. mdx.ac.uk/ crmep/; staff include Eric Alliez, Peter Hallward, Mark Kelly, Christian Kerslake, Peter Osborne and Stella Sandford). This act of wilful self-harm by the University must be resisted.

Please join the facebook group and spread the word: http://www.facebook .com/group. php?gid=11910256 1449990

Campaign email: savemdxphil@ gmail.com

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