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Raya Dunayevskaya

MARXIST-HUMANIST WEBSITE

FROM US MARXIST-HUMANISTS http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

JUNE 10, 2010

OUR NEWLY REVAMPED WEBSITE CONTAINS THESE FEATURED AND CURRENT ARTICLES:

Peter Hudis, co-editor of the Rosa Luxemburg Reader, “Today’s Global Financial/Economic Crisis and the Legacy of Rosa Luxemburg”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/todays-global-financialeconomic-crisis-and-the-legacy-of-rosa-luxemburg/

Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins, “From the Grundrisse to Capital, Multilinear Themes”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/from-the-grundrisse-to-capital-multilinear-themes/

David Black, author of Helen Macfarlane, “Why Philosophy? Why Now? On the Revolutionary Legacies of Raya Dunayevskaya, CLR James, and Anton Pannekoek”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/why-philosophy-why-now-on-the-revolutionary-legacies-of-raya-dunayevskaya-clr-james-and-anton-pannekoek/

Eli Messinger, radical psychiatrist, “Review Essay: Michael Löwy’s The Theory of Revolution in the Young Marx”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/review-essay-michael-lowy%E2%80%99s-the-theory-of-revolution-in-the-young-marx/

Statement of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization, “We Are All Palestinians Now”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/we-are-all-palestinians-now/

Ba Karang, writer for Africa Links, “Africom and the USA’s Hidden Battle Front in Africa”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/africom-and-the-usa%E2%80%99s-hidden-battle-front-in-africa/

Kamran Afary, author of Performance and Activism, and Kevin Anderson, “Behind the 2009 Upheaval in Iran”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/authors/kamran-afary/

Batay Ouvriye (Haiti), “Behind the January 12, 2010 Haiti Earthquake”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/after-the-january-12-2010-haiti-earthquake/

Peter Hudis and Kevin Anderson, interview with Simon Birnbaum for iz3w, “The Obama Effect Undermines the Left” (in German and English)
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/the-obama-effect-undermines-the-left/

Dale Parsons, labor activist, “A Deeper Look at the Massey Coal Mine Deaths”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/a-deeper-look-at-massey-coal-mine-deaths/

Statement of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization, “Support the People of Afghanistan and Pakistan in the Face of Imperialist War and Fundamentalist Retrogression”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/support-the-people-of-afghanistan-and-pakistan-in-the-face-of-imperialist-war-and-fundamentalist-retrogression/

Yasmin Nair, LGBT activist, “What’s Left of Queer?: Immigration, Sexuality, and Affect in a Neoliberal World”
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/articles/what%E2%80%99s-left-of-queer-immigration-sexuality-and-affect-in-a-neoliberal-world/

THE SITE ALSO INCLUDES A GROWING ARCHIVE OF EARLIER ARTICLES FROM THE PAST DECADE

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William Godwin

ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

For a book entitled

Anarchist Pedagogies

Editor: Robert Haworth PhD

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Overview:

Anarchist movements have a long history of resisting traditional schooling and authoritative pedagogical practices, while at the same time, attempting to construct transformative educative processes. Examples include Francisco Ferrer’s (1913) work entitled, Origins of the Modern School and the creation of the Escuela Moderna schools in Spain, the Modernist Schools in the United States (Emma Goldman, Voltaraine de Cleyre, Alex Berkman and others) during the early 20th century as well as contemporary anarchists who are experimenting in participatory informal learning spaces. These examples are important to acknowledge within radical notions of teaching and learning being that they are experiences that enable activists and scholars to critically re-imagine education and build theories on “how” and “where” individuals experiment in constructing knowledge through differing learning spaces (Coté, Day & Peuter, 2007; de Leon, 2008, Malott, forthcoming).

Moreover, as totalizing efforts of the nation-state continue to develop standardized curriculum, efficiency models and data driven outcomes, anarchist pedagogies attempt to construct ongoing collective learning environments that can be described as ‘disciplined improvisation’ or ‘spontaneous’ in nature (Goldman, 1969; Haworth, forthcoming; Sawyer, 2003; Ward, 1972). Furthermore, these informal learning spaces create new ways of exposing illegitimate corporate and state power, as well as participating in the ‘coming communities’ (Day, 2007).

This edited book calls on international scholars (15 single authored or collectively authored chapters) in anarchist studies to critically reflect on historical and contemporary experimentations in anarchist pedagogies. Scholarly efforts will focus on what we have learned from past anarchist experiences and current transformative learning environments — where individuals are engaged in collective, participatory, voluntary and mutual efforts that contest global capitalist structures.

The edited collection responds to the need to reflect on anarchist pedagogies and will highlight three major themes. Authors in the first section will be encouraged to focus on historical discussions surrounding anarchism and education. The authors will give introspective critiques of historical practices, including theories of teaching and learning and alternatives to compulsory public schools. Authors in the second section will construct philosophical and theoretical frameworks evolving from contemporary anarchists, particularly through individuals participating in cooperatives, independent media collectives, infoshops, political zines, open source projects, DIY, direct action networks and other autonomous and cultural spaces.

Continued efforts to construct theoretical and philosophical discussions surrounding anarchism have also provided opportunities to build affinities and tensions with frameworks outside of anarchist writings (Cohn, 2007). The third section will encompass anarchist theories of teaching and learning. Authors will be asked to construct linkages and apprehensions to theories surrounding critical pedagogies and critical theory, autonomous Marxism, postmodernity and poststruturalism.

Proposed sections:

Forward:

Zack de la Rocha

1) Introduction

2) Section 1: Anarchism & Education: Historical experimentations

a. Anarchist perspectives on education

b. Modern Schools; Spain and the United States

c. Pedagogical practices: teacher/student relationship

d. Issues of the state and compulsory education

e. Connection and/or tensions between progressive education and social reconstruction

f. What have we learned?

3) Section 2: Anarchist Pedagogies in the “here and now”

a. Contesting power through multiple fronts: Movements against neoliberalism and learning through collective processes: Infoshops, cooperatives, autonomous spaces, zines, DIY

b. Teaching and learning in non-hierarchical, mutual and voluntary spaces — issues surrounding race, class, gender, LGBT

c. Technology: Issues surrounding the use of technology: open source, listservs, blogs & discussion boards

4) Section 3: Anarchism: Theoretical Frameworks on Teaching & Learning

a. Affinities: Anarchism & Critical pedagogies. Relationship to Postmodernism and Poststructuralism-Postanarchism

b. Informal learning spaces

c. De-schooling

d. Anarchism & the role of the university

e. Pedagogical practices

Audience:

Anarchist Pedagogies will draw upon and make connection to contemporary anarchist studies literature, particularly in education. The book will be important for scholars in anarchist studies, critical pedagogy, as well as undergraduate students and activists who are interested in building philosophical, theoretical, historical and contemporary discussions and imaginations beyond traditional forms of education.

Timeframe:

1) Proposals due by July 20th, 2010

2) Proposal confirmations: August 20th, 2010

3) Chapter drafts due by October 1st, 2010

4) Editor

5) Review of drafts: November, 2010

Editor will produce a comprehensive introductory and single authored chapter in one of the three sections. The forward will be written by an activist/scholar. Final editing and approval of the formatted version will be submitted December 30th, 2010. Publishing date will be set for early fall, 2011.

Contributors:

Process for submitting proposals:

Interested scholars, researchers, educators, activists and others should send to the editor, by July 20th, 2010, the following:

1) Names, positions, mailing addresses, fax and phone numbers, and email addresses of authors;

2) Title of proposed chapter;

3) Description, of no more than 300 words, of chapter, including type of research, approach, context, connection to the book, and other pertinent information;

4) Biographies of authors of no more than 200 words;

Biography of editor:

Robert Haworth is an Associate Professor in Multicultural Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He currently serves as the director for the Research Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses surrounding diversity and education, globalization and neoliberalism. He has published multiple peer reviewed book chapters and presented internationally on anarchism and informal learning spaces, as well as critical social studies education. He co-founded Regeneration TV, along with other research collectives that are directly involved in contesting neoliberal policies at the university level. This is Robert Haworth’s first edited book.

Robert Haworth PhD—Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, haworth.robe@uwlax.edu, 608.385.0891

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Taiwan

Taiwan Journal of Sociology of Education

Vol. 9 No. 2, December 2009

Contents

Research Papers

The Model for the Transformation of Teacher Role: A Process with the Teacher Agency as a Pivot, Ding-Ying Guo (pp.1-36)

A Study on the Primary School Teachers Perception on Their Social Status and Professional Identity: A Case Study of Central Taiwan, Yen-Chao Huang, Fwu-Yuan Weng (pp.37-78)

Disentangle the Effects of Family Structure on Kids Dropping out of School: A Meta-Analytical Study, Simon Chang, Hung-Yu Lin (pp.79-113)

College Students’ Attitudes Toward LGBT Issues: An Investigation at a University of Education, Te-Sheng Chang, Tsai-Wei Wang (pp.115-150)

Taiwan Association for the Sociology of Education

Website: http://140.133.8.162/social/English/html/engindex.html

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Pink Curtain

Pink Curtain

BEYOND THE PINK CURTAIN?

 

Winter Colloquium: Beyond the Pink Curtain? Eastern European Sexualities, Homophobia and Western Eyes

22nd January 2010

Birkbeck Institute for Social Research

Sexualities, as aspects of identity and as part of the public language of nation, are a controversial feature of post-communist transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Radical political changes have led to the emergence of new social actors, such as the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) movement, the airing of new discourses about sexuality, as well as the eruption of new social conflicts and divisions.

This interdisciplinary Colloquium will  bring together scholars in the social sciences, history, Slavic and other area studies, as well as activists from LGBT communities, to examine the relationships between gender, nation and sexuality. How, for example, did the emergence of revised national identities after 1989 relate to new conceptions of non-normative gender and sexuality? What were the local dimensions of the ‘lesbian and gay question’, and why did they develop? How did queer sexualities in this region evolve historically? And what influence does that historical legacy have today? What are the specificities and particularities of Central and Eastern European sexual identities, within the region and compared with Western and other non-Western formations?

There will be a screening of the film “Beyond the Pink Curtain” (2009) and a discussion with Director Matthew Charles at 3pm on Thursday 21st January in the Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square.

Numbers are strictly limited, so please register early.

Cost, includes vegetarian lunch:  £25 Standard, £10 Birkbeck staff and all students.
Payment is by credit/debit card – Standard Booking Form   Birkbeck Staff & all Students
Friday 22nd  January 2010, Room 541, Birkbeck College Main Building, 9.30am – 5pm (Registration 9.30 in Room 538)

Film screening – Thursday 21st  January 2010  Registration for the free film screening – email Julia Eisner j.eisner@bbk.ac.uk

Detailed program and abstracts:
http://robertkulpa.com/index.php?/projects/BISR-Colloquium.html

Info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/news/pinkcurtain

Organiser: Robert Kulpa (roberto@kulpa.org.uk)

All the best,
Robert Kulpa
0044.785.999.5074
http://robertkulpa.com

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