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Peter McLaren

WHAT DOES MARXIST-HUMANISM MEAN FOR TODAY?

Announcing an open forum in Chicago on…

What Does Marxist-Humanism Mean for Today?

Celebrating the Centenary of Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-1987)

As the global crisis of capitalism deepens, so too does the search for alternatives to it. This brings to life the contributions of Raya Dunayevskaya, an uncompromising critique of capitalism in both its “free market” and statist forms. Born in Ukraine in 1910, she was Leon Trotsky’s Russian-language secretary during his exile in Mexico. After breaking from him, she developed the analysis of the USSR as a “state-capitalist” society, published the first English translation of parts of Marx’s Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, and from the 1950s through the 1980s developed the philosophy of Marxist-Humanism in a number of path breaking works. Join us for a discussion of how her ideas speak to issues now being debated by feminists, critical race theorists, and many others searching for new pathways to liberation.

Convenor: Lauren Langman, Sociology, Loyola University

Chair: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, author, Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity

Speakers:

Peter McLaren, author, Life in Schools, University of California, Los Angeles

David Schweickart, author, After Capitalism, Loyola University

Sandra Rein, author, Reading Dunayevskaya: Engaging the Emergence of Marxist-Humanism, University of Alberta

Ba Karang, writer for Africa-Links, West Africa

Kevin Anderson, author, Marx at the Margins, University of California at Santa Barbara

Peter Hudis, co-editor, The Rosa Luxemburg Reader, Loyola University

Friday July 2
6:30 p.m.
Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson, Room 0211 (1 block north of Chicago Ave; ½ block east of State St.)

Sponsored by Loyola University Department of Sociology and the U.S. Marxist-Humanists

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Raya Dunayevskaya

Chinese Revolution

THE TRAGEDY OF THE CHINESE REVOLUTION

New from Haymarket Books:

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution
By Harold R. Isaacs

Introduction by Leon Trotsky

MOST ACCOUNTS OF the modern Chinese state begin with Mao’s 1949 Revolution; but to understand how the contest for power in one of the world’s most controversial nations began, it is necessary to look further back. In The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution, Isaac’s classic work of Marxist scholarship, the story of a promising struggle of workers and peasants for genuine self-government in 1925-27 is masterfully reclaimed. The defeat of their fight for socialism from below profoundly shaped the course of China’s development thereafter, in which the crude and illegitimate formulation of socialism from above became the order of the day. Originally published in 1938, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution makes an important contribution to discussions of the developing clash between China and other international powers, as well as to the country’s enigmatic internal conflicts.

HAROLD R. ISAACS was a Marxist historian who identified closely with Trotsky’s critique of the Soviet Union’s degeneration under the control of an authoritarian Stalinist bureaucracy.

ORDERING INFORMATION
Haymarket Books
Amazon
Indiebound

Desk/Exam copy requests: We are pleased to provide exam copies to University professors teaching related courses, for a flat rate of $5. Requests can be paid by check or credit card, and submitted on a university letterhead via the methods below.

Mail: Haymarket Books, P.O. Box 180165, Chicago, IL 60618
Email: info@haymarketbooks.org
Fax: 773-583-6144

Interview/Review copy requests:

If you are interested in reviewing The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution, please contact: Sarah Macaraeg at sarah@haymarketbooks.org.

The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution
By Harold R. Isaacs
March 2009
ISBN: 9781931859844
Paperback
$24.00
RELATED TITLES
History of The Russian Revolution
By Leon Trotsky

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Alternative Culture

CULTURAL LOGIC: AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF MARXIST THEORY AND PRACTICE

A NEW DOUBLE ISSUE

Dear colleagues and comrades:

I am pleased to announce that the new double-issue of ‘Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice’ is now available online at: http://clogic.eserver.org/

Below, please find the table of contents to each part of the double-issue.

Sincerely and in solidarity,

Joe Ramsey

Editor of the forthcoming 2010 Cultural Logic special issue on “Culture and Crisis” – jgramsey@gmail.com

Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice

New Double Issue 2008/2009

Issue 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Issue 2009: http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

***********************

Cultural Logic, ISSUE 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Articles

Stephen C. Ferguson II: “Contractarianism as Method: Rawls contra Mills”

Melissa Hull Geil: “Shakespeare and the Drama of Capital”

Nigel M. Greaves: “Intellectuals and the Historical Construction of Knowledge and Identity: A Reappraisal of Gramsci’s Ideas on Leadership”

Sven-Eric Holmström: “New Evidence Concerning the ‘Hotel Bristol’ Question in the First Moscow Trial of 1936”

Nicola Masciandaro: “Consciousness, Individuality, Mortality: Basic Thoughts about Work and the Animal/Human Boundary”

John H. McClendon III: “The African American Philosopher: The Missing Chapter in McCumber on McCarthyism”

J. C. Myers: “Traces of Utopia: Socialist Values and Soviet Urban Planning”

Garry Potter: “Humanism and Terror: Merleau-Ponty’s Marxism”

J. Jesse Ramirez: “Rage Against the Dying of the Light: Herbert Marcuse and the Politics of Death”

Jacek Tittenbrun: “Between Subjectivism and Individualism: A Critical Appraisal of the Austrian Case for Private Ownership”

Reviews

Lukas MacKenzie: Mark S. Blumberg, Basic Instinct: The Genesis of Behavior, and Michael Tomasello, Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition

Poetry

Bruno Gulli: “Hölderlin’s Window”

Howard Pflanzer: “The Endless War”

*********************** 

Cultural Logic, Issue 2009:
http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

Articles

Jeffrey Cabusao: “The Social Responsibility of Filipino Intellectuals in the Age of Globalization and Empire: An Interview with E. San Juan, Jr. and Delia D. Aguilar”

Alzo David-West: “The Literary Ideas of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il: An Introduction to North Korean Meta-Authorial Perspectives”

Barbara Foley: “Rhetoric and Silence in Barack Obama’s Dreams from My Father”

Grover Furr: “Evidence of Leon Trotsky’s Collaboration with Germany and Japan”

Bülent Gökay and Darrell Whitman: “Mapping the Faultlines: A Historical Perspective on the 2008-2009 World Economic Crisis”

Dave Hill: “Culturalist and Materialist Explanations of Class and “Race”: Critical Race Theory, Equivalence/Parallelist Theory, and Marxist Theory”

Michele Frucht Levy: “‘For We Are Neither One Thing Nor The Other’: Passing for Croat in Vedrana Rudan’s Night”

Gregory Meyerson: “Post-Marxism as Compromise Formation” (Foreword by E. San Juan, Jr.)

Michael Joseph Roberto: “Crisis, Revolution, and the Meaning of Progress: The Poverty of Philosophy and its Contemporary Relevance”

Spyros Sakellaropoulos and Panagiotis Sotiris: “Peter Gowan’s Theorization of the Forms and Contradictions of US Supremacy: A Critical Assessment”

E. San Juan, Jr.: “An African American Soldier in the Philippine Revolution: An Homage to David Fagen”

Daniel F. Vukovich: “Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989”

Reviews

Paul M. Heideman: Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism

David Schwartzman: Eileen Christ and H. Bruce Rinker, eds., Gaia in Turmoil: Climate Change, Biodepletion and Earth Ethics in an Age of Crisis

Poetry

Christopher Barnes: Selected Poems

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Strategies of Resistance

STRATEGIES OF RESISTANCE AND ‘WHO ARE THE TROTSKYISTS?’ – BY DANIEL BENSAID

A new book by Daniel Bensaid:

http://www.iire.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=186%3Astrategies-of-resistance-a-who-are-the-trotskyists&catid=18%3Anotebooks-for-study-and-research&lang=en

Strategies of Resistance & ‘Who Are the Trotskyists?’

IIRE/Socialist Resistance, Notebook for Study and Research no. 41/42 (182 pp.)

With shipping to: Europe €13,50 Rest of World €20,00 Pick up in Amsterdam €8,00

The IIRE has just published Strategies of Resistance & ‘Who Are the Trotskyists?’, a collection of works by IIRE Fellow Daniel Bensaïd, including his history of Trotskyism, newly translated into English by Nathan Rao. This 182-page book has been published in cooperation with Resistance Books. The introduction by Paul Le Blanc gives a flavour of the contents:

Daniel Bensaïd’s challenging survey comes at an appropriate moment. It is a gift to activists reaching for some historical perspective that may provide hints as to where we might go from here. Embracing and sharing the revolutionary socialist political tradition associated with Leon Trotsky, Bensaïd is not simply a thoughtful radical academic or perceptive left-wing intellectual – though he is certainly both – but also one of the foremost leaders of an impressive network of activists, many of them seasoned by innumerable struggles.

Daniel Bensaïd emerged decades ago as a leader of the French section of the Fourth International, the Ligue Communiste Révolutionnaire (LCR). Coming from the ‘generation of ‘68′ – the layer of young revolutionary activists of the 1960s – he blends an impressive intellectual sophistication with a refreshing inclination for revolutionary audacity, and with activist commitments which have not faded over the decades. In the tradition of Ernest Mandel, Bensaïd has reached for the continuing relevance of revolutionary Marxism not only in the battlegrounds of academe (as a professor of philosophy and author of such works as Marx for Our Times), but even more in the battlegrounds of social and political struggles against the oppressive and lethal realities of capitalist ‘globalization.’

In this particular work – succinct, crackling with insights and fruitful provocations – Bensaïd surveys the history of his own political tradition. We are not presented with a catechism, but with a set of informative and critical-minded reflections and notes. We don’t have to agree with all he says. I certainly question his taking issue with Trotsky over whether or not Lenin was essential for the triumph of the Russian Revolution (Trotsky says definitely yes, Bensaïd suggests maybe not). Nor am I satisfied when he gives more serious consideration to the dissident current in US Trotskyism of Max Shachtman and James Burnham (both of whom ended up supporting US imperialism in Vietnam) than to the tradition connected with James P. Cannon (which played a role in building a powerful movement that helped end the Vietnam war). On the other hand, Bensaïd makes no pretension of providing a rounded historical account of world Trotskyism, or even a scholarly account of the more limited issues that he does take up.

He emphasizes that ‘this essay is based on personal experience’ and is focused on what he views as ‘the major debates’ within the movement. And one is especially struck by the excellent point he makes in his Introduction regarding the necessity of understanding the varieties of Trotskyism around the world in their distinctive cultural and national specificities. Little sense can be made of Trotskyism if it is not related to the actual social movements and class struggles of various parts of the world, and to the left-wing labour sub-cultures, in which it has meaning.

The fact remains that Bensaïd offers us a thoughtful, stimulating, valuable political intervention which leaves the reader with a sense of Trotskyism’s history and ideas and diverse manifestations – and also a sense of their relevance for the struggles of today and tomorrow. For younger activists beginning to get their bearings, and for veterans of the struggle who are thinking through the questions of where we have been and where to go from here, this is an important contribution.

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