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Tag Archives: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat

Raya Dunayevskaya

THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST

ANNOUNCING OUR NEW WEB PUBLICATION

THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST (September 2012)
See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

***NEW BOOKS OF INTEREST:

MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM – by Peter Hudis
Historical Materialism Series, Brill Academic Publishers 2012, paperback in 2013

MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY – by Heather Brown

Historical Materialism Series, Brill Academic Publishers 2012, paperback in 2013

***FEATURED ARTICLES:

TAKING BACK OUR LABOR: WISCONSIN AND THE CRISIS OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM – by Dale Parsons

YEAR TWO OF THE ARAB REVOLUTIONS – by Kevin Anderson

FROM THE ECONOMIC CRISIS TO THE TRANSCENDENCE OF CAPITAL – by Peter Hudis

THE MARIKANA MINE WORKER’S MASSACRE ? A MASSIVE ESCALATION IN THE WAR ON THE POOR – by Ayanda Kota

TRANSCENDENCE OF THE OPPOSITION BETWEEN THE REAL AND THE IDEAL – by Marilyn Nissim-Sabat

CRITIQUE OF THE SITUATIONIST DIALECTIC IN THE AGE OF OCCUPY – by David Black

***LATEST ARTICLES:

THE LEFT AND THE JIHAD: LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP? – by Bill Weinberg

THE CONNECTION OF MIND AND NATURE: MARX’S 1878 NOTEBOOKS ON GEOLOGY – by Martin Hundt

FROM HABAKKUK TO LOCKE: THE NON-PECULIARITY OF THE ENGLISH GLORIOUS REVOLUTION OF 1688 – by David Black

MARX EN TORNO AL NACTIONALISMO, LA ETNICIDAD U LAS SOCIEDADES NO ‘OCCIDENTALES’ – by Kevin Anderson

The International Marxist-Humanist Organization (IMHO) aims to develop and project a viable vision of a truly new, human society that can give direction to today?s many liberation struggles, whether of labor, women, youth, or racial/ethnic and sexual minorities. It seeks to work out a unity of theory and practice, worker and intellectual, and philosophy and organization. We ground our ideas in the totality of Marx’s Marxism and Raya Dunayevskaya’s body of ideas and upon the unique philosophic contributions that have guided Marxist-Humanism since its founding in the 1950s.

Contact: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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1839

ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM: THEORETICAL, PRACTICAL, VISIONARY

From the U.S. Marxist Humanists 

Alternatives to Capitalism: Theoretical, Practical, Visionary

Join us for a discussion on the ongoing work of developing a philosophically grounded alternative to capitalism. It is clear that existing society has little to offer except years and even decades of austerity, reduced living standards, increasing social anxiety, and the continued enrichment of an oligarchic elite. The time has come to create new visions of an alternative that is inherent in the present and in the legacy of Karl Marx. 

Friday, July 13th 6:30pm

Corboy Law Center, Loyola University Chicago

25 East Pearson, Room 211

(1 block E of State, 1 block N of Chicago)

Chair:

Lauren Langman, Sociology, Loyola University

Speakers:

“Resistance versus Emancipation: from Foucault to Marx”

 — Kevin Anderson (USA), author of ‘Marx at the Margins:  On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies’

“The Ongoing Relevance of Marxist-Humanism”

— Sandra Rein (Canada), author of ‘Reading Dunayevskaya: Engaging the Emergence of Marxist-Humanism’

Transcending the Opposition Between the Real and the Ideal

— Marilyn Nissim-Sabat (USA), author of ‘Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity’

“A Critique of the Situationist Dialectic in the Age of Occupy”

— David Black (Britain), author of ‘1839? The Chartist Insurrection’

“From the Economic Crisis to the Transcendence of Capital”

— Peter Hudis (USA), author of ‘Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism’

Sponsored by Loyola University, Department of Sociology

Co-Sponsored by U.S. Marxist-Humanists, http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org, an affiliate of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

Email: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org

Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/alternatives-to-capitalism-theoretical-practical-visionary-13-july-chicago

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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Karl Marx

MARX’S ‘CAPITAL’ FOR TODAY

Announcing a new series on
Marx’s Capital for Today:  A Reading of Volume One of Capital

Second & Fourth Mondays
June, July & August
6:30-9.00 pm
@ Chicago Public Library
Harold Washington Library Center
400 South State St. Chicago IL
Room 3N-6

Join us for a re-examination of Marx’s analysis of the logic of capital in light of today’s economic and social crises. The focus will be Volume One of Marx’s Capital, in which Marx developed some of his most creative philosophic conceptions. The suggested readings from Marx will be supplemented by selections from Marxism and Freedom, by Raya Dunayevskaya, founder of Marxist-Humanism in the U.S.

Capital is online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1

Marxism and Freedom is available from U.S. Marxist-Humanists.

Sponsored by the U.S. Marxist-Humanists
Email: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org
Phone: 773-561-3454
eg/2011/labor donated
*********

Schedule and Readings

June 13th   — The Commodity Form and the Dual Character of Labor

Marx called his analysis of the dual character of labor at the start of Capital his “unique contribution” to the critique of political economy. This meeting will discuss the difference between concrete labor and abstract labor and how it defines the nature of the social relations of modern capitalism.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapter 1, sections 1 and 2 (pp. 125-137)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 5 (pp. 81-91)

Leading the discussion: Peter Hudis, General Editor, The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg

*********

June 27th — The Forms of Value and the Function of Money

The discussion of the forms of value in section 3 of chapter 1 of Capital, which is the subject of this meeting, is of pivotal importance in disclosing capitalism’s drive to commodify human relations as well as the function of money in the modern world.

Suggesting reading:
Capital, chapter 1, section 3 (pp. 138-163).
Leading the discussion: Anton Evelynov, student activist

*********

July 11th — The Adventures of Commodity Fetishism

The section on “The Fetishism of the Commodity and its Secret” has been widely considered the philosophic core of Capital, in which Marx both pinpoints the reason for capitalism’s persistence and points to its possible transcendence. This meeting will focus on this famous section in light of ongoing debates in radical theory.

Suggesting readings:
Capital, chapter 1, section 4 (pp. 163-177)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 6 (pp. 92-102).

Leading the discussion: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, author, Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity

*********

July 25th — What is Capital? Why is it the Defining Feature of Modern Society?

Part 2 of Capital, “The Transformation of Money into Capital,” which is the subject of this meeting, discloses the peculiar nature of capital as a social form and how it becomes the universal medium of  social relations in capitalist society.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapters 4-6, (pp. 247-282)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 1 (pp. 103-111).

Leading the discussion: Miguel A. Rodriguez, student at Loyola University; and Ali Reza, Committee in Solidarity with the People of Iran

*********

August 8th — The Domination of “Dead” over “Living Labor”

The subject of this meeting is Marx’s discussion of the relation between the labor process and the valorization process, on the one hand, and constant capital and variable capital, on the other. This relation discloses the law of motion inherent in all forms of capitalism—whether in its “free market” or statist variants.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapters 7-8, (pp. 283-319)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 2 (pp. 112-119).

Leading the discussion: J Turk, U. S. Marxist-Humanists

*********

August 22nd — The Working Day and the Quest for a New Society

Why have automated and computerized forms of labor, which at one time were heralded as leading to a dramatic shortening of the working day, led instead to an increase in the amount of time that many spend at work? To what extent do efforts to shorten the working day and transform conditions of labor point to a possible alternative to the capitalist mode of production? We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues in the section of Capital on “The Working Day.”

Suggested Readings:
Capital, chapter 10, (pp. 340-416)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 3 (pp. 120-125).

Leading the discussion: Eileen Grace, Hobgoblin Collective

 

END***

 

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Karl Marx

MARX’S PHILOSOPHIC CRITIQUE OF CAPITAL

U.S. Marxist-Humanists in Chicago invite you to a series of meetings on:
Marx’s Philosophic Critique of Capital: An Exploration of the Grundrisse

Second and fourth Wednesdays In February, March and April
6:30pm-9pm
@ Harold Washington Library
400 S. State Street,
Third Floor- Room 3N-6

Chicago

Join us for a re-examination of Marx’s analysis of the logic of capital in light of the ongoing global economic and social crisis. The focus of these discussions will be Marx’s ‘Grundrisse’, his draft of ‘Capital’, in which he developed some of his most creative philosophic conceptions. The readings from Marx will be supplemented by selections from Philosophy and Revolution, by Raya Dunayevskaya.

Schedule and Readings

February 9th – The Historical Specificity of Capitalism in the United States: Led by Peter Hudis
Why has U.S. society given rise to claims of American exceptionalism? 
What is distinctive about the development about U.S. capitalism, as compared with Europe?

In what way do such questions relate to the current efforts to reduce government spending and subject society to the whims of the free market?

We will explore Marx’s approach to such questions, as posed his critique of Carey in his Grundrisse.

Reading: Bastiat and Carey, in Grundrisse, by Karl Marx (pp. 883-893)

February 23rd – The Dialectic of Political Economy: Led by J Turk
In what way did Hegel’s philosophy impact Marx’s analysis of capital, and to what extent does dialectical thought remain of importance in providing a comprehensive understanding of contemporary social developments?

We will explore Marx’s approach to these questions, as posed in his Introduction to the Grundrisse.

Readings:

Introduction, in Grundrisse by Karl Marx (pp. 83-111)
The 1840s: The Birth of Historical Materialism, in Philosophy and Revolution, by Raya Dunayevskaya (pp. 47-60)

March 9th – Alternatives to Capitalism: Past, Present and Future: Led by Anton Evelynov
Does Marx discuss the alternative to capitalism, and if so, what did he say about it?

Why was Marx critical of efforts in his day to limit the critique of capitalism to calls to abolish the free market; and how does that illuminate the shortcomings of 20th and 21st century efforts to transcend capitalism?

We will explore Marx’s approach to this, as posed in the Grundrisse’s critique of efforts to organize exchange.

Readings:
Critique of Darimon and Proudhon, in Grundrisse, pp. 122-140
On the Eve of World War II: Depression in the Economy and in Thought, by Raya Dunayevskaya, in Philosophy and Revolution, pp.123-127.

March 23rd – Marx’s Concept of the Universally Developed Individual: Led by Marilyn Nissim-Sabat
Why does Marx refer to capitalism as a system based on relation of personal independence that limits the scope of individual initiative and freedom?

Why does he pose the free association of individuals as an alternative to both pre-capitalist and capitalist modes of production?

How do these issues speak to today’s freedom struggles?

We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues in the part of the Grundrisse devoted to the development of universal needs and capacities.

Reading: Section on the Universality of Needs, in Grundrisse, pp. 156-173.

April 13th – Marx on Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations: Led by Eileen Grace
What was Marx’s understanding of forms of production, exchange, and communal association that precede capitalism?

Did he view pre-capitalist economic formations as containing, in embryo, indications of social and ecological relations that point beyond capitalism?

We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues in the famous section of the Grundrisse entitled Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations.

Readings:

Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations in Grundrisse, pp. 471-514
Progressive Epochs of Social Formation in Philosophy and Revolution, by Raya Dunayevskaya, pp. 68-76.

April 27th – The Automaton, Labor Time, and the Quest for a New Society: Led by Peter Hudis
Why has automated and computerized forms of labor, which at one time were heralded as leading to a dramatic shortening of the working day, led instead to an increase in the amount of time that many spend at work?

To what extent does machinery and technology hinder or assist the effort to transcend the alienation that characterizes much of present-day society?

We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues in the section of the Grundrisse on Machinery.

Readings:
Machinery, in Grundrisse, pp. 692-712
The Automaton and the Worker, in Philosophy and Revolution, pp. 76-94.

Texts
Please note that the Grundrisse is available online at: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1857/grundrisse/index.htm

Philosophy and Revolution by Raya Dunayevskaya is available from USMH

Sponsored by the U.S. Marxist-Humanists in Chicago, an affiliate of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization
Further information from http://USMarxistHumanists.org or by emailing arise@USMarxistHumanists.org

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Peter McLaren

WHAT DOES MARXIST-HUMANISM MEAN FOR TODAY?

Announcing an open forum in Chicago on…

What Does Marxist-Humanism Mean for Today?

Celebrating the Centenary of Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-1987)

As the global crisis of capitalism deepens, so too does the search for alternatives to it. This brings to life the contributions of Raya Dunayevskaya, an uncompromising critique of capitalism in both its “free market” and statist forms. Born in Ukraine in 1910, she was Leon Trotsky’s Russian-language secretary during his exile in Mexico. After breaking from him, she developed the analysis of the USSR as a “state-capitalist” society, published the first English translation of parts of Marx’s Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and from the 1950s through the 1980s developed the philosophy of Marxist-Humanism in a number of path breaking works. Join us for a discussion of how her ideas speak to issues now being debated by feminists, critical race theorists, and many others searching for new pathways to liberation.

Convenor: Lauren Langman, Sociology, Loyola University

Chair: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, author, Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity

Speakers:

Peter McLaren, author, Life in Schools, University of California, Los Angeles

David Schweickart, author, After Capitalism, Loyola University

Sandra Rein, author, Reading Dunayevskaya: Engaging the Emergence of Marxist-Humanism, University of Alberta

Ba Karang, writer for Africa-Links, West Africa

Kevin Anderson, author, Marx at the Margins, University of California at Santa Barbara

Peter Hudis, co-editor, The Rosa Luxemburg Reader, Loyola University

Friday July 2
6:30 p.m.
Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson, Room 0211 (1 block north of Chicago Ave; ½ block east of State St.)

Sponsored by Loyola University Department of Sociology and the U.S. Marxist-Humanists

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Raya Dunayevskaya