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Lost Generation

Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND THE EDUCATION THEY NEED

New free-to-view E-book 

Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley       

Download here:  e-book -why young people….

Or go to Radicaled: Rethinking Education, Economy and Society at: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/   

Already referred to as a ‘Lost Generation’, after almost two years of Coalition government, young people now have even less to look forward to and are likely to end up worse off than their parents. This publication builds on, develops and updates arguments from our book Lost Generation? New strategies for youth and education (2010) and, in particular, those in our previous e-pamphlet Why young people can’t get the jobs they want (2011)

A paper version is also available @ £3 per copy, contact mar.all@btinternet.com to order.

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Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT

By Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley

The current generation of young people are the most qualified but the most underemployed generation ever. Meanwhile, a third of men and a fifth of women between the ages of 20-34 still live with their parents – in most cases because they cannot afford otherwise.

This e-booklet explains why so many young people are unable of get the jobs and the lives that they want. It challenges claims about the growth of the ‘knowledge economy’ and questions the legitimacy of education programmes designed to ‘raise standards’. With the new Coalition government and most policy makers offering almost nothing, save ‘apprenticeships without jobs’ for the masses and ‘internships’ for ‘the squeezed middle’, the pamphlet offers some preliminary proposals to start addressing the problem.

Available as free download from Radicaled: Rethinking education, economy and society: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Dave Hill

STUDENTS IN REVOLT – TWO ARTICLES BY DAVE HILL

Articles by Dave Hill on the current student protests:

Hill, D. (2010) Students are Revolting: Education Cuts and Resistance, Radical Notes Journal, 3rd December, online at: http://radicalnotes.com/journal/2010/12/03/students-are-revolting-education-cuts-and-resistance/

Hill, D. (2010) Students Are Revolting: Education Cuts and Resistance, Socialist Resistance, 2nd December, online at:
http://socialistresistance.org/1135/students-are-revolting-education-cuts-and-resistance

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Lost

SOCIAL IMMOBILITY

Patrick Ainley and Martin Allen

The chatter about social mobility from a Coalition kicking away welfare services that have kept millions from poverty disguises the fact that there has been no real upward social mobility in Britain for the past 30 years and that nowadays the only social mobility is down.

Grand announcements – like Clegg’s £5 billion premium for the most educationally disadvantaged school pupils that seeks to compensate for the LibDems’ tuition fees capitulation – have repeatedly failed to create social mobility. Even in the post-war period when substantial numbers of young people moved into occupations paying more than those of their parents, there was little ‘relative’ mobility, ie. down as well as up. Rather than challenging the inequalities of the occupational order, the upward mobility that occurred merely meant there was some more room in the middle. Via selective grammar schooling it allowed limited working-class access to expanding professional and managerial occupations sustained by full male employment and the growing welfare state.

The development of comprehensive schools and more higher education contributed to widening aspirations. But this growth was as much a consequence as a cause of limited upward mobility. This was confirmed when a decline in mobility coincided with the partial abolition of grammar schools from 1965 on. (That this was coincidental can be seen in the USA when the same period of expansion of opportunities also ended despite all-through high schools since the war).

Hopes that an expanded middle afforded opportunities to educate the working class out of existence did not materialise. At best, there was an illusion of social mobility as the formerly manually working class shrank and many occupations were redefined as ‘professional’ and therefore requiring so-called ‘skills’ attested by educational qualifications. As a result, more people – especially women – now work in expanded office and service sectors but conditions of employment for this new non-manual working middle are increasingly insecure.

Blair and Brown put their faith in the globalised economy to provide new openings for those with qualifications at the expense of those without. New Labour’s campaign to raise ‘standards’ measured by qualifications led to unprecedented exam pass rates. Consequent allegations of ‘dumbing down’ came not only from traditionalists but also from some teachers, bullied by a  growing class of ‘managers’ (the new name for deputy and assistant head teachers) to meet targets that were raised as soon as they were achieved.

The main problem with New Labour’s ‘standards agenda’ however, was not the crushing of professional autonomy as lessons were delivered from templates so that what was taught became less important than how it could be assessed. It was far more fundamental. Whereas in the past, education was unfairly accused of failing the economy by not producing workplace skills when employers didn’t want them, now the economy has definitively failed education.

Rather than globalisation resulting in endless opportunities, employment prospects for most young people are in decline. This does not mean that there are no new professional and managerial vacancies but rather that, as ICT  sweeps through offices and work is outsourced if not exported, the term ‘white-collar employment’ is becoming meaningless. The main alternative to what are reduced to para-professions at best is a life in ‘customer services’. So it isn’t surprising that McDonalds report huge increases in applications from ‘qualified’ young people.

In a situation that we refer to as ‘education without jobs’, young people have to work harder and harder simply to maintain their place in the jobs queue. Gove’s announcement of a review of ‘vocational education’ will predictably relegate the majority to apprenticeships without jobs that will replay the Youth Training Schemes of the 1980s whilst privileging academic cramming for a minority.

Education has become like running up a down-escalator where you have to run faster and faster just to stand still as the former class pyramid has gone pear-shaped. The recent ‘social mobility’ rhetoric from politicians of all Parties disguises the fact that it is fear of downward social mobility that fuels the hysteria over educational competition for academic success.

The recession has made the situation of young people worse but it is not the cause of their problems. Likewise, we cannot ‘educate ourselves out of recession’ as even some teacher union and student leaders seem to think. Of course levels of educational provision should be defended but we also need to promote employment policies. As aspiring students face mortgaging their futures in hopes of eventual ‘graduate employment’, the promise of social mobility is exposed as a sham. Education faces its own credibility crunch and rising fees could finally burst the bubble. The main argument against them is – what else are school leavers expected to do?

Patrick Ainley and Martin Allen are the authors of Lost Generation? New strategies for youth and education, (Continuum, 2010)

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Higher Education Crisis

NEW ACTIVISM OR OLD POLITICS? SOUNDING STUDENT REACTION TO HIGHER EDUCATION’S CRISIS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Free Day Event

The Student Experience Network

New Activism or Old Politics? Sounding Student Reaction to HE’s Crisis

30th September 2010, 11am – 4:00pm

University of Aston, Birmingham

Room 404D, Main Building

This day event will discuss likely student reactions to the impending cuts and rising fees in higher education. It is free to staff and students in UK Higher Education/ anyone else interested, but please register below.

Timetable

10.30 Registration

11.00 Welcome by Patrick Ainley, Network co-coordinator and co-author of Lost Generation? Continuum 2010

11.15 Ben Little, University of Middlesex, talking on and around his free edited e-book: Radical Future – Politics for the Next Generation. Please read at http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/radicalfuture.html

12.15 Jonathan Ward, Studentforce for Sustainable Development – Brown Dystopia or Green Hope?

1.15 Lunch

1.45 Jim Dickinson, Director of Campaigns and Strategy, NUS

2.45 Queen Mary College London University Countermappers and/or members of the Really Open University

3.45 Plenary discussion as and when.. tea and depart

Chairs am Joyce Canaan, Birmingham City University; pm Sarah Amsler, Aston University

A full guide to travelling to Aston, including campus maps, is available at http://www1.aston.ac.uk/about/directions/. The campus is a short walk from all Birmingham train stations. The university does not have visitor parking, but visitors with special needs can request a pass by emailing Dr Sarah Amsler (s.s.amsler@aston.ac.uk) and there is paid parking nearby.

Next meeting: 2 – 4 on November 24th November at University College London: Dr. R.T.Allen The Value of the Inexact, Michael Polanyi’s philosophy of tacit integration in relation to teaching and assessment (further details to follow).

New Activism or Old Politics is free, but please confirm attendance with Patrick at Patrickjdainley@aol.com

Nicola Manches, Administrative Assistant, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

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Lost Generation

DISCOURSE, POWER AND RESISTANCE IN EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2011

DPR10: Discourse, Power, Resistance Conference 2011

Theme: CHANGING EDUCATION

University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, 13-15 April 2011
Sponsored by the School of Secondary and Further Education Studies

Official DPR Conference Website: http://www.dprconference.com

The DPR conference returns to Plymouth in its tenth year, bringing together learners, teachers, researchers and policy-makers from the international education community to look at the crises in contemporary education, not just at post-compulsory level but across the board from pre-school to post-graduate. The need for change in education has never been more urgent. The conference will bring colleagues from around the world to think radically about education changing, and needing to change.

The conference will be divided into 7 streams:

– What is the point of education?
– Anticipative education: policy and practice
– Education in a funding crisis
– Widening participation: for real
– Education across the boundaries of faith: challenging fear and hatred
– The future of post-compulsory education: the internet and 
   the role of the university
– DPR: open

The DPR conference is a site for the radical critique of discourse, power and resistance within and beyond the discipline of education, looking at concerns which are currently troubling learners, teachers and researchers engaged at all stages from pre-school to postgraduate. The conference looks more widely at the impact on education of powerful interests in and behind the policy-making apparatus as they exert their influence to reshape the goals and ethos of learning, teaching and research. DPR transgresses inter-disciplinary boundaries, attracting scholars from across the humanities and social sciences. A continuing concern of the conference is the contested issue of research methodology and the related issues of the problem of knowledge.

The conference has an international reputation, drawing delegates from a wide range of the developed and developing nations and attracting world-class keynote speakers.

The DPR journal, Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER), was launched in 2009.

For full information, including a Call for Papers and registration details, please visit the conference website: http://www.dprconference.com

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Lost Generation?

LOST GENERATION?Originally from Ruth Rikowski News Updates Progression: http://ruthrikowskiupdates.blogspot.com/

Patrick Ainley, a friend and writing colleague of ours, has a new book coming out which he has co-written with Martin Allen. Here are the details:

Lost Generation? New Strategies for Youth and Education’ by Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley, Continuum: London, 2010
ISBN 9781441134707 (pbk)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lost-Generation-Strategies-Youth-Education/dp/1441134700/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267391315&sr=8-1

The book looks at what has gone wrong in schools, colleges and universities and how this relates to the changing relationship between young people and educational qualifications. It goes right through from primary schools to postgraduate schools. Ainley and Allen argue that a new pedagogy is needed, along with a new educational politics, which will bring students and teachers together in new concepts of education and democracy.

Wes Streeting, President of National Union of Students says that the book is:
“A thought-provoking critique of the education system at a critical time for Britain’s “lost generation” of young people.”

To place an order, email orders@continuumbooks.com

This book builds on and develops Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley’s previous publication, which is:

‘Education Make You Fick, Innit?: What’s Gone Wrong with England’s Schools, Colleges and Universities and How to Start Putting it Right’, Tufnell Press: London, 2007. ISBN: 1872767672; 978-1872767673
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Education-Make-You-Fick-Innit/dp/1872767672/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1267435143&sr=8-2-fkmr0

I think that what this book is about is fairly self-evident from the title!

Ruth Rikowski

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