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Homer

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

Venue: SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Date: Thursday 16th November 2011

From 9.30 am- 4pm (lunch included)

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

An Ethical Approach to Management and Governance in Higher Education Professor Peter Scott, Institute of Education, University of London +++++ ‘The presentation will consider the ethical dimensions of management and governance – including the ‘information’ challenges posed by league tables, freedom of information, student satisfaction scores and now the key information sets (KIS) thatall English higher education institutions will be obliged to provide following the White Paper, and the tensions between these external challenges and more traditional responsibilities towards collegiality and community. In particular the presentation will discuss the difficult transition from a regime based on ‘public’ values (and characterised by – relatively – low fees, rapid student growth and a commitment to widening access) to a regime grounded in ‘market’ values (and characterised by much higher fees, slower – or reverse – growth and much higher levels of competition) – and its implications for lifelong learning’

Interrogating participation: student experiences and pedagogical practices, Professor  Penny Jane Burke, Roehampton University +++++ This presentation will explore students’ experiences in relation to pedagogical practices to consider the ethical issues this raises for widening participation (WP). Key issues that will be explored include the ways different pedagogical practices and relations might be experienced as exclusive, the different pedagogical practices that HE teachers draw on in relation to WP, and the ways that pedagogies might (or might not) support the processes of being constituted as a legitimate student-subject in higher education. The presentation will draw on data from a qualitative project funded by the Higher Education Academy to explore these issues.

Curriculum, Employability and Knowledge: What makes a good degree? Annette Hayton,  Goldsmiths, University of London +++++ Developing employability skills in students is increasingly seen as an important aspect of higher education and, in order to help students to choose their degree course, Universities will have to provide information about the employment of their graduates. On the surface this can seem very rational but the job prospects of young people are not wholly defined by their qualifications or talents. A ‘useful’ vocational  degree often has less status and value in the market place than a traditional subject such as History taken at a prestigious university. This session will explore how the value placed on a degree is framed and shaped by existing cultural and economic inequalities.

Riots, Resistance and Rhetoric: the implications for higher education Professor Les Back, Goldsmiths, University of London +++++ The seeds of the current crisis in universities had a long gestation period, emerging from a sequence of transitions that have transformed the nature of higher education. It now appears to be morphing into the neo-liberal university of commerce where knowledge is valuable only if it has a marketable exchange value or the potential for policy relevance.  The contradictions inherent in this approach are brought into sharp focus when we consider the humanities. As a teacher I have been thinking about this a lot and wondering, ‘What is the promise of sociology for new graduates?’ Perhaps it is to provide ways of understanding what is before them and imagining ways to act in a society full of moral complexity. This approach might provide a way of understanding the urban unrest this summer and show that it is not unrelated to a schism in opportunities that is opening up amongst the young in the UK, including access to higher education.

Black and Minority Ethnic Students Negotiating White ‘norms’, Managing Exclusion: Ethical Challenges in Higher Education Professor Gill Crozier, Roehampton University +++++ According to some research Minority Ethnic students are proportionately over represented in the Higher Education sector. However, this broad statement masks which specific Minority Ethnic students these are and also which universities and which subjects they attend/study. In any case universities in Britain continue to be White and middle class dominated institutions.  In this paper I draw on some empirical research to look at the processes involved in negotiating White norms and values.  I will draw on Critical Race Theory, Critical Race Feminism and Bourdieu’s concept of symbolic violence to analyse the ethical imperatives that universities need to address in developing and transforming themselves into more egalitarian and equitable  places of learning.

Speakers Biographies

Peter Scott is Professor of Higher Education Studies at the Institute of Education University of London and also Chair of the Council of the University of Gloucestershire. At the end of last year he stood down as Vice-Chancellor of Kingston University after 13 years in post. Previously he was Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Education at the University of Leeds, and Editor of ‘The Times Higher Education Supplement’ from 1976 until 1992. He was a member of the board of the Higher Education Funding Council for England from 2000 until 2006, and Chair of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning from 2002 until 2009.

Penny Jane Burke is Professor of Education at Roehampton University, London, where she is Director of the Centre for Educational Research in Equalities, Policy and Pedagogy (CEREPP) and Founding Director of the London Paulo Freire Institute (LPFI). Dedicated to the development of methodological and pedagogical frameworks that support critical levels of understanding of equity and social justice in higher education, her current and recent research includes: ‘Formations of Higher Education Pedagogies’ (HEA-funded); ‘Transitions to Masters Level Study’ (HEA-funded); ‘Educational Access for All’ (EU-funded); ‘Men Returning to Study’ (ESRC-funded) and ‘Art for a Few: Exclusions and Misrecognitions in HE Admissions’ (NALN-funded). Penny is the Access and Widening Participation Network Leader for the SRHE. Her publications include Accessing Education effectively widening participation (Burke, 2002, Trentham Books) and Reconceptualising Lifelong Learning: Feminist Interventions (Burke and Jackson, 2007, Routledge), which was nominated for the 2008 Cyril O. Houle World Award for Outstanding Literature in Adult Education. Her book The Right to Higher Education: Beyond Widening Participation (Burke, Routledge) will be published in March 2012.

Annette Hayton is Head of Widening Participation at Goldsmiths, University of London and manages a range of activities designed to support successful progression to higher education. Before joining Goldsmiths she managed the London Region Post-Network at the Institute of Education and is currently convenor of the UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network.Annette is interested in how educational theory can be developed and applied in practice to promote positive change within the education system, aiming to  combine theory and practice in her work. She has produced two edited collection for Kogan Page Tackling Disaffection and Social Exclusion: Issues for Education Policy in 1999 and, with Anna Paczuska, Access, Participation and Higher Education in 2002.

Les Back is a Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London.His main fields of interest are the sociology of racism, popular culture and city life. His work attempts to create a sensuous or live sociology committed to searching for new modes of sociological writing and representation. This approach is outlined in his most recent book The Art of Listening (Berg 2007). He also writes journalism and has made documentary films. He is the coordinator of the ESRC funded Live Sociology programme which offers training in the use of multi-media in qualitative research as part of Researcher Development Initiative.  His books include: Auditory Cultures Reader with Michael Bull Berg (2003), Out of Witnesses with Vron Ware, University of Chicago (2002); The Changing Face of Football: Racism and Multiculture in the English Soccer, with Tim Crabbe and John Solomos (Berg 2001);New Ethnicities and Urban Culture: Racisms and Multiculture in Young Lives (University College Press, 1996);Race Politics and Social Change, with John Solomos (Routledge, 1995); His latest work onthe ethics of scholarship and teaching has been made available as a multi-media ebook entitled The Academic Diary (2011) http://www.academic-diary.co.uk/

Gill Crozier is Professor of Education in the School of Education, Roehampton University, London.  She is a sociologist of education and has researched and written extensively on ‘race’ and education and its intersection with social class and gender. Specific areas of her work include: issues relating to parents and schools, young people, and higher education. She is also concerned with education policy, and the socio-cultural influences upon identity formation and learner experiences.  Her ESRC funded studies include: The Socio-Cultural and Learning Experiences of Working Class Students in Higher Education;  Identities, Educational Choices and the White Urban Middle Classes project;  Parents, Children and the School Experience: Asian Families’ Perspectives. Her books include: Parents and Schools: Partners or Protagonists? (2000) Trentham Books; Widening Participation Through Improving Learning. (2009) (Edited by M. David) Routledge ; White Middle Class Identities and Urban Schooling (2011) with D.Reay & D.James. Palgrave

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.  SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

Interested in joining the AP Network-but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list.    Please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

PLEASE NOTE THAT SRHE HAS MOVED TO NEW OFFICES. OUR NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER

OUR NEW OFFICE DETAILS ARE:

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Higher Education Crisis

UNMAKING THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Chris Newfield author of the “Unmaking of the Public University” is speaking at Goldsmiths College, University of London, next Monday

Monday 7th March, 2011
5.00pm-7.00pm
Room 309, Richard Hoggart Builidng
Christopher Newfield “The Broken American Funding Model: Our Higher Education Problem, and Yours”

The talk will discuss the conventional wisdom about how American research universities are funded, and show that it is wrong. Although Americans disagree about whether the privatization of public universities is educationally and socially desirable, there is a general consensus that it is financially sound. This talk shows that privatization doesn’t make basic budgetary sense, and that one can argue against reduction of public funding on financial as well as educational and social grounds. It will also review recent U.S. activism and suggest ways in which a better higher education model might be starting to emerge.

Introduced and chaired by Les Back

Christopher Newfield teaches American Studies in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current research focuses on higher education history, funding, and policy, culture and innovation, and the relation between culture and economics. Recent articles have appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Academe, Le Monde Diplomatique, La Revue Internationale des Livres et des Idées, Radikal (Turkey), Social Text, Critical Inquiry, and South Atlantic Quarterly, and include “The Renewal of Student Movements, 2009-10,” “The View from 2020: How Universities Came Back,” “The End of the American Funding Model: What Comes Next? “Ending the Budget Wars: Funding the Humanities during a Crisis in Higher Education,” “Public Universities at Risk: 7 Damaging Myths,” “Science and Social Welfare,” “L’Université et la revanche des ‘Elites’ aux Etats-Unis,” “Why Public is Losing to Private in American Research,” and “Can American Studies Do Economics?” He is the author of The Emerson Effect: Individualism and Submission in America (University of Chicago Press, 1996), Ivy and Industry: Business and the Making of the American University, 1880-1980 (Duke University Press, 2003), and Unmaking the Public University: The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class (Harvard University Press, 2008), chairs the Innovation Group at the NSF Center for Nanotechnology in Society, runs a blog on the current crisis in higher education, Rethinking the University (http://utotherescue.blogspot.com), blogs at the Huffington Post, and is working on a book called Lower Education: What to do about our Downsized Future.

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Critical Hope

POINTS-BASED IMMIGRATION IN CONTEXT

Points-Based Immigration in Context: Research and Campaign Strategies

http://www.pbiscampaigning.org/

Conference 16th October 2010
10am-4pm
University of London Union
Malet Street
London WC1

This conference will present new research on issues related to the points-based immigration system (PBIS) as it affects Further and Higher Education. This is a system that unfairly restricts the ability of international students and staff to come to the UK, turns staff into immigration officials and treats international students as potential threats to national security.

The conference will assess:

a) The wider significance of immigration;

b) The full consequences of PBIS on the university;

c) The characteristics of new systems of regulation and surveillance in universities and colleges.

The conference aims to offer both expertise in research but also a focus for campaigners who object to the fundamentally discriminatory nature of the rules.

Speakers:

Les Back (Goldsmiths)

Tom Hickey (Brighton)

Georg Menz (Goldsmiths)

Liz Fekete (Institute of Race Relations)

Edgar Whitley (LSE)

Valerie Hartwich (Manifesto Club)

Joel Heyes (UKBA worker and PCS rep)

Susan Robertson (Bristol)

Andy Goffey (Middlesex)

Su-Anne Yeo (Goldsmiths)

Clare Solomon (ULU)

This event is free of charge. Please go to the ‘contact’ page to register: http://www.pbiscampaigning.org/contact

Supported by Universities and Colleges Union, University of London Union, Manifesto Club and the Centre for Cultural Studies, Department of Politics, Department of Media & Communications at Goldsmiths

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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