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Tag Archives: Knowledge transfer

Capitalist Crisis

THE UNIVERSITY OF FINANCE

Business and management theorists have so far responded to the financial crisis by centring on the notion of finance as an object of study. The inference here has been that the responsibility for the crisis lies with the flaws of individual managers, and, consequentially, that a sprinkling of Business Ethics (Wayne, 2009) and/or Critique (Currie et al, 2010) to the MBA curriculum is a suitable panacea for the recent excesses. From this we get the characterisation of the crisis as a product of individual misbehaviours in the financial sector: a regression onto the already decisively discredited “bad apple” thesis (e.g. Bakan, 2005). A different but related set of responses has sought to de-emphasize this traditional role of the business school as handmaiden to capitalism and thereby widen the curriculum to include politics, philosophy and cultural studies (e.g. HBR, 2009; Schmidt, 2008).

The questions raised in this special issue attempt to push the debate within the university in general, and the business school in particular, on from this concern with finance as an object of study and on towards a concern with finance as a condition of study. This focus upon the notion of finance as condition of study considers the various ways in which students and teachers alike have long been induced to view study through a purely financial logic: as surplus value without underlying production, as “knowledge transfer” without work. Within this special issue, our contributors therefore consider not so much how the curriculum might be changed in light of the crisis. Instead, they consider how the very study of finance as a condition of study might itself form the basis for a collective resistance to the ongoing financial conditioning of study.

http://www.ephemeraweb.org

Ephemera

Volume 9, Number 4 (November 2009)

Editorial

Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne and Casper Hoedemaekers: The University of Finance

Articles:

Morgan Adamson: The Human Capital Strategy

Dick Forslund and Thomas Bay: The Eve of Critical Finance Studies

Ishani Chandrasekara: Why is Finance Critical? A dialogue with a women’s community in Sri Lanka

Talk:
Stefano Harney: Extreme Neo-liberalism: An introduction

Roundtable:

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Sydney Forum on the financial crisis: an introduction

John Roberts: Faith in the numbers

Randy Martin: Whose crisis is that? Thinking finance otherwise

Martijn Konings: The ups and downs of a liberal conciousness, or, why Paul Krugman should learn to tarry with the negative

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Homemade Financial Crisis

Melinda Cooper and Angela Mitropoulos: The Household Frontier

Fiona Allon: The Futility of Extrapolation: Reflections on crisis, continuity and culture in the ‘Great Recession’

Reviews:

Elizabeth Johnson and Eli Meyerhoff: Toward a global autonomous university

Francesca Bria: A crisis of finance

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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High Finance

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Risk Takers

Risk Takers

CRITIQUE OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

 

 

Call for critical papers on business and management

The International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy is a peer reviewed journal looking at business and related issues that over the last couple of years under my de facto editorship has tried to provide a home for more radical pieces from academics working in an otherwise hostile environment in business and related areas. We are increasing our number of issues and welcome more papers from critical scholars which engage with some of the establishment pieties that appear in business and management. We are open to both theoretical pieces and the use of empirical case studies to deconstruct and attack bigger concepts. Past contributors have included Jane Hardy looking at how the rhetoric of knowledge transfer can be a mask for exploitation of companies that are taken over; Ben Selwyn critiquing supply chain literature for ignoring social relations and showing how bottlenecks in the supply chain can aid effective workers action; Chris Yuill detailing some of the debate about health and work and alienation; Gareth Dale and others taking apart the talk of green shift in business; Rachel Aldred attacking the misuse of qualitative research methods to support state policy and so on.

We have also rescued some papers that have been circulating in samizidat including Hugo Radice’s paper on how the higher education system in the UK has come to mirror elements of the old USSR. We have recently published an excellent piece by Colin Barker on Industrialism, capitalism, force and states: some theoretical and historical issues’, carved out of one his many unpublished papers and available from me on request.

Anyone who might wish to submit a piece is invited to e-mail me and I will get back with an idea of whether it might be suitable. The journal website is: http://www.inderscience.com/browse/index.php?journalID=90&year=2007&vol=2&issue=3

Ignore the outdated editorial discussion and be guided by the last issues of volume 2 and volume 3 in terms of the approach we now encourage.

Mike Haynes
M.J.Haynes2@wlv.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

UEL Political Closure during G20

 

PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, March 31st 2009, 3.00pm.

 

G20 SUMMIT: PUBLIC OUTRAGE AS UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON CLOSES CAMPUS TO EDUCATION AND DEMOCRACY

 

The G20 Alternative Summit must go on! Classes and lectures must go on!

  • In only a few hours a petition to Keep UEL Open receives over 1400 signatories from across the world, including well-know academics and writers, e.g. Naomi Klein.
  • University is a crucial centre of democracy. Democracy is now the only safe path for the world out of the current multifaceted crisis.

 

London – Following the decision of the University of East London’s Corporate Management Team to close down the entire university on Wednesday, April 1st and Thursday, April 2nd, staff and students have launched a petition to keep the university open, arguing that they “would feel ashamed of UEL if this institution […] were to become known as the university that had closed its doors to democratic debate and education in times of crisis such as these.”

 

The University of East London was scheduled to host the G20 Alternative Summit on Wednesday, April 1st, intended as a popular assembly for everyone engaged in current struggles for social justice. Amidst fears over ‘security’ in light of these G20 protest events, management first withdrew its support for the Alternative Summit and subsequently decided to shut down the entire campus for the duration of the G20 summit and protest events, cancelling lectures and classes and shutting the library.

 

In the petition, staff and students are arguing that such ‘security’ considerations are a “classic excuse for every historic attempt to curtail free speech. Instead of seizing the opportunity to become a common space thriving with creative energies, [the University of East London] plans to become an empty shell for two days.”

 

The petition states that,

 

“It is time for the university management to become accountable not only to the government funding bodies, but to the wider public to whom it owes both its livelihood and a duty to fulfil its role as a part of civil society. The past 3 decades have seen public spaces such as universities hollowed out by the state and by corporations, as more and more of our common resources are transformed into sterile commodities, valued only in cash terms. In universities this has led to a policy regime which increasingly sees ‘employability’ in the ‘creative industries’ or in ‘business and finance’ as the only benchmark of success by which a university education can be judged; which sees research separated from teaching; which sees ‘knowledge transfer’ to the commercial sector as the only legitimate destination for the fruits of inquiry.”

 

The signatories to the petition, which include a number of well-known academics from universities across the globe, including writer and activist Naomi Klein, are urging UEL management to “reconsider [their] decisions and take this unique opportunity to open the university as a crucial centre of democracy, since democracy is now the only safe path for the world out of the current multifaceted crisis. We must keep our university open to staff and students, rejecting the claims and ‘risk assessments’ that reproduce fear instead of promoting dialogue. We urge you to take responsibility for enabling the university to act as a truly public space for debate in a time when nobody can doubt that radical new ideas are needed.
 

 

Ends

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk