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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 25th JULY 2010

EVENTS

SEND US YOUR RESEARCH REQUESTS! / ENVOYEZ NOUS VOS REQUÊTES DE RECHERCHE !

The Community-University Research Exchange (CURE), a joint initiative of the Concordia and McGill Quebec Public Research Groups (QPIRG), seeks to connect university students and community groups through research collaborations for social and environmental justice.

Through our database, students complete research projects for grassroots community groups working towards environmental and social justice. Examples of projects possibilities are:

* a report * a research paper * video or photo production * graphic design * business planning * program design communication plans * annotated bibliography * journalistic writing * pamphlets * translation * curriculum design * policy reports * grant applications * feasibility studies * surveys and more

You can look at examples of current and finished projects on our website, http://www.qpirgconcordia.org/cure

To submit a research request for our database, please submit the CURE Research Request Form which you can access through our website. If you need assistance in completing the form, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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COMMUNITY FORUM: AUDISM AND THE TORONTO POLICE SERVICE

August 7
6:00pm – 8:00pm
OISE/UofT, Room 2212, Second Floor
252 Bloor Street West (St. George subway station)
Toronto

We have all heard the stories of the Toronto Police Services denying interpreters, accusing Deaf people of “faking”, interpreting attempts to communicate as violence, misunderstanding facial expressions that are a part of our grammar as anger, and countless other acts of audism, discrimination, and violence. It is time to do something about it!

Join us in sharing our stories and coming together as a …united community of Deaf, oral deaf, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and hearing allies! We will share our experiences in a public forum to promote healing, equality and change. This will be the beginning of a long process of achieving change within the Toronto Police Services policy, training, and sensitivity to our diverse communities.

ASL interpretation provided. If you require accommodations or childcare, please contact Jenny Blaser at jb.signsofsupport@gmail.com as soon as possible.

Endorsed by the LEAF’s Youth Commission, Signs of Support, Ryerson Student Union, OPIRG, and the Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students

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CALL FOR QUERIES: THE PEOPLE’S FOOD MOVEMENT

Deadline: July 29, 2010

Community food security and what’s often called food sovereignty are drawing together diverse groups – from rural folks and farmers to urbanites, environmentalists and those involved in public health and social justice. It has created powerful new alliances that are being replicated globally.

In this issue of Alternatives, we will investigate the people’s food movement, both domestically and globally. We want examples of what is working and what isn’t, and what these examples tell us of the challenges that lie ahead. What will a secure and resilient food system taste like? What can be done to keep the food movement a people’s movement? How will the special things about food make food movements different from other social, environmental and public health movements? How will food organizers link to people with other causes? And what is the food movement anyway?

If you can say something big, new and powerful in a small number of plain words, we want to hear from you. Details are at our website: http://alternativesjournal.ca/food2011

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ON PRIVILEGE AND PROTEST – ANOTHER CATALYTIC CONVERSATION

July 26
4:00pm – 5:30pm
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West
7th floor in Peace Lounge
Toronto

Reflecting on what happened in our city around the G8/G20 and continues to happen, difficult questions need to be asked:

– Who was surprised by the police violence when every day in our world people are subjected to this kind of brutality?
– What makes us think that the same kind of brutality exacted on Aboriginal communities and other so called minority communities would never be turned on mainstream communities, i.e. those with unjust privilege?
– Who is ‘us’?

In order to prepare for this conversation we invite you to review Chapter 3 from Starhawk’s Truth or Dare – Fierce Love: Resisting the Weapons the Culture Has Devised against the Self.

Sponsored by The Catalyst Centre

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CATCH 22 HARPER CONSERVATIVES – 1ST TORONTO AREA MEETING

July 28
7:00pm – 8:30pm
Lower level meeting room
31 Wellesley Street East
Toronto

Had enough of the Harper Conservatives and their wrecking ball? Ready to help defeat them in the next federal election? Join us for our first Toronto-area campaign meeting.

The Catch 22 Harper Conservatives campaign is a nationwide, grassroots effort to help send the PM packing. We launched our website in March. The campaign’s name comes from the 22 days that Parliament was prorogued last winter. There need to be consequences at the ballot box for Harper’s disdainful attitude and attacks on democratic values and institutions.

Catch 22 is independent of the political parties. Everyone who shares our goal is welcome to participate. Our strategy is to work in 30 to 40 winnable Conservative-held ridings across the country.

As long as Canada continues to use the antiquated first past the post voting system, strategic voting campaigns like Catch 22 are necessary in order to lessen the impact of vote splitting. The opposition is unprepared and unlikely to take measures that will ensure the defeat of Harper’s weakest team members. After all, their strategies are also based on vote splitting. That leaves it up to the voters to figure out how to rid Canada of PM Harper. Catch 22 is trying to fill that gap.

More info: http://catch22campaign.ca/

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NEWS & VIEWS

FIGHTING AUSTERITY? THE PUBLIC SECTOR AND THE COMMON FRONT IN QUEBEC

by David Mandel, The Bullet

The 2005 round of negotiations in Quebec between the provincial Liberal government and the public sector unions was ended abruptly by the adoption of a special law that unilaterally imposed wages and conditions on the workers…The special decree (Bill 142/Law C-43) was quite a remarkable attack on public sector collective bargaining, even by the standards of the Quebec state… In May 2009, the CSN (Confédération des syndicats nationaux – Confederation of National Trade Unions), the FTQ (Fédération des travailleurs et travailleuses du Québec – Federation of Workers of Quebec, affiliated with the CLC) and the SISP (Secrétariat intersyndical des services publics – Inter-union Secretariat of Public Services) announced a ‘Common Front’ (Front commun) of provincial public-sector workers (recalling in name the illegal general strikes of Quebec workers in 1972).

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/396.php

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BEHIND THE HEADLINES: THE WORKPLACE KILLS 14 PER DAY—ONE BY ONE

by Tom O’Connor, Labor Notes

Month after month, year after year, workers die in trench collapses and falls from roofs. OSHA cites the employer, slaps it with a modest fine (a median penalty of only $3,675 per death in 2007), and points out that simple methods exist to prevent such tragic loss of life. Yet some employers continue to ignore the hazards and workers continue to lose their lives due to this criminal neglect.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2010/06/behind-headlines-workplace-kills-14-day-one-one

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FEW AWARE OF LABOUR RIGHTS IN TORONTO’S CHINATOWN
Exploitation typical in other immigrant communities, labour activists say

by Nicholas Keung, Toronto Star

Sue Zheng was happy to land her first job in Toronto at a manicure salon. But there was a catch: she had to pay a $400 deposit to work there, and receive only $25 a day for 10 hours of work, seven days a week.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9u7MuD

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NGOS RISK ALL IN STANDOFF WITH HARPER OVER CIVIL SOCIETY CRACKDOWN

by Alice Klein, rabble.ca

You have to admire the political logic. If there is no data to research, there will be no facts to account for. How perfect the Tories’ ditching of the mandatory long-form census data collection is for themselves — and how dangerous for the rest of us.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/07/ngos-risk-all-standoff-harper-over-civil-society-crackdown

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WANT TO BE POOR? WORK ONE OF THESE 8 JOBS

by Josie Raymond, change.org

Post-recession job creation is coming, the experts say. Unfortunately, many of these jobs will pay less than $10 an hour. Yeah, it’s an honest day’s work, but if it’s not enough to live on, much less raise a family and maintain a home, what’s the point?

Read more: http://uspoverty.change.org/blog/view/want_to_be_poor_work_one_of_these_8_jobs

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CPP SURVIVED GLOBAL CRASH BETTER THAN MOST PLANS

(NUPGE – National Union of Public and General Employees)

The reserve fund of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) was one of the top international performers during the 2005-09 boom-and-bust period, according to a report by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

By comparison, Canada’s private pensions, as is the case in most western developed countries, still have not recovered from huge losses during the global recession, the OECD reports in an analysis of public and private programs in 13 countries.

Read more: http://nupge.ca/content/3399/cpp-survived-global-crash-better-most-plans

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH: WORKING CONTINUOUSLY TOWARDS CHANGE
Thomas Abel
International Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 4
http://www.springerlink.com/content/n86756k7330p7555/

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DEBATING AGGREGATE DEMAND AND AGGREGATE SUPPLY: INTRODUCTION
Fred Moseley
Review of Radical Political Economics published 14 July 2010
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0486613410377461v1

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EVOLUTION OF NONPROFIT SELF-REGULATION IN EUROPE
Angela L. Bies
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 14 July 2010
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010371852v1

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THE PRACTICE OF DIALOGUE IN CRITICAL PEDAGOGY
Jodi Jan Kaufmann
Adult Education Quarterly published 14 July 2010
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713610363021v1

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JOB POSTINGS

FULL-TIME EDITOR, INFORMATION WARFARE MONITOR

The Information Warfare Monitor (a collaboration between the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and the SecDev Group) seeks applications for a full-time editor of the Information Warfare Monitor. The position comes as a paid full-time fellowship at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

The Information Warfare Monitor is an advanced research activity tracking the emergence of cyberspace as a strategic domain. We are an independent research effort. Our mission is to build and broaden the evidence base available to scholars, policy makers, and others.

More info: http://www.infowar-monitor.net/2010/07/call-for-applicants-information-warfare-monitor-full-time-editor/

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THE STOP COMMUNITY FOOD CENTRE: CATERING SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR

The Stop’s catering services are a new social enterprise initiative of our fundraising department, with all net proceeds supporting our anti-hunger, community-building programs. We are seeking a dynamic, experienced, resourceful coordinator to drive catering sales, liaise with clients, and assist in the execution of events.

Reporting to the Director of Development, and working as part of the fundraising team, the Catering Coordinator will:

– Develop new business and ensure retention of current clients
– Develop and execute marketing strategies to increase catering sales
– Initiate and execute strategies to ensure The Stop’s a preferred caterer at key venues
– Develop marketing collateral including catering brochures, website, etc.
– Liaise with our chef and other staff to coordinate catering functions including booking, selecting and costing menu items, pricing, coordinating staff and equipment rentals
– Attend events to ensure client expectations are met or exceeded
– Prepare thorough and professional proposals
– Attend industry events as required

More info: http://thestop.org/jobs

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VOLUNTEER & FUNDRAISING COORDINATOR, NORTH YORK WOMEN’S SHELTER, TORONTO

Deadline: August 6, 2010

North York Women’s Shelter is an emergency shelter and support service provider to abused women and their children.

You will be joining our Development team and will be responsible for fostering and growing our volunteer base through recruitment and recognition. You will also support our fundraising efforts, particularly around donor relations and donor management. In particular, manage our database and tax receipting, processing donations, as well as donor stewardship. This position also has some cross functional duties with front-line and support staff. This position is unionized with OPSEU Local 518.

For more information: http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Job/389908-298

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Global Economy

MIGRANT WORKERS’ RIGHTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

ESRC Seminar

Thursday September 2nd 2010 International Slavery Museum, Liverpool, UK

This one-day seminar, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, is the second in the Middlesex University series examining emerging issues of global labour regulation. The seminar will be held at the International Slavery Museum (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/) in Liverpool’s dockside on Thursday September 2nd 2010 from 10am until 5.30pm.

Migration is an integral part of an increasingly internationalised economy. Around 3 per cent of the world’s population, just less than 200 million people, now live and work outside of their own country. This number has been growing at just less than 3 per cent in each year. The increased tendency for people to migrate to work and live has been spurred by changes in the world economy and the effects of structural economic change, or through war and civil upheaval, or environmental damage. Trade liberalisation and market de-regulation has also increased the propensity to migrate, as new geographical patterns of production have emerged. Yet labour migration is not a central concern of international agencies such as the WTO, the IMF or the World Bank. Migrant workers and their families are vulnerable to exploitation and racism, and labour market imbalances can result from migration in both sending and receiving countries.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine migration from a rights –based perspective. We hope to explore aspects of civil, human and social rights of migrant workers as well as labour and economic rights. Migrant labour is thus viewed from within perspectives of forced, slave and child labour as well as economic labour. As such the seminar welcome the participation of those academics, practitioners and migrant worker activists who wish to develop new agendas for regulating migrant labour through a variety of agency and policy initiatives.  

The seminar will be divided into two sessions. The first, thematic session, will examine alternative perspectives on migrant workers’ rights. The second session will present case studies from different world regions. Speakers/Participants will include: 

Marion Hellmann (Assistant General Secretary, Building and Wood Workers International, Geneva) – overview of migrant workers in the world economy

Professor Joshua Castellino (Law Department, Middlesex University) – A Rights Based Approach to Migration

Svetlana Boincean (International Union of Food, Farm and Hotel Workers ) -on eliminating Child Labour in agriculture and tobacco growing 

Heather Connolly and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Manchester University)- Welfare Systems, Social Inclusion and Migrant Worker-Union Relations in the EU

Steve Craig (UCATT building workers’ union, UK) –  Vulnerable Work and Migration in the UK construction industry

Nick McGeehan (director of Mafiwasta www.mafiwasta.com , an organisation for migrant workers in the Gulf).

And case study representations from migrant worker activists in Ireland, the Gulf Region, Italy, and India.

If you are interested in participating in the seminar please register your interest with Denise Arden at d.arden@mdx.ac.uk. Lunch and refreshments are provided and the seminar is free to attend, but registration in advance is necessary. More information can be obtained from the seminar organisers, Professor Martin Upchurch (m.upchurch@mdx.ac.uk) and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Miguel.MartinezLucio@mbs.ac.uk).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

THE NEW SPECTRE HAUNTING EUROPE: THE ECJ, TRADE UNION RIGHTS AND THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT

From the Institute of Employment Rights

The New Spectre Haunting Europe: The ECJ, Trade Union Rights and the British Government

A FREE conference, in association with SERTUC

Saturday 28th November 2009, 10:00am – 3:30pm, at the TUC Congress House, London

Please distribute this message to colleagues, activists, networks and members. The weblink where you can find out more and book places is here: http://www.ier.org.uk/node/408  

The New Spectre Haunting Europe: The ECJ, Trade Union Rights and the British Government

A free conference, Saturday 28th November 2009, 10:00am- 3:30pm, in the Main Hall, TUC Congress House

Organised by The Institute of Employment Rights in association with SERTUC

To book your free place, please book at office@ier.org.uk

This conference, organised around the 2nd anniversary of the initial ECJ decisions, aims to bring workers together with sympathetic academics and lawyers to share information, learn from each others’ experiences and plan for a better future.

So how should unions and their members respond? What are the political, legal and industrial options open to unions and their members? Unions are pushing politically for changes to EU and UK laws. Lawyers are looking at ways to challenge the direction of the ECJ through the ILO and the European Court of Human Rights. But can workers wait? Examples of workers ignoring restrictive laws and fighting back in defence of pay and jobs are already spreading – and winning.

Speakers include:- John Hendy QC; John Monks, ETUC; Sarah Veale, TUC; Prof Keith Ewing; Bob Crow, RMT; Barry Camfield, ODA; Steve Cottingham, O H Parsons; Richard Arthur, Thompsons Solicitors; Brian Caton, POA; Billy Hayes, CWU

Full programme here: http://www.ier.org.uk/node/408  

Phelim MacCafferty
Projects and Events Officer
Institute of Employment Rights
179 Preston Road
Brighton East Sussex
BN1 6AG
t: 01273 330819
e: phelim@ier.org.uk
http://www.ier.org.uk

This year is IER’s 20th anniversary. We are proud of what we have achieved but recognise more needs to be done. Show your continued support by taking a subscription and joining our debate. Go to http://www.ier.org.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois

RACE, LABOR AND CITIZENSHIP IN THE POST-EMANCIPATION SOUTH

 

Call for Papers
 
Conference on ‘Race, Labor & Citizenship in the Post-Emancipation South’
Charleston, March 11-13, 2010
College of Charleston
Charleston, South Carolina
 
Keynote by Steven Hahn, author of the prize-winning A Nation Under Our Feet:
Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration

Rationale: One hundred years ago the outstanding African American scholar-activist, W. E. B. Du Bois, presented to the American Historical Association a paper entitled “Reconstruction and Its Benefits.” In the paper and in his seminal Black Reconstruction, published a quarter century later, Du Bois not only exposed the racial assumptions underpinning the then dominant view of the period following slave emancipation: he insisted that the struggles over slavery and the shape of the freedom that followed were central to the history of America’s working people, calling it “the kernel and meaning of the labor movement in the United States.” Over the past generation, historians have built upon Du Bois’s powerful insight about the connections between race, labor and citizenship in the post-emancipation South, producing some of the most compelling scholarship in the field of U. S. history.
 
The After Slavery Project, a transatlantic research collaboration based at Queen’s University Belfast, welcomes proposals from scholars at all levels for individual papers and panels that showcase new and developing research on these and related themes across the former slave South, between the end of the Civil War and the early years of the twentieth century. As part of our commitment to making this scholarship widely available to teachers and students outside of higher education, labor and community activists, and interested citizens, we invite proposals for teachers’ workshops and panels that attempt to link new scholarship and public/popular history and/or online learning.  
 
Suggested topics include:
Labor and the Politics of Reconstruction
Freedwomen, Citizenship and the Public Sphere
Freedom, Property Rights and the Land Question in the Postwar South
Black Workers, the Union Leagues and the Republican Party
White Supremacy and the Prospects for Interracialism
The Franchise and Grassroots Political Activism
Coercion, Paramilitary Violence and Resistance
Emigration Movements and Black Mobility
Gender and the Free Labor Vision
Religion and Southern Laborers
Dockworkers, Port Cities and Black Mobilization
Race Leadership after ‘Redemption’
Populism and the Color Line
Agricultural and Urban Labor
Race, Labor and New South Industrialization
Independent Politics after 1880
 
Details are available online at http://www.afterslavery.com . Proposals (limit 200 words/paper) should be submitted by November 20, 2009 either electronically to charlestonconference@afterslavery.com or by completing the online form at the After Slavery http://www.afterslavery.com  website.
 
Conference Organizers:
Brian Kelly, Queen’s University Belfast
Susan E. O’Donovan, University of Memphis
Bruce E. Baker, Royal Holloway–University of London
Bernard E. Powers Jr., College of Charleston
Simon K. Lewis, College of Charleston (CLAW)
Kerry Taylor, The Citadel
 
Organized by the After Slavery Project
Co-sponsored by the Program in the Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World (CLAW); the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture (College of Charleston); the (SC) African American Historical Alliance; School of Humanities and Social Sciences (The Citadel) and the Southern Labor Studies Association

Other supporting organizations: Center for the Study of the American South (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill); Institute for Southern Studies (University of South Carolina at Columbia); Labor and Working Class History Association (LAWCHA); Charleston International Longshoremen’s Association Local 1422; The Citadel Oral History Program; W. E. B. Du Bois Institute (Harvard University)
 
The After Slavery Project is funded by the (UK) Arts and Humanities Research Council

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF WORK AND EDUCATION – UPDATE 6th JULY 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people.

We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

• NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
• REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET
• JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE
• ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING
• COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE
• ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
• A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
• ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
By Aziz Choudry, Jill Hanley, Steve Jordan, Eric Shragge & Martha Stiegman

Displacement of people, migration, immigration and the demand for labour are connected to the fundamental restructuring of capitalism and to the reduction of working-class power through legislation to free the market from “state interference.” The result is that a large number of immigrant and temporary foreign workers face relentless competition and little in the way of protection in the labour market. Globally and in Canada, immigrant workers are not passive in the face of these conditions: they survive and fight back. This book documents their struggles and analyzes those struggles within the context of neoliberal globalization and international and national labour markets. Fight Back grew out of collaboration between a group of university-affiliated researchers/activists and the Immigrant Workers Centre in Montreal. The book shares with us the experiences of immigrant workers in a variety of workplaces.

It is based on the belief that the best kind of research comes from people’s lived experiences and consequently tells it “how it really is”.

Available at your local independent bookstore or order online from
http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca

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REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET

Low-skill jobs are not “no skill” jobs, and the labor market for non-college jobs—jobs that do not require a college degree— is vast and diverse. This brief uses data from the 2007 Survey of Employers in the Low-Skill Labor Market to explore differences between non-college jobs that have few if any requirements and those for which either a high school degree, prior experience, or previous skills training is extremely important.

The report aims to broaden and deepen our understanding of the diversity of this labor market.

To read more: http://www.urban.org/publications/411801.html

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JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE

Community-Campus Partnerships for Health is pleased to announce the second call in our 2009-2010 Educational Conference Call Series. In the midst of the numerous recovery act funding announcements from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), we’ve been noticing a dramatic rise in inquiries to CCPH from community-based organizations that are either applying directly for research grants or as partners of academic institutions that are the lead applicants. We’ve decided to focus the call series on answering the most frequently asked questions, as part of the over-arching theme of “Building Community Capacity for Research.” Each call includes speakers who provide answers and insights from their direct experience, helpful handouts, and links to relevant resources.

The audiofile, agenda, and handouts for the first call, which took place on June 3 and addressed the “how and why” of obtaining a federally negotiated indirect rate and federal wide assurance, are now posted on the CCPH website at:
http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/pastpresentations.html

The next call, scheduled for July 15 from 3:30 – 5 pm eastern time, addresses the question of what organizational systems and supports need to be in place to do community-based participatory research (CBPR) in a community agency setting. The call is titled “Setting Up & Running a CBPR Department in a Community Agency: The Access Alliance Experience.”

To register for the call, go to: https://catalysttools.washington.edu/webq/survey/ccphuw/78916.

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ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING

The rising dollar. An aging workforce. Competition from overseas. These are just a few of the challenges facing Canadian businesses. Increasingly, companies are investing in skills training as a way of gaining a much-needed edge—and Canada’s textile industry has been on the forefront of this shift, spending millions of dollars on an innovative—and inventive—workplace learning initiative.

To read more: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/PracticallySpeaking/20090616MWTextiles.htm?Language=EN

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COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE

One of the highlights of the Canadian Co-operative Association’s National Congress in Ottawa was the launch of A Century of Co-operation, a commemorative book by Canada’s pre-eminent co-op historian, Ian MacPherson. The 234-page book chronicles the history of Canada’s co-operative movement through text and images from the movement’s beginnings to the present day.

The book can be ordered from CCA’s website at: http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/about_cca/100th/Commemorative-book . Cost is $50 plus GST.

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ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
By Sam Gindin

Of all 20th century industries, it was the auto sector that best captured the sway of capitalism and the rise of American dominance. The assembly line showed off capitalism’s remarkable productive potential and the automobile flaunted capitalism’s consumerist possibilities … In the growth years after the war, the proudest achievement of the UAW and then the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW), even to the point of trading off workplace rights, was winning what was essentially a ‘private welfare state’ – a set of gains that brought workers not just wages, but the security of a range of benefits, of which health care and pensions were the most significant…

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/bullet229.html

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A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
By James Laxer

A great experiment in part-time, adult education is coming to an end tomorrow.

Atkinson was on the cutting edge of the drive to democratize what had been a rather hide bound system in the past. Greater accessibility was the watchword of the time … From the very start Atkinson was about much more than upgrading professionals who needed a university degree. Without being fully conscious of what this implied at the outset, Atkinson was learning through experience how to educate people who combined work and study in their lives.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/2009/06/farewell-to-atkinson-college.html

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk
MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 22nd JUNE 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS

•    AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
•    JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN
•    WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)
•    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)
•    FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   
•    OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE
•    TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE
•    COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE
•    ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS
•    ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
D.W. Livingstone (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-44260-050-8
Paperback $32.95 US & CDN

“Education and Jobs is a profound contribution to our understanding of modern economies and education systems. Edited by one of the world’s leading educational sociologists, based on national survey data and close-focus case studies, this book makes a powerful case for new policy, industrial, and educational thinking.” – Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney

The Education-Job Requirement Matching (EJRM) Research Project team, including M. Lordan, S. Officer, K.V. Pankhurst, M. Radsma, M. Raykov, J. Weststar, and O. Wilson worked closely together for several years conducting and analyzing both survey and case study data. Education and Jobs is the most thorough exploration to date of relations between workers and jobs. The book develops a new paradigm intended to reshape future studies of learning and work.

D.W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work at the University of Toronto, Head of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work at OISE/UT, and Director of the SSHRC national research network on “The Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning” (see http://www.wallnetwork.ca).

For more information, please visit http://www.utphighereducation.com

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JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Coalition for Social Justice’s choice of a campaign on Jobs & Justice is especially apt for the continuing economic crisis affecting so many people. Talking about the public need for good jobs and in general, about  everyone’s need to be treated with justice, is a clear contrast to the sheer greed by a few persons, who seem to be able to get “bailouts” to add to the wealth they already have. The OCSJ and allies and partners advocate different goals:

+++DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is completing its caravan next week, continuing to visit communities in all regions of Ontario, to encourage people to speak out about how the economy is affecting them. Supporters of the OCSJ in numerous communities are joining union members at events in the remaining days:

June 22    At 10:00 a.m. a rally in London will be held outside London City Hall, to reinforce the points made yesterday at a rally with the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers, and Grain Millers’ picket-line at Kellogg’s in that city.

June 23    From 4:15 – 7:00 p.m. a rally will be held at the CAW Local 1999 Hall in St. Catharine’s at 124 Bunting Rd.

June 23    A rally will also take place at 4:30 p.m. in Hamilton at the Hamilton General Hospital at 237 Barton St. E.

June 25    The caravan’s final rally will take place in Toronto at 2:00 p.m. outside the Legislature at Queen’s Park.

The OFL website at http://www.ofl.ca has a link to this campaign named Join the DRV2WRK on a licence plate, with more detail for the events of the caravan. As well, at the bottom of the opening page for the Drive to Work link, you can “have your say” – that is, you can add an anecdote of how you are affected by the economic crisis.

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WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)

The Workers Arts and Heritage Centre, located in Hamilton, Ontario is seeking a dynamic, creative and motivated individual to fill the position of Executive Director. This is a permanent position which will start no later than September 1, 2009. The purpose of the job is to provide professional competency and effective strategic leadership for the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre. The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors through the Executive Committee of the Board. 

Located in the Historic Custom House in Hamilton, Ontario, WAHC works collaboratively with others to engage in artistic activity, preserving the historical, cultural and contemporary experiences of working people in their diverse identities. WAHC performs a number of services including education, research, exhibits, facility rental and a virtual museum. We have a diverse market including workers, their unions and organizations, politicians, youth, heritage supporters, newcomers, aboriginal artists, women and the public. At a provincial and national level we work in a network of labour and community arts practitioners and organizations to produce, support and otherwise engage communities in exchanges and production of cultural events, activities and projects.

For more information, visit: http://www.wahc-museum.ca/w-jobs.php

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)

Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis

The economic crisis is taking a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. Is labour condemned to watch decades of hard-fought gains undone, or can it organize an effective response and go on the offensive?

In our November/December issue, “Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis,” Briarpatch will assess the impact of the global economic crisis on working people and on the labour movement, and investigate the opportunities for advancing a new vision of economic wellbeing grounded in workplace democracy, respect for human rights and an equitable distribution of resources.

If you’ve got something to contribute to this discussion, then we want to hear from you. We are looking for articles, essays, investigative reportage, news briefs, project profiles, interviews with luminary thinkers, reviews, poetry, humour, artwork & photography that shed light on the current situation.

Queries are due by July 6. If your query is accepted, first drafts are due by August 10.

For more information, visit: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/2009/06/11/call-for-submissions-5/

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FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   

June 23, 2009
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Multi-Faith Centre Auditorium, Koffler Institute Building
University of Toronto, 569 Spadina Avenue

In December 2008, the Ontario government committed to review the province’s social assistance system. This commitment was part of Ontario’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy and was restated in the 2009 budget.

765,000 people rely on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program. And thousands of newly unemployed Ontarians will soon be forced to turn to these programs. We are all entitled to a system that gives real assistance when we need it. Social assistance must provide adequate income and meaningful supports to ensure recipients can live lives marked by dignity, decency and opportunity.

Our four insightful and powerful panellists will discuss why we need a bold Social Assistance Review, and how this kind of significant change can take place:

Crystal Chin- Crystal is currently a recipient of ODSP and an active advocate on the Barrier Free Council at Ann Johnston Health Station. Crystal has recently become involved with the ODSP Action Coalition and is a long-time volunteer at Bloorview Kids Rehab.

Marion Overholt- Marion is Staff Lawyer at Legal Assistance of Windsor and a long time poverty law activist and social justice advocate. She is the Social Justice Representative on the Windsor and District Labour Council and chairs the Ford/CAW Local 200 Workplace Adjustment Committee.

Angela Robertson- Angela is the Executive Director of Sistering — A Woman’s Place, and a dedicated community advocate with a commitment to anti-racism, feminism, community-based research, and social justice. Angela is the 2009 YWCA award recipient for social change.

Judy Rebick- Judy is a well-known social justice activist, educator, writer and speaker, and holds the Sam Gindin chair in Social Justice and Democracy at Ryerson University. She is also the founder of rabble.ca, Canada’s most popular independent online news and discussion site.

Join us to make a clear and compelling call for a bold and broad Social Assistance Review- one that leads to economic security for all Ontarians.
 
For more information about this event: email isac@lao.on.ca or call 416-597-5820.

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OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE

“In Cornwall, a high school teacher told us that while they used to raise funds for school trips and sports teams, now they raise money to buy food, because too many students are too hungry to learn.”- Irene Harris, Ontario Federation of Labour’s Drive to Work Caravan

Our Times’ summer issue (Vol. 28 No.3) will be heading to the printer shortly. In this issue, we’re highlighting the courageous struggle of migrant agricultural workers for safe and healthy working conditions and the right to unionize. We’re also featuring the recent historic union stewards’ assembly in Toronto. Plus we’ve got some great creative fiction and non-fiction, including Part 2 of Newfoundland writer Mike Heffernan’s story about a deadly explosion aboard an oil tanker. It’s a great issue, geared to building solidarity in hard times.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by June 25 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

For more information, visit: http://www.ourtimes.ca/index.php

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TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible: Ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities speak out about health care issues was launched on June 5, 2009 at the People in Motion Exhibition, Toronto.

Project Partners: Ethno-Racial People with Disabilities Coalition of Ontario (ERDCO) and Ontario Women’s Health Network (OWHN)

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible updates the innovative community-based research project, We are Visible, conducted in 1996, and highlights the experiences of health and health care of ethno cultural/racialized women with disabilities in Toronto. Through community-based research and a literature review, this project works to understand the barriers to health and health care that ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities face and whether any progress has been made to address the issues discussed by the women in the original We Are Visible project.

Both Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible and the original We are Visible report are available online at http://owhn.on.ca/wearevisible.htm and http://erdco.ca

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COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

‘Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change’ is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education and feminist popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes.
In the final part of the course you will apply these approaches to the work you are doing (or hope to do). All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support.

No experience necessary, but experience is welcome.

Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America over the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

Dates and Times: (attendance at each day & evening required for the certificate)
Sat July 25 (10:00-6:00), Sun July 26 (10:00-6:00), Tues July 28 (6:00-9:00 pm) and Wed July 29 (6:00-9:00 pm)
Location: OISE – 252 Bloor St W. Toronto, Ont.
Cost: $175 (Cdn).  sliding scale available – please ask!

To Register:  Fill out and mail in the registration form on the Transformative Learning Centre website – http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/wordpress/si2008/registration/registration-form/ Course Code: SI09 –C04

For questions contact Christine at: c-mckenzie@sympatico.ca.

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ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS

by John Bonnar (reprinted from rabble.ca)
June 11, 2009

Eleven o’clock Tuesday morning at the Workers’ Action Centre. Media and supporters are jam-packed into a room to listen to representatives of the newly formed Caregivers Action Centre, comprised of former and current caregivers working for change in Temporary Foreign Worker programs including the Live-In Caregiver Program and the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program.

To read more, visit: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/johnbon/2009/06/community-groups-fight-better-living-working-conditions-temporary-for

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Social Services, Faith-Based Organizations, and the Poor
Marci B. Littlefield
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 8 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009337627
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009337627v1

The outsourcing of social care in Britain: what does it mean for voluntary sector workers?
Ian Cunningham and Philip James
Work Employment Society 2009;23 363-375
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/363

Book Review: Gay W. Seidman Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights, and Transnational Activism New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007, $26.00 hbk (ISBN: 0871547619) xvi + 176 pp
David Bartram
Work Employment Society 2009;23 385-387
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/23/2/385

Community Service Among A Panel of Beginning College Students: Its Prevalence and Relationship to Having Been Required and to Supporting “Capital”
James Griffith
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 18 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009338218
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009338218v1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk