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Capitalist Work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th NOVEMBER 2011

 

EVENTS

PORTRAIT OF RESISTANCE: THE ART & ACTIVISM OF CAROLE CONDE & KARL BEVERIDGE

Monday November 21
6pm – 7:30pm
Room 7-162, 7th Floor, OISE
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto

As young married artists in the 1970s, Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge faced a dilemma — they were in competition with each other. Instead of breaking them apart their conflict politicized them — sparking a pioneering collaboration that continues today.

Portrait of Resistance witnesses Condé & Beveridge in action as they create provocative staged photographs about the environment, the rights of workers and the current global financial crisis. An intimate view of subjects who shun celebrity, Portrait of Resistance is about two artists who challenge the way we see our world.

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SOLIDARITY TUESDAY AT OCCUPY TORONTO

Tuesday November 22: University Sector Workers and Discussion on Social Movements and the Law
8:00 pm
St. James Park (King & Adelaide), North West corner

Every Tuesday at 8pm the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) holds an open meeting at the Occupation Toronto Base Camp at St. James Park (East Church and Adelaide). The purpose of these meetings is to build solidarity between the occupy movement and workers in struggle. Please spread the word and join us. This Tuesday November 22 at 8pm the GTWA has sent the invite out to University Sector Workers to visit Occupy Toronto. Let’s make the connection between the struggle for decent jobs and services and the occupy movement. Given that the site is under threat of eviction the second half of the meeting will be a discussion on social movements and the law and how we can defend the occupy movement.

Look for us the North West corner of the park (close to Adelaide near the bathrooms). Dress for the weather.

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PUBLIC SERVICES, GOOD JOBS, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES – A COMMUNITY FORUM

November 23, 2011
7:00pm – 10:00pm
Ralph Norton Community Centre
765 Queen Street East, 2nd Floor
Toronto

Rob Ford’s slash and burn agenda is all about privatizing and reducing public services, eliminating good jobs, and undermining communities. Come to an important community meeting to hear how these attacks will affect us in the East End, and how we can oppose the Ford Agenda.

Speakers include:

– Maureen O’Reilly, President of the Toronto Library Workers, CUPE 4948
– Effie Vlachoyannacos, Chair of Federation of Metro Tenants Associations
– Mark Ferguson, President of CUPE 416, City of Toronto outside workers

For more information: eastendersps@gmail.com

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SISTERING’S SPUN STUDIO SALE, TORONTO

November 23
5-8pm
Sistering
962 Bloor St. West, Toronto

Please come out and support this upcoming sale at Sistering’s Spun Studio.
All money will go directly back to the women artisans who participate in this program.

Sistering has been supporting homeless, underhoused and low-income women in the Toronto community since 1981.  For more information about Sistering follow this link: http://www.sistering.org/about/

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TACKLING HEALTH INEQUITIES: LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LEADING HEALTH REGION

A Wellesley Institute Forum on Health Equity, Toronto

November 23, 2011
1:30- 4:30 p.m.
Medical Sciences Building, Room MS 3154
University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle

With special guest Dr. Cory Neudorf and a panel of local health leaders

Dr. Cory Neudorf, Chief Medical Health Officer for Saskatoon Health Region, will be making a special lecture and leading a discussion on addressing health inequities at a local community level.

Saskatoon has led the way in Canada in sophisticated research that identifies the nature and foundations of systemic health inequities between neighbourhoods in the city; developing comprehensive multi-pronged strategies to tackle those inequities; and driving these strategies into action through focussed programs engaging with local communities and building effective cross-sectoral collaborations.

For more information: http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com

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NEWS & VIEWS

BRITISH TORIES RECOGNIZE P3 FAILURE (BUT NOT THE SOLUTION)

After repeated British reports revealing failure of public private partnerships (P3s) for public infrastructure projects, the British Chancellor has announced a fundamental review of the government’s use of P3s (or, as the Brits call them, PFIs).

Read more: http://bit.ly/u5bTLE

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COMMUNITY ORGANIZING IN RADICAL TIMES: AN INTERVIEW WITH AMY SONNIE AND JAMES TRACY

By Matt Dineen, http://TowardFreedom.com

When we think back to the mass social movements of the 1960s who are the participants that come to mind? Most histories of that tumultuous period leave out an important segment of organizers that were committed to building multiracial alliances towards social justice.

“In the United States,” Amy Sonnie and James Tracy explain in their new book Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels, and Black Power: Community Organizing in Radical Times (Melville House: 2011), “it’s hard to imagine a broad Left movement that includes white poor and working class people as radical change agents.” Their book seeks to bring to light this untold piece of the 1960s and the stories of those involved.

Read more: http://bit.ly/sos3ok

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AS OCCUPY MOVEMENT REGROUPS, WHAT CAN UNIONS LEARN?

By Mischa Gaus, Labor Notes

As tens of thousands celebrated the two-month anniversary of the Occupy phenomenon, why has Occupy’s message, so similar to what labor has said and done, resounded more forcefully?

Read more:
http://labornotes.org/2011/11/occupy-wall-street-regroups-union-allies-mobilize

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RESISTING EXPROPRIATION OF THE OCCUPY MOVEMENT

By Matthew Brett, The Bullet

The occupy movement is currently being forcefully dismantled by police across North America and Europe. The pretext for these police interventions are health and safety concerns, but the reality is that public space is being re-occupied by the status quo. This is a status quo that would rather see public spaces pacified and vacant. This is a status quo prepared to use police violence to expropriate those most in need of the community that the occupy movement provides. These expropriations also reaffirm the fact that challenges to the prevailing order are generally met with brute force. There is a pressing need to assist and participate with those still entrenched in the occupations, and there is an equally pressing need to discuss where to go from here.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/571.php

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(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

END

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – A new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Work

CRITICAL LABOUR STUDIES – 8th SYMPOSIUM 2012

Venue: The Universityof Salford, Greater Manchester, UK

Saturday 18th Sunday 19th February 2012

Call for Papers and Sessions

It is clear to researchers and activists, both in the trade union movement and universities, that global capitalism is increasingly shaping the worlds of work and employment. The imposition of this neo-liberal orthodoxy has many profound implications, not least that states seek to both de-legitimise workers’ opposition and marginalise their organisations. However, just as capitalism has embraced neo-liberal strategies, there has emerged a new politics of resistance that is varied and diverse, embracing: trade union and socialist organisations, green and ecological protest movements, anti-war activists, feminists, human rights campaigners and NGOs.  It is against this background that the Critical Labour Studies (CLS) symposium has aimed to bring together researchers and activists to discuss key features of work and employment from a radical and labour-focused perspective. We recognise that while left academic researchers participate in the usual round of mainstream conferences the scope for focused radical debate around these themes is actually quite limited. 

Through CLS we have developed an open working group and discussion forum that engages with many of the challenges facing researchers and trade unionists within the current environment of work and employment. By ‘labour’, we anticipate, in the traditions of radical researchers over the ages, a broad understanding of social, economic and political agendas. To date, themes have included: race, identity and organising migrant workers, global unionism and organising internationally, the new ‘politics of production’, privatisation, outsourcing and offshoring, restructuring and alternative/inclusive research methodologies.  The list of themes and questions that concern us continues to develop over time, and the intention will be to reflect this evolving agenda at this year’s symposium. An ancillary objective is to engage in genuinely critical debate, rescuing this term from its co-option by mainstream agendas.

Building on the successes of the past six years, the forthcoming symposium will be structured as a series of plenary sessions. Each will be organised around a particular theme with speakers and discussants, followed by a broad discussion. It has been an important principle of CLS that the conference is not based on the convention of academic conferences with specific papers being presented in separate streams. Rather our intention has been to deepen discussion and debate, and to bring together researchers and labour/ union movement activists (where possible) in joint sessions.  All sessions are genuinely open and inclusive and involve a broad range of participants, from established academics to early-career researchers, and from established trade union officials to shop-floor representatives and grass-roots activists. The distinctive organising principles of CLS are, therefore, to assist unions and workers in dealing with the challenges faced in the neo-liberal world of work and employment. Ultimately, discussion of strategies and tactics are related to the broader aim of creating a socialist society.

Send proposals for presentations/sessions/papers to Dr Phoebe V Moore Carter: p.moore@salford.ac.uk

Deadline 16th September 2011

Join the Critical Labour Studies Email List: If you would like to be added to the CLS email list, please contact Jane Holgate at: j.holgate@londonmet.ac.uk 

Check out our website at: http://criticallabourstudies.org.uk/site/ 

This event is supported by Historical Materialism, Capital and Class, and the BUIRA Marxist Study Group.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Digitisation Perspectives

EPHEMERA – VOLUME 10 NUMBERS 3 – 4

The Digital Labour Group in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario and /ephemera: theory and politics in organization/ are pleased to announce the arrival of Volume 10: 3-4:

*** Digital Labour: Workers, Authors, Citizens ***

Edited by Jonathan Burston, Nick Dyer-Witheford and Alison Hearn

ephemera: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/

Born out of the conference of the same name held in the fall of 2009 at the University of Western Ontario, this special double issue of / ephemera / addresses the implications of digital labour as they are emerging in practice, politics, policy, culture, and theoretical enquiry. As workers, as authors, and as citizens, we are increasingly summoned and disciplined by new digital technologies that define the workplace and produce ever more complex regimes of surveillance and control. At the same time, new possibilities for agency and new spaces for collectivity are borne from these multiplying digital innovations.

This volume explores this social dialectic, with a specific focus on new forms of labour. Papers examine the histories and theories of digital capitalism, foundational assumptions in debates about digital labour, issues of intellectual property and copyright, material changes in the digital workplace, transnational perspectives on digital labour, the issue of free labour and new definitions of work, and struggles and contests on the scene of digital production.

Contributors include Brian Holmes, Andrea Fumagalli and Cristina Morini, David Hesmondhalgh, Ursula Huws, Barry King, Jack Bratich, Enda Brophy and many others.

This issue also contains vital contributions from union and guild activists hailing from the Canadian Media Guild (CMG), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the American  Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), the University of Western Ontario Faculty Association and the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

The Digital Labour Group: Jonathan Burston, Edward Comor, James Compton, Nick Dyer-Witheford, Alison Hearn, Ajit Pyati, Sandra Smeltzer, Matt Stahl, Samuel E. Trosow.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

A World To Win

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

International Conference
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee
Álvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domènech (CEDIF)

Conference Languages
Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program

The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Álvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Doménech.

During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Professor Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Contact information:

Instituto de História Contemporânea/ Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Av. de Berna, 26 C, 1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal. E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

No Future

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCHING WORK AND LEARNING

Special Conference Announcement
International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL)

The Seventh RWL Conference will be taking place in Shanghai, China (December 4-7, 2011)

All conference information can be found at http://www.rwlecnu.org/

Deadline for proposals (papers, symposia, workshops, poster sessions) is March 1st, 2011.

Conference Streams include:
a) Learning, Organizational Change and Organizational Development
b) Professional Work and Learning
c) Leadership Studies in Work and Learning
d) Labour Studies in Work and Learning
e) Trade Unions’ Education and Learning
f) Quality of Work/Learning Life
g) Trans-nationalism, Migration, Work and Learning
h) Work, Learning and Community
i) Learning Theory, Skills and Work
j) Identity, Work and Learning
k) Gender, Ethnicity, Spirituality, Diversity in Workplace and Learning
l) Vocational Education, Labour Markets and Learning
m) Policy Studies, Work and Learning
n) Unpaid Work and Learning
o) Historical Approaches to Work, Learning and Social Change
p) Best practice studies, work and learning

About the RWL Series:
The RWL international conference series was established in 1999 and has run continuously since on a bi-annual basis. Successful conferences have been held in the UK, Canada, Finland, Australia, South Africa, Denmark. In close association with the Journal of Workplace Learning and Emerald Publishing, the RWL series is the longest, continuously running international conference series in the field of work and learning studies currently in operation.

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Miles Straum

RACE, RADICALISM, AND REPRESSION ON THE PACIFIC COAST AND BEYOND

A Major Conference at the University of Washington, Seattle

May 12-14, 2011

Call for Proposals

From the Industrial Workers of the World and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union to the Black Panthers and the Third World Liberation Front strikes, radical movements embracing and demanding racial justice have figured prominently in the history of the “left coast” of the United States. They have also generated violent responses, including state repression, that reverberated across the United States and around the world.

The Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest and the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies at the University of Washington invite panel and paper proposals on any aspect of race, radicalism, and repression within or somehow related to the Pacific Coast of North America, including linkages to peoples, ideas, and movements across the oceans and continents. We are especially interested in proposals that seek to reorient the study of race and politics in U.S. and world history.

In addition to the conference, the University of Washington Press will publish a collection of essays selected and revised from the conference presentations. George Lipsitz of the University of California, Santa Barbara, will deliver the keynote address.

All proposals must include a title and an abstract of each presentation (no more than 300 words) and a brief CV of each presenter (no more than two pages). Panel proposals must also include a title and a description of the session (no more than 250 words). Please submit all materials as email attachments (Microsoft Word or pdf) to cspn@uw.edu by September 30, 2010.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski