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Idea Store – Whitechapel

WRITEIDEA FESTIVAL 2017

East London’s Free Reading Festival

Sun, 19 Nov 2017, 13:00

Idea Store, 321 Whitechapel Road, London, E1 1BU

The ninth Writeidea Festival, Tower Hamlets Council’s unique free reading festival, will take place at Idea Store Whitechapel over the weekend of 17 – 19 November 2017

The festival is an integral part of the reading offer of Idea Store, the innovative library, learning and information service created by Tower Hamlets Council.

There are some fantastic speakers again this year including Stella Duffy, Alan Dein, Gregor Gall, The Gentle Author and Irenosen Okojie.

Programme & Tickets: https://www.ideastore.co.uk/writeidea and https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/writeidea-festival-2017-14917965862

Critical Education

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Stuart Hood

Stuart Hood

STUART HOOD (1915-2011)

CENTENARY DAY CONFERENCE

Open University in London and the South-East

1-11 Hawley Crescent

London NW1 8NP

(Near Camden Town tube on the Northern Line)

Saturday November 28

10.30 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.

We hope to provide coffee and tea and there will be a social space for discussion over lunch (not provided). There are takeway catering facilities nearby.

There is no conference fee.  But please register your attendance with Hilary Horrocks at: hilaryhorrocks@btinternet.com as the venue has a limited capacity.

*

Stuart Hood, born in small-town NE Scotland in 1915, volunteered for army service in 1940 and was captured in the North African desert while stationed in Cairo with British Intelligence. He was released from an Italian prisoner of war camp at the time of the Armistice in September 1943 and, during an almost-year-long journey to meet the Allied advance, fought with Tuscan partisans, participating in the now semi-mythologised Battle of Valibona (January 1944). His memoir Pebbles from My Skull (1963), often republished, mainly as Carlino, is a classic reflection on his time in war-torn Italy. He worked for 17 years at the BBC, resigning in frustration from the position of Controller of Programmes, Television, in 1963, having been responsible for programmes such as Z-Cars and That Was the Week That Was. He made important documentaries including The Trial of [Soviet dissidents] Daniel and Sinyavsky; and was briefly Professor of Media Studies at the Royal College until asked to resign following his support for student protests. He latterly taught at the University of Sussex. He was a distinguished translator, particularly from German (including the poems of his great friend, Erich Fried) and Italian (including work by Dario Fo and Pier Paolo Pasolini). Returning to an earlier career as a fiction writer, he published a series of novels – A Storm from Paradise (1985), The Upper Hand (1987), The Brutal Heart (1989), A Den of Foxes (1991), and The Book of Judith (1995) – which draw on his Scottish childhood, his wartime experiences and his encounters with, amongst others, members of the Baader-Meinhof group. He joined the Communist Party as a student in Edinburgh but after the war was an anti-Stalinist socialist and briefly, in the 1970s, a member of the Workers Revolutionary Party. Influenced by the class-conscious trade unionists he had met in his university days, he was, also in the 1970s, an active Vice-President of the film and TV technicians’ union, ACTT.

Provisional conference programme follows …

 

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME (subject to amendment)

10.30 Arrival and Registration

10.45 Welcome, Terry Brotherstone and David Johnson

 

10.50-11.50 Session One

10.50 Showing of extracts from Stuart Hood’s documentary return to his childhood home, A View from Caterthun, with commentary by filmmakers Don Coutts and Christeen Winford.

11.20 Hilary Horrocks (freelance editor and independent researcher), ‘Stuart Hood, Partigiano – finding traces today in Emilio-Romagna and Tuscany’.

 

11.55-12.45 Session Two

11.55 Phil Cooke (University of Strathclyde), ‘The Italian Resistance: recent work on the historical context of Carlino’.

12.20 Karla Benske (Glasgow Caledonian University), ‘Showcasing the “compexity of human reactions”: an appreciation of Stuart Hood’s novels’.

 

12.45 Lunch

 

2.00-3.15 Session Three

2.00 Robert Lumley (University College, London), ‘Keeping Faith: revisiting interviews with Stuart Hood’.

2.25 Brian Winston (University of Lincoln) and Tony Garnett (film and TV director and producer), ‘Stuart Hood and the Media’.

3.15-3.30 Break

 

3.30-4.45 Session Four

3.30 David Johnson (Open University), ‘Stuart Hood, Scottish Literature and Scottish Nationalism’.

3.55 Haim Bresheeth (London School of Economics), ‘Working with Stuart on the Holocaust’.

4.20 Terry Brotherstone (University of Aberdeen) will lead a discussion on Stuart Hood’s politics, including his involvement in the 1970s with the Workers Revolutionary Party.

 

4.45-5.30 Session Five

4.45 Final reflections and future proposals.

5.15 Close.

5.30 Social gathering nearby.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/stuart-hood-1915-2011-centenary-day-conference-28-november

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (9)THE MAKING OF THE HUMANITIES V

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANELS

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

5–7 October 2016

The fifth conference on the history of the humanities, ‘The Making of the Humanities V’, will take place at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (USA), from 5 till 7 October 2016.

Goal of the Making of the Humanities (MoH) Conferences

The MoH conferences are organized by the Society for the History of the Humanities and bring together scholars and historians interested in the history of a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, musicology, philology, and media studies, tracing these fields from their earliest developments to the modern day.

We welcome panels and papers on any period or region. We are especially interested in work that transcends the history of specific humanities disciplines by comparing scholarly practices across disciplines and civilizations.

Please note that the Making of the Humanities conferences are not concerned with the history of art, the history of music or the history of literature, etc., but instead with the history of art history, the history of musicology, the history of literary studies, etc.

Structure of the Conference

MoH-V will feature three days of panel and paper sessions, next to three keynote speakers and a closing panel on the Status of the Humanities. A reception will take place on the first day in the magnificent Peabody Library, and a banquet on the second day. An overview of the previous conferences and resulting publications is on the Society’s homepage.

Keynote Speakers MoH-V

Karine Chemla (ERC project SAW, SPHERE, CNRS & U. Paris Diderot): “Writing the history of ancient mathematics in China and beyond in the 19th century: who? for whom?, and how?”

Anthony Grafton (Princeton U.): “Christianity and Philology: Blood Wedding?”

Sarah Kay (New York U.): “Inhuman Humanities and the Artes that Make up Medieval Song”

Abstract Submissions

Abstracts of single papers (25 minutes including discussion) should be in Word format and contain the name of the speaker, full contact address (including email address), the title and a summary of the paper of maximally to historyhumanities@gmail.com.

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2016

Notification of acceptance: End of June 2016

Panel Submissions

Panels last 1.5 hours and can consist of 3-4 papers including discussion and possibly a commentary. Panel proposals should be in Word format and contain respectively the name of the chair, the names of the speakers and commentator, full contact addresses (including email addresses), the title of the panel, a short (150 words) description of the panel’s content and for each paper an abstract of maximally 250 words. Panel proposals should be sent (in Word) to historyhumanities@gmail.com.

Deadline for panel proposals: 30 April 2016 Notification of acceptance: End of June 2016

Registration and Accommodation

Registration for the conference will be possible from April 2016. The conference fee will be kept as low as possible (the exact fee and information on student discount will be published in April 2016). Details about the conference fee and accommodation will also be posted in April 2016.

Organization and Support

Amsterdam Centre for Cultural Heritage and Identity

The Humanities Center, JHU

The Sheridan Libraries, JHU

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

Huizinga Institute of Cultural History

MoH International Committee

Rens Bod (U. of Amsterdam), Christopher Celenza (JHU, Baltimore), Hent de Vries (JHU, Baltimore), Julia Kursell (U. of Amsterdam), Fenrong Liu (Tsinghua University), Jaap Maat (U. of Amsterdam), Helen Small (U. of Oxford), Thijs Weststeijn (U. of Amsterdam)

MoH Local Organizing Committee

Stephen Nichols (JHU), Hent de Vries (JHU), Christopher Celenza (JHU)

History of Humanities Journal

Selected conference papers will be published in the new journal History of Humanities. The first issue is due to appear in March 2016.

images (10)

History of Humanities Journal: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/hoh.html

The Making of the Humanities Conferences: http://makingofthehumanities.blogspot.co.uk/

Society for the History of Humanities: http://www.historyofhumanities.org/2015/10/29/call-for-papers-and-panels-the-making-of-humanities-v/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)

Dreamscape

Dreamscape

PRETERNATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: DREAMSCAPES, ALTERNATE REALITIES, LANDSCAPES OF DREAD

Call for Papers for a special issue of Preternature (Issue 6.1)

Preternatural Environments: Dreamscapes, Alternate Realities, Landscapes of Dread

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2016.

This special issue of Preternature seeks papers that examine elements and/or depictions of the preternatural in all sorts of environments. Scholars are increasingly drawing attention to the importance of spaces and their contexts, the stories we tell about them, and our interactions with them. This volume focuses on preternatural aspects of natural and unnatural environments such as dreamscapes, alternate worlds, and eerie landscapes.

Papers should investigate the connections between preternatural environments and literary, historical, anthropological, and artistic forms of understanding. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Defining the “preternatural environment” / preternatural aspects of an environment.
  • Superstition and spaces.
  • Demonic domains.
  • Artistic representations of preternatural environments across the ages.
  • Aspects of the uncanny in various physical settings.
  • The pathetic fallacy and narrative theory.
  • “Unnatural” landscapes and environments.
  • Bridging natural and preternatural spaces.
  • Preternatural ecology and ecocriticism.
  • Connections between material environments, literary narratives, and the preternatural.
  • Eerie landscapes as characters or significant presences in literature, history, and culture.
  • How preternatural environments inform human behaviour, or how behaviour informs preternatural environments.

Preternature welcomes a variety of approaches, including narrative theory, ecocriticism, and behavioural studies from any cultural, literary, artistic, or historical tradition and from any time period. We particularly encourage submissions dealing with non-Western contexts.

Contributions should be 8,000 – 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus.

For more information, see: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_submis_Preternature.html or submit directly at: https://www.editorialmanager.com/preternature/default.aspx.

Preternature is published twice annually by the Pennsylvania State Press and is available through JSTOR and Project Muse. This periodical is also indexed in the ATLA Religion Database® (ATLA RDB®), http://www.atla.com.

images (21)

Preternature: Critical and Historical Studies on the Preternatural can be viewed at: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/preternature/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (22)

David Mabb

David Mabb

DAVID MABB

At the William Morris Gallery
Lloyd Park, Forest Road
Walthamstow, London, E17 4PP
020 8496 4390
London, United Kingdom
27 June to 27 September 2015

Open Wednesday to Sunday, 10am – 5pm; free

William Morris and Russian artist El Lissitzky both wanted to change people’s lives through their art. Whilst Morris saw beauty in the past, Lissitzky sought a new visual language for the future.

In his latest work, British artist David Mabb celebrates the utopian ideas of these two men through their seminal book designs: Morris’s Kelmscott Chaucer and Lissitzky’s For the Voice, a revolutionary book of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky considered one of the finest achievements in Russian avant-garde bookmaking.

Comprising 30 canvasses, Announcer takes over the gallery space, interweaving and contrasting the two designs so that Morris and Lissitzky’s graphic s are never able to fully merge or separate.

William Morris Gallery: http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/

WMimages

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Raymond Williams

Raymond Williams

POLITICS AND LETTERS: INTERVIEWS WITH ‘NEW LEFT REVIEW’

OUT NOW, WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION:

Politics and Letters: Interviews with New Left Review

BY RAYMOND WILLIAMS

INTRODUCTION BY GEOFF DYER

The celebrated literary critic Raymond Williams, in his own words

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1832-politics-and-letters

————

Raymond Williams made a central contribution to the intellectual culture of the Left in the English-speaking world. He was also one of the key figures in the foundation of cultural studies in Britain, which turned critical skills honed on textual analysis to the examination of structures and forms of resistance apparent in everyday life. Politics and Letters is a volume of interviews with Williams, conducted by New Left Review, designed to bring into clear focus the major theoretical and political issues posed by his work. Introduced by writer Geoff Dyer, Politics and Letters ranges across Williams’s biographical development, the evolution of his cultural theory and literary criticism, his work on dramatic forms and his fiction, and an exploration of British and international politics.

RAYMOND WILLIAMS (1921–1988) was for many years Professor of Drama at the University of Cambridge. Among his many books are Culture and Society, Culture and Materialism, Politics and Letters, Problems in Materialism and Culture, and several novels.——-

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“Effectively a new kind of book … an outstanding feat of composition … a remarkable human achievement.” – Guardian

“For anybody interested in the relationship between literature and society in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries this book is essential reading.” – Financial Times

“An absolutely riveting piece of work.” – New Society

“This is, quite simply, one of the most magnificent books I have read.” – Philip Corrigan, Media, Culture and Society

“Raymond Williams has made a more persistent attempt to grasp the nature of this relation [between politics and letters] than any living British writer.” – London Review of Books

————

PAPERBACK: APRIL 2015 / 464 pages / ISBN: 9781784780159 / £14.99 / $26.95 / $32 (Canada)

POLITICS AND LETTERS is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1832-politics-and-letters

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list: https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

 

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/politics-and-letters-interviews-with-new-left-review-by-raymond-williams-out-now

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

A free adaptation of Zamyatin’s prospective novel “We”, this concept album will take you in the wake of D–503 and I–330, two freedom-and-passion loving people.

A Dystopia tinged with Revolutionary Romanticism, first of its kind.

Album available from January 15th 2015

 

Rémi Orts

Brave New World, 1984, The Wall, Equilibrium and more recently The Hunger Games, modern culture is haunted by the spectre of extremely well-organized societies whose apparent perfection conceals dark dictatorial worlds.

If this formal exercise is known to all, what is the intimate origin, the true source of its inspiration?
In fact, everything comes from a small Russian sci-fi novel published in 1920 by Yevgeny Zamyatin, “We “.

Rémi Orts Project and Alan B wish to pay tribute to this counter-utopia, first of its kind, by revisiting it in their concept album, “The Glass Fortress”.

Let yourself be taken in the wake of Daniel and Iris, two human beings opposed in every way, that nonetheless will rejoin in the same destiny, the choice of Life, even at their own peril…

Adapted from this album, a short film, innovative and moving, will be released in April 2015 with the collaboration of the talented photographer, Fanny Storck.

Lyrics : Alan B
Music : Rémi Orts
Photos : Fanny Storck
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPuAwNUSLI8&list=PL5KtMvKvWwKDcTibMWVLeKg5YoHuCsZZ-&index=1

See: http://www.remiorts.com/index.php/albums-remiorts/41-remi-project/96-the-glass-fortress

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Vampyrica John-Paul Van-Huysse

Vampyrica
John-Paul Van-Huysse

SUBREALISM

Subrealism:  One Day Conference on Ettingerian Studies, Friday 10 October 2014, Aula Maxima, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland

Details: http://subrealismtheworkofbrachalichtenbergettinger.wordpress.com/conference/

This one-day conference features invited presentations on recent shifts in Ettingerian studies focusing particularly on gender studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, literature, ethics, aesthetics, art practice, psychoanalytic practice, political science  and philosophy.

 

For information on the work of Bracha L. Ettinger, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracha_L._Ettinger

http://www.mamsie.bbk.ac.uk/documents/Giffney_Mulhall_ORourke.pdf

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bracha-L-Ettinger/46707662527

 

For more on Speculative Realism see Michael O’Rourke’s introduction, Specrealisms, at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9566568/Specrealisms

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Session 1: 10.00-11.15am

Graham Price: ‘Deconstruction and the Art-Encounter-Event’

Moynagh Sullivan: ‘An Ear to the Earth’:Matrixial Gazing in Tim Robinson’s Walk-Art-Text Practice’

Tea Break: 11.15-11.30am

Session 2: 11.30am-12.45pm

Noirin MacNamara: ‘Matrixial Theory and la démocratie à-venir’

Michael O’Rourke: ‘Specrealisms’

Lunch: 12.45-1.45pm

Session 3: 1.45-3.15pm

Medb Ruane: ‘Writing Art, Talking Psychoanalysis: sketches from a Bracha Ettinger notebook’

Paula McCloskey: ‘Artificial intelligence, art and affect: Exploring the matrixial possibilities in Micha Cárdenas Becoming-Dragon and Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway, Black Shoals Stock Market Planetarium’

Elena Marchevska: ‘The last place where we were together…’

Tea Break: 3.15-3.45pm

Session 4: 3.45-5.00pm

Dimitra Douskos: ‘Translating into French, translating into language’

Tina Kinsella: ‘Surrealism to Subrealism’

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Russell Brand

Russell Brand

THE READING AGENCY LECTURE 2014: RUSSELL BRAND

Russell Brand to give The Reading Agency Lecture

Russell Brand will deliver The Reading Agency Lecture on 25 November 2014, 7.00-8.00pm.

See: http://readingagency.org.uk/news/media/russell-brand-to-give-the-reading-agency-lecture.html

The Reading Agency Lecture will take place in The Logan Hall at the Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

You can buy tickets for the lecture from Eventbrite.

Tickets are priced at £20 and £10 for concessions (under 24s).

The lecture was initiated by The Reading Agency in 2012. It aims to provide a platform for leading writers and thinkers to share original, challenging ideas about the future of reading in the UK.

Russell Brand will deliver ‘a manifesto on reading’ which will be in part personal, sharing his own experience of books and reading while growing up in the UK; and it will be in part as a public figure, sharing his views on the status of reading and storytelling in our national culture and why reading is important for young people – especially boys – in the UK today.

Russell Brand says:

“Writing is the most intimate medium. Right there in the brain, in the swamp of fear and desire. I like splashing about in there, stirring up sediment, doing the breaststroke. In this lecture I will try and drag this metaphor out for an hour.”

Further information: http://readingagency.org.uk/adults/get-involved/002-events/russell-brand-a-manifesto-on-reading.html

‘The Bookseller’: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/russell-brand-give-reading-agency-lecture

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Philosophy and Romanticism

Philosophy and Romanticism

ROMANTIC REMAINS

 

MICHAEL NICHOLSON (CHAIR)

SPECIAL SESSION – NASSR 2015

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

 

Remain(s):

To be left behind after the removal, use, or destruction of some part, number, or quantity.

To continue in the same place or with the same person; to abide, to stay.

The survivors of a war, battle, or other destructive event.

A relic of some obsolete custom or practice; a surviving trait or characteristic.

A part or the parts of a person’s body after death; a corpse.

The literary works or fragments (esp. the unpublished ones) left by an author after death

[OED]

 

Romantic culture’s most familiar rhetorics of revolution are progressive, teleological, messianic, and apocalyptic. Building upon the etymology of the term “remain(s)” as a term that denotes survival and persistence as much as death and decay, “Romantic Remains” will consider the whole range of “remain(s)” in relation to “rights” (political, cultural, literary, scientific, environmental, corporeal, and otherwise). This panel will therefore theorize the era’s less critically prominent forms of protest such as stasis, resistance, delay, disappearance, survival, and/or endurance. In a moment whose most prominent poetic works, embodied individual lives, and grand political narratives focus on vigor, life, growth, evolution, and development — Wordsworth’s “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive,” Barbauld’s “Little Invisible Being Who is Expected Soon to Become Visible,” and Shelley’s “Life, Joy, Empire, and Victory”—who or what gets left behind? What radical possibilities lie on the other side of Romanticism’s forward thinkingforms of enthusiasm, passion, utopianism, and optimism?

As the necessary consequence of works such as Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey and Volney’s Ruins, Romantic critics have always taken an interest in Europe’s physical remains. Yet in our present moment of environmental catastrophe and ruin, a diverse array of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholars have drawn new attention to the possibilities and anxieties of contingent, biodegradable, unhurried, and uncertain forms of existence and aesthetics: Kevis Goodman and Jonathan Sachs (slow time), Jonathan Bate and James C. McKusick (Romantic ecology and green writing), Paul Fry (ontological radicalism), Anahid Nersessian (nescience), Anne-Lise François (recessive agency), Timothy Morton (dark ecology), and Jacques Khalip (anonymity and dispossession). In its focus on natural rhythms, formal omissions, and vanishing acts rather than developmental narratives or confident subjects, this panel will turn toward a critique of the idea that Romanticism always proceeds though rapid movement and productive presence. With this end in mind, we will study the period’s conservationist energies in the realms of ontology, politics, and aesthetics—how the positions of remaining behind, moving slowly, and entirely disappearing often allowed Romantic writers to contest the excesses of an increasingly accelerating age focused on imperial expansion, economic development, and sociocultural improvement.

Papers may consider “Romantic Remains” in relation to a wide range of formal, historical, theoretical, and critical concerns, that might include:

–necromanticism / material remains: corpses, ruins, relics, residues, wastes, wrecks, dust, rubble, and debris

–formal remains: elegies, epitaphs, scraps, elisions, gaps, fragments, caesurae, ellipses, and repetitions

–biological / natural processes: decomposition, defilement, deterioration, erosion, putrefaction, and decay

–the poetics of nostalgia / memory and ephemerality / forgetting

–outmoded, suspended, superseded, and left over genres, modes, and personae

–spatial remains: localism, dispossession, immovability, and immobility

–temporal remains: anachronism, haunting, and gradualism

–textual / authorial negotiations of invisibility, abjection, anonymity, disappearance, obscurity, and reanimation

–memorialization and categories of identity such as gender, race, class, sexuality, and disability

–biodegradable / sustainable aesthetics

–scientific and antiquarian analyses of extinction, rebirth, evolution, and survival

–the ruins of Romantic criticism and theory / the remains of Romantic literary history / the afterlives of Romantic writing

 

General Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/cfp/

Special Sessions Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/sessions/

 

GENERAL CALL FOR PAPERS:

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NSSR)

The 23rd Annual NASSR Conference Winnipeg, Manitoba, August 13-16, 2015

Sponsored by University of Manitoba and The University of Winnipeg, NASSR 2015 will meet at the historic Fort Garry Hotel near The Forks in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, from August 13 to 16, 2015.

The theme of the conference is “Romanticism & Rights,” broadly construed to include:

  • Human Rights (racial, indigenous, economic; right to freedom and autonomy [slavery])
  • Animal Rights; Natural Rights, Nature’s rights (the environment)
  • Sexual Rights (alternative genders, women’s rights, procreative rights)
  • Author or Authorial Rights (intellectual property, copyright)
  • State/Sovereign Rights
  • Children’s Rights
  • Right to be heard; Freedom of Speech
  • The Right to Philosophy / Thinking
  • Right to Religion
  • Rights and Wrongs
  • The Right to Die
  • What is left of Rights?

For information on the 2015 NASSR call for papers, including special sessions, click on the “Call for Papers” menu item above.
Conference Co-Chairs:
Michelle Faubert, University of Manitoba
Peter Melville, The University of Winnipeg

Conference Committee:
Linda Dietrick, The University of Winnipeg
Murray Evans, The University of Winnipeg
Joshua D. Lambier, Western University
Dana Medoro, University of Manitoba
Pam Perkins, University of Manitoba
Kathryn Ready, The University of Winnipeg
Armelle St. Martin, University of Manitoba
Contact NASSR 2015: nassr15@umanitoba.ca

NASSR Main Website: http://publish.uwo.ca/~nassr/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Nietzsche

Nietzsche

TRISTANO

By Nanni Balestrini

——————-

This book is unique as no other novel can claim to be: one of 109,027,350,432,000 possible variations of the same work of fiction. A love story with infinite possibilities

AVAILABLE NOW: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1518-tristano

——————-

Inspired by the legend of Tristan and Isolde, Tristano was first published in 1966 in Italian. But only recently has digital technology made it possible to realize the author’s original vision. The novel comprises ten chapters, and the fifteen pairs of paragraphs in each of these are shuffled anew for each published copy. No two versions are the same. The random variations between copies enact the variegations of the human heart, as exemplified by the lovers at the center of the story.

The copies of the English translation of Tristano are individually numbered, starting from 10,000 (running sequentially from the Italian and German editions). Included is a foreword by Umberto Eco explaining how Balestrini’s experiment with the physical medium of the novel demonstrates ‘that originality and creativity are nothing more than the chance handling of a combination’.

——————-
Read Nanni Balestrini’s interview with Lizzy Davies in THE GUARDIAN here
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/feb/13/nanni-balestrini-tristano-novel-technology

——————-

“The emotional highs and lows of the story are all the more touching for being framed within Balestrini’s subtle, understated language.” – Juliet Jacques, NEW STATESMAN

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/02/nanni-balestrinis-tristano-love-story-100-trillion-possible-plotlines

“Balestrini’s experiment focuses on attacking the twin myths of the creative genius and culture as property.” – RHIZOME

“Goodbye Gutenberg. Many alternative ways of spreading the adventure of literature are emerging. This exercise by Balestrini is absolutely central.” – LA STAMPA

“Finally the historical impasse between literature and new media… turns into an opportunity to create something radically new.” – Aldo Nove, IL SOLE 24 ORE

“Balestrini has created with Tristano a kind of poetry of the language … promoting language to the role of protagonist, that is of hero, and where in traditional novels language voices the hero’s thoughts and actions, in this new Tristano language voices itself and celebrates its wide number of opportunities and movements.” – Angelo Guglielmi, L’UNITA

“The most impressive feat of publishing in ages.” – BLACKWELL’S OXFORD

——————-

Nanni Balestrini was born in Milan in 1935 and was a member of the influential avant-garde Gruppo 63, along with Umberto Eco and Eduardo Sanguineti. He is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, including ‘Blackout’ and ‘Ipocalisse’, and novels such as ‘Tristano’, ‘Vogliamo Tutto’, and ‘La Violenza Illustrata’.

During the notorious mass arrests of writers and activists associated with Autonomy, which began in 1979, Balestrini was charged with membership of an armed organization and with subversive association. He went underground to avoid arrest and fled to France. As in so many other cases, no evidence was provided and he was acquitted of all the charges.

He currently lives in Rome, where he runs the monthly magazine of cultural intervention ‘Alfabeta2’ with Umberto Eco and others.

——————-

Paperback, 128 pages / ISBN: 9781781681695 / February 2014 / $25.00 / £14.99 / $28.00CAN

To learn more about TRISTANO and to purchase the book visit  http://www.versobooks.com/books/1518-tristano

——————-

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Become a fan of Verso on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk