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Tag Archives: Labour process

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

FUEL FOR THE LIVING FIRE: LABOUR-POWER!

My article Fuel for the Living Fire: Labour-Power! is now available at Academia.

It can be viewed at: https://www.academia.edu/11923648/Fuel_for_the_Living_Fire_Labour-Power_

It is Chapter 7 in The Labour Debate: An Investigation into the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work, edited by Ana C. Dinerstein and Micheal Neary, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002, pp.179-202.

Glenn Rikowski

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Living Fire

Living Fire

Labour

Labour

THE POLITICS OF WORKER’S INQUIRY

New issue of ephemera on ‘The politics of worker’s inquiry’ released…

The Politics of Worker’s Inquiry
ephemera: theory & politics in organization
Volume 14, Number 3 (August 2014)
Edited by Joanna Figiel, Stevphen Shukaitis, and Abe Walker
http://www.ephemerajournal.org/issue/politics-workers-inquiry

This issue brings together a series of commentaries, interventions and projects centred on the theme of workers’ inquiry. Workers’ inquiry is a practice of knowledge production that seeks to understand the changing composition of labour and its potential for revolutionary social transformation. It is a practice of turning the tools of the social sciences into weapons of class struggle. It also seeks to map the continuing imposition of the class relation, not as a disinterested investigation, but rather to deepen and intensify social and political antagonisms.

Workers’ inquiry developed in a context marked by rapid industrialization, mass migration and the use of industrial sociology to discipline the working class. It was formulated within autonomist movements as a sort of parallel sociology based on a radical re-reading of Marx and Weber against the politics of the communist party and the unions. The process of inquiry took the contradictions of the labour process as a starting point and sought to draw out such political antagonisms into the formation of new radical subjectivities. With this issue we seek to rethink workers’ inquiry as a practice and perspective, in order to understand and catalyse emergent moments of political composition.

Including essays from Fabrizio Fasulo, Frederick H. Pitts, Christopher Wellbrook, Anna Curcio, Colectivo Situaciones, Evangelinidis Angelos, Lazaris Dimitris, Jennifer M. Murray, Michał Kozłowski, Bianca Elzenbaumer, Caterina Giuliani, Alan W. Moore, T.L. Cowan, Jasmine Rault, Jamie Woodcock, and Gigi Roggero; an interview with Jon McKenzie; and book reviews by Craig Willse, Stephen Parliament, Christian De Cock, Mathias Skrutkowski, and Orla McGarry.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Labour

Labour

LABOR PROCESS / VALORIZATION

40 years after Labor and Monopoly Capital, by Harry Braverman

Deadline for submission of articles: January 31, 2014
(Articles in Portuguese and English)

Guest Editor
Elcemir Paço Cunha
FederalUniversity of Juiz de Fora (UFJF)

“The distinctive capacity of human labor power is, therefore, not its ability to produce a surplus, but rather its intelligent and purposive character, which gives it infinite adaptability and which produces the social and cultural conditions for enlarging its own productivity, so that its surplus product may be continuously enlarged. From the point of view of the capitalist, this many-sided potentiality of humans in society is the basis upon which is built the enlargement of his capital” (BRAVERMAN, 1998, p. 38).

The purpose of this call is fostering discussions on the labor process in the capitalist mode of production, having in mind the 40th anniversary of the publication of Labor and Monopoly Capital: the degradation of work in the twentieth century, by Harry Braverman. As is generally known, this book resumed the discussions of Sociology of Work worldwide by evoking the links between the labor process and the monopoly phase of capital. From this copious influence, remained the so-called Labor Process Theory, which engenders discussions and events abroad (http://www.ilpc.org.uk/). The discussions from Braverman’s book, under the critical guidance of Micheal Burawoy, also, prompted considerations that, right or wrong, staked out the conditions for setting what came to be the Critical Management Studies (KNIGHTS and WILLMOTT, 1990).

Additionally, all movement in the different chains that put on hold the category work discussing its validity for a social criticism or its centrality to social life (Jürgen Habermas, Claus Offe, and Andre Gorz, and resonances in the recognition theory as it appears in Axel Honneth, in addition to authors having even postmodernist attitudes, such as Zygmunt Bauman), also served to greatly deviate research on the work problem (compare, notwithstanding, to different movements which do not claim such centrality under the terms of criticism, as György Lukács, Ernest Mandel, István Mészáros, etc.). Not by chance, the so-called Organizational Studies, which partly reflect on the issues of social and economic sciences, manifest the tendency to pass off the problems of the labor process as valorization process of capital by preferring other themes also important that, however, keep away from the key determinations of this sociability observed, whose guiding core is still (against the most varied prognoses) the logic of value.

Therefore, celebrating this work by Braverman means opening the possibility for discussions which bring up the issues directly associated to work and labor process in the capitalist production, addressing, by way of example, these possible points:

· Issues concerning the centrality of work;
· New expressions of work degradation;
· Work, work division, and command technique (administration) at work;
· Work, State, and social policies;
· Work and new expressions of the “social question”;
· Work and feminism;
· Others.

We would like to invite authors to prepare theoretical and empirical papers.
Cadernos EBAPE.BR is an online journal on Administration published in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, by EBAPE/FGV (BrazilianSchool of Public and Business Administration of Getulio Vargas Foundation) and it is an open access journal – http://bibliotecadigital.fgv.br/ojs/index.php/cadernosebape/index. All approved papers will be published in the original language. The Cadernos EBAPE.BR is classified by the CAPES Qualis system as B1.

The authors should follow the guidelines for submitting articles to Cadernos EBAPE.BR in:  http://bibliotecadigital.fgv.br/ojs/index.php/cadernosebape/pages/view/normas.

The articles should be submitted through the link: http://bibliotecadigital.fgv.br/ojs/index.php/cadernosebape/login  

You must register as an author, if you have not done it previously.

The deadline for article submission is January 31, 2014.

Note: please indicate in the field “AUTHOR’S COMMENTS” (bottom of the page – 1st stage of the procedure) that your article is for the special issue: “Labor process/appreciation 40 years after Labor and Monopoly Capital, by Harry Braverman”.

Specific questions about the special issue should be directly addressed to the guest editor: Elcemir Paço Cunha (elcemirpacocunha@gmail.com).

Guest Editor
Elcemir Paço Cunha
Associate Professor of the Post-Graduation Programs in Social Service and Law at the Universidade Federal de Juiz de For a

 

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 ‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/  

Work

Work

THE POLITICS OF WORKERS’ INQUIRY CONFERENCE

May 2-3, 2013 @ University of Essex

http://ephemeraweb.org/conference/index.htm

Workers’ inquiry is an approach to and practice of knowledge production that seeks to understand the changing composition of labor and its potential for revolutionary social transformation. It is the practice of turning the tools of the social sciences into weapons of class struggle. Workers’ inquiry seeks to map the continuing imposition of the class relation, not as a disinterested investigation, but rather to deepen and intensify social and political antagonisms.

This conference brings together various aspects of workers’ inquiry, from its historical origins and development to contemporary mutations and adaptations of it within contemporary struggles. It will expand the terrain and form of workers’ inquiry, focusing on topics including inquiries into cultural labor and the service economy, geographies of class conflict, transformation in value production, and the limits to workers’ inquiry as a political/research method.

Presentations from:
Anna Curcio (University of Messina) 
Bianca Elzebaumer & Caterina Giuliani (Cantiere per pratiche non-affermative) 
Heidi Hasbrouck (Goldsmiths) 
Tolga Hepdincler (Bahcesehir University)
Funda Kaya (Bahcesehir University)
Asli Kayhan (Kocaeli University)
Michał Kozłowski, Janek Sowa, Kuba Szreder (Free/Slow University of Warsaw)
Alan W. Moore (ABC No Rio / Squatting Europe)
Frederick H. Pitts (University of Bath)
Kasparas Pocius (Lithuanian Culture Research Institute)
Gigi Roggero (University of Bologna)
M. Nedim Süalp (Marmara University)
Zeynep Tul Akbal Sualp (Bahcesehir University)
Jamie Woodcock (Goldsmiths)

For more information and to register send a message to conference@ephemeraweb.org.

Sponsored by ephemera and the Essex Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 17th SEPTEMBER 2012

EVENTS

Imagining Canada’s Future: SSHRC holding regional panels

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council is hosting a series of regional panels across Canada to discuss how the social sciences and humanities research community can contribute to Canada’s future.

For more information: http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/society-societe/community-communite/Imagining_Canadas_Future-Imaginer_l_avenir_du_Canada-eng.aspx

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STRIKE BACK! DisOrientation 2012 at York University

September 19 at 10:00am until September 29 at 2:00am

DisOrientation is a radically different, politically progressive week of events that will offer all students and community members access, critical thought and insight into the exciting and political social justice spheres that exist within and beyond York U.

-WORKSHOPS
-DIRECT ACTION
-FILM SCREENINGS
-PANELS
-AND MUCH MORE!

***** ALL EVENTS FREE, WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE and CHILDCARE AVAILABLE! *****

Please email us at opirg@yorku.ca for all accessibility and childcare needs!

For more info: http://www.facebook.com/events/112853958862501/

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2013 International Labour Process Conference

On March 18-20, SMLR will host the International Labour Process (ILPC) Conference in New Brunswick, NJ.

Keynote speakers are:

– Andrew Ross, New YorkUniversity professor of social and cultural analysis

– Ruth Milkman, Professor of Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and Academic Director of the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education at School of Professional Studies (SPS).

The primary focus of the International Labour Process (ILPC) Conference is work and employment relations in the context of the broader political economy, with an emphasis on employee perspectives and theory-led empirical research.

Call For Papers

To apply, please prepare an abstract of 500-700 words and follow the submission instructions on the official International Labour Process Conference Web site, http://www.ilpc.org.uk.

For more info: http://smlr.rutgers.edu/2013-ILPC

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Call for Proposals: Labor Studies Journal Special Session – Labor Confronting Austerity

UALE invites proposals on topics across the entire span of the challenges facing working people. Proposals may draw from all disciplines and take many forms, including strategic or academic reports; qualitative or quantitative analyses; teaching demonstrations; labor history research, curriculum for adults or K-12; union membership training tools; case studies; workshops; general curriculum design; strategy sessions and performances, music, art, including public art, and theater. We are interested in what workers are saying and doing as they assert such fundamental rights as the right to
bargain collectively, enjoy union representation, obtain education, and remain safe at work. We are also interested in how modern labor education helps working people assert these rights despite economic struggle, systematic inequality and challenging political climates.

For more information: http://uale.org/conference/conference-2013#Call

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NEWS & VIEWS

Wisconsin Judge Strikes Down Sections of Walker’s Act 10 as Unconstitutional

A Wisconsin judge has struck down as unconstitutional sections of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s controversial collective bargaining law, Act 10, at least as applied to municipal and school district employees, who are the majority of public workers in the state. Act 10 prompted months of protests after it was introduced in 2011, and inspired a hard-fought recall effort that Walker survived in June of this year.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/09/15

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Activist Communique: This is not an Occupy eulogy

by Krystalline Kraus, rabble,ca

This is not a one year Occupy anniversary piece.

This is not a reflective obituary of a short-lived movement as if I were writing about a young life tragically cut short.

This is not a eulogy. 

Nor is this some cliché French statement: “Occupy is dead! Long live Occupy!”

It’s complicated…

Read more: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/krystalline-kraus/2012/09/activist-communique-not-occupy-eulogy

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Labor Is Under Attack All Over the World

by David Macaray, Common Dreams

There are plenty of notable labor events occurring at the moment. And by “notable,” of course, we mean hideous and horribly depressing. Clearly, management people all over the world believe the stars are in perfect alignment and that they now have a tremendous advantage when it comes to negotiating with their workforce. Naturally, they’re looking to exploit that advantage.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/09/13

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Arlene Mantle 1939-2012

She lit her candle in the wind. It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of singer-songwriter and social activist Arlene Mantle (Sage), on September 10, 2012.

The trademark headband, overalls, buttons, acoustic guitar, Joplin voice and razor wit and insight will be instantly recognizable to anyone fighting for justice in the ‘80’s and 90’s in Ontario, in Canada and around the world.

A woman, a feminist, poor, lesbian, a single mother, Arlene forged her own path. She was not the same, she was a painted bird. She chose to use her magnificent talents to speak up for the causes of workers, women, immigrants and refugees, the injured, the ill, the oppressed everywhere. She sang for peace and justice and against class and race discrimination. She would stride to her stage and speak to us and for us. She would raise our spirits when we struggled. She would help us see with her insight. She would weave our words into a mighty statement and a powerful song. She changed our lives with her songs and her courage to sing them. She stood for overcoming personal adversity and standing up to greed. She leaves to us a vast collection of songs, many written in collaboration with grass roots groups. Songs of resistance, struggle and fight-back.

Our thoughts and love go to her sons, daughters, and grandchildren, who journeyed with her through all the ups and downs, and who shared her with us.

Arlene was a life-force. She will be deeply missed. Please share the news of her passing with everyone who has fought with her for change. Planning for a memorial concert is underway; details will follow.

Sing with us now. You know the tune. “One woman pushing won’t make the mountain move, two women pushing won’t make the mountain move, all women pushing will make the mountain move. Let’s move mountains together.”
Contact: sage@lynnmantle.com

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com  

 

 

Dead Man Working

Dead Man Working

DEAD MAN WORKING

NEW TITLE FROM ZerO Books

Dead Man Working

By Carl Cederstrom and Peter Fleming

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Capitalism has become strange. Ironically, while the ‘age of work’ seems to have come to an end, working has assumed a total presence – a ‘worker’s society’ in the worst sense of the term – where everyone finds themselves obsessed with it. So what does the worker tell us today? ‘I feel drained, empty – dead’; This book tells the story of the dead man working. It follows this figure through the daily tedium of the office, to the humiliating mandatory team building exercise, to awkward encounters with the funky boss who pretends to hate capitalism and tells you to be authentic. In this society, the experience of work is not of dying…but neither of living. It is one of a living death. And yet, the dead man working is nevertheless compelled to wear the exterior signs of life, to throw a pretty smile, feign enthusiasm and make a half-baked joke. When the corporation has colonized life itself, even our dreams, the question of escape becomes ever more pressing, ever more desperate.

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‘Cederstrom and Fleming, like a present day Virgil, bravely venture into an underworld full of shades whose entire lives have been put to work, who throw themselves heart and soul into the job, and who are constantly implored by management gurus to ‘be themselves,’ ‘feel free,’ and ‘have fun’ in the office. This fascinating and dark little book is an excellent and disturbing introduction to what increasingly large realms of the world of work have become’ – Michael Hardt, Co-author of Empire, Multitude, and Commonwealth.

‘What has work done to us? Cederstrom and Fleming’s brilliant dark and witty book tells us the truth. Working in our sleep? Dressing up as infants? Deprivation tank addiction? Fitness centrers? Suicide? Email? If you didn’t already know what work has made you become then this book might have a devastating effect on your life. Read it!’ – Simon Critchley, Hans Jonas Professor, New School for Social Research.

‘Dead Man Working’ at Zero Books: http://www.zero-books.net/books/dead-man-working

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Work

Work

MSc IN LABOUR, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT

MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development

SOAS, University of London

This new programme is concerned with labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the Global South.

 It is the first MSc programme of its kind in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. Students will have the opportunity to experience policy-making and labour campaigns in practice. They will participate in our interactive sessions to devise policies; and design and implement regional, national and international labour campaigns.

The MSc draws on the expertise of staff in the Department of Development Studies, specialising in Latin America, Africa and Asia. It benefits from our contacts within the field, including with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc degree will focus on:

  • Labour process and organisations in the South
  • A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such asChina,Korea,India,South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East
  • The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South 
  • Informalisation of labour, casualisation and precarious work
  • Feminisation of labour
  • Forced labour and child labour 
  • Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones
  • Household and reproductive labour
  • The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning
  • Theories and practices of local, national and international labour campaigns

For further information please visit the following link: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Cognitive Capitalism

COGNITIVE CAPITALISM, EDUCATION AND DIGITAL LABOR – MICHAEL PETERS & ERGIN BULUT

Michael A. Peters & Ergin Bulut (eds.)
Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor 
Year of Publication: 2011 
Peter Lang Publishing Group
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien,
2011. XLII, 341 pp.
ISBN 978-1-4331-0981-2 pb. 

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=54297&concordeid=310981

Contents

Antonio Negri: Foreword 

Michael A. Peters & Ergin Bulut: Introduction 

Timothy Brennan: Intellectual Labor 

George Caffentzis: A Critique of Cognitive Capitalism

Silvia Federici: On Affective Labor 

Christian Fuchs: Cognitive Capitalism or Informational Capitalism? The Role of Class in the Information Economy 

Jonathan Beller: Cognitive Capitalist Pedagogy and Its Discontents 

Ergin Bulut: Creative Economy: Seeds of Social Collaboration or Capital’s Hunt for General Intellect and Imagination? 

Mark Coté / Jennifer Pybus: Learning to Immaterial Labour 2.0: Facebook and Social Networks 

Emma Dowling: Pedagogies of Cognitive Capitalism – Challenging the Critical Subject 

Alex Means: Creativity as an Educational Problematic within the Biopolitical Economy

Toby Miller: For Fun, For Profit, For Empire: The University and Electronic Games 

Michael A. Peters: Algorithmic Capitalism and Educational Futures 

Alberto Toscano: The Limits of Autonomy: Cognitive Capitalism and University Struggles 

Nick Dyer-Witheford: In the Ruined Laboratory of Futuristic Accumulation: Immaterial Labour and the University Crisis 

Tahir Wood: The Confinement of Academic Freedom and Critical Thinking in a Changing Corporate World: South African Universities 

Cameron McCarthy: Afterword. The Unmaking of Education in the Age of Globalization, Neoliberalism and Information

About the author(s)/editor(s)

Michael A. Peters is Professor of Education at the University of Waikato (New Zealand) and Emeritus Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the executive editor of Educational Philosophy and Theory and editor of two international e-journals, Policy Futures in Education and E-Learning. His interests are in education, philosophy and social policy and he has written over fifty books, including Creativity and the Global Knowledge Economy (Lang, 2009) (with Simon Marginson and Peter Murphy).

Ergin Bulut is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is interested in political economy of labor and its intersection with education, communication and culture. 

Reviews

“Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ provides us with a series of very thoughtful and provocative analyses of the relationship among political economy, education and new forms of knowledge and labor. It is definitely worth reading and then discussing its implications at length.” (Michael W. Apple, John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison)

“This volume is a ‘tour de force’. Through its chapters, a new space is opened for understanding education in the contemporary world. With an magisterial introduction by its indefatigable editor, Michael A. Peters, and his colleague Ergin Bulut, ‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ implicitly shows the limitations of postmodernism and offers a large conceptual framework that will surely be mined and critically examined for some years to come.” (Ronald Barnett, Emeritus Professor of Higher Education, Institute of Education, London)

“‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ is extraordinarily instructive in studying the living bestiary of capitalism, a provocative text that enervates capitalism through helping us cultivate our critical faculties creatively and exultantly in the service of its demise. An important advance in our understanding the production of subjectivity in capitalist societies.” (Peter McLaren, School of Critical Studies in Education, Faculty of Education, University of Auckland)

“This valuable, lithe volume explores the ever-evolving, mutating forms of capitalism. It is a work of craft, intelligence and provocation. It reflects on some of the most important subterranean trends in contemporary societies. These unite the material and the immaterial, biology and power, economics and education. The contributors parse the intersections of intellectual and physical labour, paid and unpaid work, labour and pedagogy, research and gaming, free information and multi-national corporations, autonomy and liberalism, accumulation and enclosure, class and creativity. They do so with verve, steel and tenacious insight.” (Peter Murphy, Professor of Creative Arts and Social Aesthetics, James Cook University)

“If you read just a single book in the field of educational theory this year, make sure it’s this one. Drawing on the rich tradition of Marxist autonomism, the contributors pinpoint what the transmutation of labor and opening of new domains of class struggle under cognitive capitalism mean for education. The editors have assembled an impressive team, all accomplished scholars adept at envisioning changes in the sites and forms of knowledge-making, acquisition and contestation. For anyone interested in the educational implications of technologically-driven shifts in capitalism’s socio-economic structures, this is the volume to buy. Brimming with insight, balanced and lively – it will attract attention from scholars and students well beyond the confines of education faculties.” (James Reveley, Associate Professor, Faculty of Commerce, University of Wollongong)

“We have now for some time been undergoing intense technological and social revolutions that transformed the nature of labor, education and the capitalist economy. Peters and Bulut and their collaborators in ‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ chart out the changes in the new economy and social life and explore its consequences for education. All educators and those concerned with transformations of contemporary culture and society should be concerned with these issues and learn from this book.” (Douglas Kellner, UCLA; Author of ‘Guys and Guns Amok’ and ‘Media Spectacle and the Crisis of Democracy’)

“The mainstream discourse of the knowledge economy is empty. The digital-Taylorist routinisation of much of the work that was once the preserve of knowledge workers and the offshoring of knowledge jobs to countries where skilled labour is much cheaper have given the game away. But it would be wrong to assume that the electronic/IT revolution has not changed our lives and our labour when it clearly has. This outstanding collection raises fundamental questions about knowledge, the role of education and labour in the digital world. It brings current debates to a new level and should be read by students, academics and policy makers across the globe.” (Hugh Lauder, Professor of Education and Political Economy, University of Bath)

“’Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ presents a new theory of capitalism and digital labor. It is a very valuable resource and will spark an industry of debate and elaboration. This book presents such a wealth of diverse material that any reader will find something new and challenging, and each chapter in this collection makes a welcome contribution to the growing literature in the field.” (George Lazaroiu, Principal Research Fellow, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, New York)

“Cognitive capitalism is a crucial category for conceptualizing the workings of contemporary globalization. Using the theories of the Italian Autonomist Marxist tradition, or ‘operaismo’, Peters and Bulut along with the other authors in this collection present important, fascinating insights into capitalism, education and labor today. It should be read immediately by anyone concerned about how the daily practices of education prepare the multitude for the travails of their immaterial and material labor.” (Timothy W. Luke, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University)

“Peters and Bulut have provided us with a brilliant set of papers that take us to the heart of the political economy. Under ‘cognitive capitalism’ subjectivity is both the realm of freedom and the source of value, raising the stakes in control (governmentality). Hence the continuing fecundity of interpretations at the intersection of Marx/Foucault/Deleuze. We experience both larger productive community and heightened public surveillance, together with unsolvable tensions in education and research. But this book also reminds us that the circuits of cognitive capitalism continue to rest on a mountain of physical commodities, generated largely in the emerging economies and subject to more traditional (and more traditionally Marxist) forms of manufacture, energy consumption and hyper-exploitation of labour.” (Simon Marginson, Centre for the Study of Higher Education, University of Melbourne, Australia)

“Education cannot be understood outside of the diverse national and global forces in which it is situated, including the increasing separation of power from local politics. This book brings together a number of first-rate theorists in making clear the relationship among knowledge, power and digital labor. The book is a tour de force for anyone interested in the new registers of power that are now shaping education on a global level. This is an important book and should be put on the class list of every educator who views education central to politics.” (Henry A. Giroux, Global Television Network Chair Professor, English and Cultural Studies Department, McMaster University)

“The exceptional contributions assembled for this timely volume carefully anatomize – and critically question – the category of cognitive capitalism and its composition. This book is a major resource for a generation of academic workers with a very real stake in developments, conflicts and debates surrounding the edu-factory.” (Greig de Peuter, Co-author of  ‘Games of Empire’).

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Work Less, Sleep More

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR PROCESS CONFERENCE 2012 – STOCKHOLM

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS: INTERNATIONAL LABOUR PROCESS CONFERENCE, STOCKHOLM, 27-29 MARCH 2012

The 2012 International Labour Process will take place at the Universityof Stockholm. The deadline for submissions of proposals for abstracts and symposia is 31st October 2011. Details of the conference and how to submit abstracts through the conference website can be found here (http://www.ilpc.org.uk/).

The website now contains full details of the special streams that will supplement the general conference. These consist of:

-S1: Lean in ideology and practice: from labour process and societal effects perspectives
-S2: Putting labour in its place: The Global Commodity Chain, the Global Value Chain, the Global Production Network and Labour Process Analysis
-S3: Work or nature? The Effects of Climate Change on the Labour Process and the Responses of the Labour Movement in the Global South and the Global North
-S4: Global capitalism, national institutions and the comparative political economy of work and employment relations

We look forward to seeing you in Stockholm,

The Conference Organisers
Fredrik Movitz, Åke Sandberg, Lotta Stern (Department of Sociology, University of Stockholm)
Paul Thompson
Convenor ILPC Steering Group

Thanks, Paul
Paul Thompson
Professor of Organisational Analysis
Department of Human Resource Management
Vice Dean (Research), Strathclyde Business School
University of Strathclyde
W: www.hrm.strath.ac.uk

https://nemo.strath.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.hrm.strath.ac.uk/

T: +44(0)141 548 3284  

F: +44(0)141 552 3581

E: p.thompson@strath.ac.uk<mailto:p.thompson@strath.ac.uk>

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Uprising

THE COMMUNE – ISSUE 21

The Commune, March 2011

Issue 21 of The Commune is now available. It features reports on local anti-cuts committees, discussion of the next steps for the movement in Egypt, Sheila Cohen on the implosion of the National Shop Stewards’ Network, and much more…

And the best thing is, you can read the PDF free online, click here

Risk of infection: class struggle in China. London public forum, LARC, 7pm on Thursday 7th April

In mid-2010 a strike wave rolled through China’s factories, the most widespread and militant expression of China’s internal migrant workers so far. Their struggle shook the Chinese regime and provoked a world-wide debate about the end of the low-wage-model that stands behind China’s rise to the “factory of the world” and provides Europe and other regions with cheap consumer products.

We will look at the social conditions that stand behind the militant outbreak – the situation and struggles of different groups of migrant workers, such as construction, factory, domestic and sex workers, before examining the strike wave and its implications and discussing the formation of a new working class movement in China.

The discussion will also focus on new forms of reference, exchange and support that take into account the current phase of crisis and the increasing number of social struggles in different parts of the world.

The presentation will be held by someone who has lived in China and worked on publications on China’s migrant workers, including “Dagongmei – Women workers From China’s World Market-Factories Tell Their Story” and “The Take-off of the Second Generation – Migrant Work, Gender and Class Composition in China” (see:www.gongchao.org).

All welcome.

From 7pm on Thursday 7th April at London Action Resource Centre, 62 Fieldgate Street, London, E1 1ES

From reform to rebellion in Bolivia: Monday 18th April

Jeffery Webber has written a new book on Bolivia and the interaction between the social movements from below 2000-2005 and the post-2006 Evo Morales government. He was interviewed in the new issue of The Commune and next month he will be addressing a public meeting on the topic.

All welcome.

From 7pm on Monday 18th April at the Lucas Arms, near King’s Cross on Gray’s Inn Road.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski

LABOUR, CAPITALISM AND RADICAL CRITIQUE

Dr. Peter Thomas (Brunel University – Historical Materialism) gives a lecture in University of Tampere (Finland) 28 January 2011 (at 14-16, Linna Building K110, Kalevantie 5)

Themes:

Labour-Power (Arbeitskraft)

Die Organisationsfrage as regulative idea?

Wellcome!

Information: Mikko Lahtinen, kevattuuli@kopteri.net

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Some of my online articles on Labour Power:

Rikowski, G. (1990) The Recruitment Process and Labour Power, unpublished manuscript, Division of Humanities & Modern Languages, Epping Forest College, Loughton, Essex, July. Online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Recruitment%20and%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (1996) Apprenticeship and the Use-value Aspect of Labour Power, First Paper prepared for the ESRC Seminar Series on ‘Apprenticeship in Work and Education’, Nene Research Centre, Nene College of Higher Education, Northampton, 31st May, at The Flow of Ideas web site: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Apprenticeship%20and%20the%20Use-value%20Aspect%20of%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (2000) That Other Great Class of Commodities: Repositioning Marxist Educational Theory, BERA Conference Paper, Cardiff University, 7-10 September. Available from Education-line: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00001624.htm

McLaren, P. & Rikowski, G. (2001) Pedagogy for Revolution against Education for Capital: An E-Dialogue on Education in Capitalism Today, Cultural Logic: An Electronic Journal of Marxist Theory and Practice, Vol.4 No.1: http://clogic.eserver.org/4-1/mclaren%26rikowski.html

Rikowski, G. (2005) Distillation: Education in Karl Marx’s Social Universe, Lunchtime Seminar, School of Education, University of East London, Barking Campus, 14th February: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Distillation

Rikowski, G. (2006) Education and the Politics of Human Resistance, Information for Social Change, Issue No.23 (Summer): http://libr.org/isc/issues/ISC23/B3%20Glenn%20Rikowski.pdf

Global Economy

THE POLITICS OF LABOUR AND DEVELOPMENT

The Global Labour University is pleased to announce a call for papers for the 2011 conference on “The Politics of Labour and Development” to be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from September 28 to 30, 2011.

The global economic crisis has had a particularly hard-hitting impact on working people, their families and communities throughout the world. What is more, they also face an environmental crisis that is closely linked to the economic crisis. Together, these crises have intensified the dispossession of the commons (including both local resources and public goods such as health and education), the informalisation of labour, unemployment, national and global social inequality, and the “slummification” of cities.  Declining biodiversity, climate change and pollution are evidence of the impact of the crisis on the planet itself. Environmental degradation threatens viable livelihoods and endangers public health. Meanwhile the market imperatives get defining power over daily life, business interests tighten their stranglehold on the state logic and power is transferred to supranational institutions with limited democratic accountability, simultaneously narrowing electoral choices, and increasingly restrictions on protest.

Labour, as a key social force of the excluded majority, has a crucial role to play in countering the destructive logics of capitalism.  The politics of labour is about altering the balance of power away from capital and unelected bureaucracies toward labour and broader society.  The politics of labour is also about overcoming the multiple relations of power and oppression, including the economic, political, gender, ethnic and cultural, that contributes to and reproduce the power of the few and the subordination of the many. This has the
following dimensions:

1)      The workplace imperative: Labour’s attempts to reverse the declining wage share and extract as much of the social surplus created through mobilisation for higher wages and better working conditions, as can be seen in the recent strike wave in South Africa and other parts of the world. This is especially important as rising inequality has devastating effects on society, as more and more people are pushed to margins of production and consumption patterns.  For example, this includes issues of the distribution of productivity growth, minimum wages and basic income grants as well as policy issues of taxation and redistribution.

2)      New forms of power or leverage: With rising unemployment and increasing numbers of workers pushed into precarious forms of work, traditional sources of power are eroded, but new forms of power are being explored, often by the most marginalized and sectors traditionally ignored by labour movements.  Labour’s links to other social forces is crucial here.  This also raises questions about who constitutes the working class, with wider understandings of labour increasingly finding salience in innovative movements around the world.  The development of transnational linkages and networks is also an important dimension to the development of new forms of power and leverage.

3)      The policy imperative: Labour’s attempts, often in alliance with other groups in civil society, to pressure governments to  increase the social wage (public health, education, transport, housing, etc.), increase employment and change economic (and slowly environmental) policy accordingly.  For example, what would a “green new deal” look like? We also encourage papers that look at the conversion of industrial production into alternative forms of production and consumption as well as papers looking at ecological issues.

What are the most effective ways to develop pro-working class policy? Corporatism seems to have spread, rather than declined, in the neo-liberal era: what is its balance sheet?

4)      Political parties, alliances and trade union organizations, and political power: Labour’s attempts to directly alter the balance of state power, either

a.      through alliances with ruling political parties,

b.      through the reorganization of trade union organizations and strategies,

c.      through the development of alternative organizations and alliances with other movements in civil society, or

d.      through building movements that refuse to participate in the state, but are willing to pressure it for reforms.

This raises questions about the role of labour—as a reforming force, as a legitimating function that hinders more radical challenges to state power, or as a central actor in building an alternative to the destructive logic of capitalist development.  The nature of political alliances and forms of mobilizing are vital issues that are being experimented on in various regions of the world (e.g., many movements in Latin America, South Korean marginalized workers, etc.). It also raises questions about international approaches to global governance.

5)      The economic imperative. Within the neoliberal framework, competitiveness becomes more aggressive and self-destructing through currency manipulation, quantitative easing, wage dumping, trade barriers, devaluation etc. Is there space for economic policy nationally and internationally that avoids the disadvantages of a competitive race to the bottom or a retreat in isolated economic nationalism?

6)      Alternative forms of production, consumption and redistribution: This raises questions about what are alternative forms of production and consumption.  For example, worker cooperatives, microcredit / microfinance projects (including its problems for informal sector workers), local agricultural production, and solidarity economy alternatives have emerged around the world.

We welcome submissions for papers on any of these themes.  While we  encourage submission of papers that broadly fit into the themes, we will also consider papers that do not fit directly into one of the themes as long as they address the broad focus of the conference. The GLU encourages policy orientated research and therefore welcomes submissions that not only analyses the problem, but also offer some policy initiatives and solutions for debate.

Please send a one page abstract (which includes your methodological approach) by January 30, 2011 to Pulane Ditlhake at Glu.SouthAfrica@wits.ac.za  and Michelle Williams at michelle.williams@wits.ac.za

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com