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Ilana Verdansky

NEW RADICAL PHILOSOPHY WEBSITE

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the new website for Radical Philosophy. The address remains the same – http://www.radicalphilosophy.com – but as well as updating the way the website looks and works, we have added every single item from our back catalogue to the online archive, from the first Radical Philosophy published in Spring 1972 through to the very latest issue.

Subscribers continue to have full access to and unlimited downloads from the archive, including all articles, interviews and reviews now available from RP1 to the present. If you would like full access to the archive and the journal delivered direct to your door, please consider supporting Radical Philosophy by taking out an annual subscription from as little as £24 (full details of subscription rates and information on how to subscribe can be found at: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com/subscriptions

Our non-subscribing readers will enjoy free access to all the commentaries, obituaries, conference and news reports, plus highlights from back issues and new access to hundreds of items from the expanded archive. A new feature of the website will also allow non-subscribers to purchase and download pdfs of individual items from the archive at an affordable price of £3 for any article or interview and £2 for the reviews sections from recent issues.

Articles and interviews, from 1972-2011, include important work by some of the most seminal philosophical writers of the last 40 years, including: Alliez, Badiou, Balibar, Berardi, Bhabha, Bourdieu, Buck-Morss, Butler, Canguilhem, Cassin, Caygill, Connolly, Critchley, Derrida, Didi-Huberman, Feyerabend, Foucault, Groys, Hallward, Harootunian, Haug, Horkheimer, Koolhaas, Lacoue-Labarthe, Laplanche, Lazzarato, Le Doeuff, Macherey, Malabou, Negri, Osborne, Rancière, Segal, Sloterdijk, Sohn-Rethel, Soper, Spivak, Stengers, Virilio, Zizek, and many others.

When the first issue of Radical Philosophy was published in January 1972, it sought – in the wake of the rise of the New Left and the student movements of the 1960s – to challenge the institutional divisions that it saw as contributing to the impoverishment of contemporary philosophical practice: divisions that existed between academic departments, between teachers and their students, and between the university and society. “Our main aim,” the Editorial Collective declared, “is to free ourselves from the restricting institutions and orthodoxies of the academic world, and thereby to encourage important philosophical work to develop: Let a Hundred Flowers Blossom!” In the ensuing forty years much has changed about contemporary philosophy, in the UK and elsewhere.  But as testified by our recent dossiers on transdisciplinarity, our campaign reports on the revitalized student movement, and our regular philosophically-informed commentaries on contemporary social and political issues, those problematic disciplinary, pedagogical and social divisions continue to be challenged by those writing in Radical Philosophy.

To access our expanded archive, subscribe to the journal, check out selected content from our latest issue, or download the current free gift from our back catalogue – Jacques Rancière’s `On the Theory of Ideology’ (originally published in RP7, Spring 1974) – please visit us today: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

The Radical Philosophy Editorial Collective

 

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Books

REVIEWING BOOKS FOR HISTORICAL MATERIALISM

The journal Historical Materialism is looking for book reviewers.

Books to be Reviewed:

If you wish to review any of these books, or would like to propose other books for review, please write to a.toscano@gold.ac.uk 

Theodor W. Adorno, Current of Music (2009)

Chris Alden et al. (eds.), China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (2008)

Chris Alden, China in Africa (2007)

Bastian van Apeldoorn et al. (eds.), Contradictions and Limits of Neoliberal European Governance: From Lisbon to Lisbon (2009)

Paige Arthur, Unfinished Projects: Decolonization and the Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (2010)

Maurizio Atzeni, Workplace Conflict: Mobilization and Solidarity in Argentina (2010)

Simon Baker, Surrealism, History and Revolution (2007)

Giorgio Baratta, Antonio Gramsci in contrappunto (2007)

Luciano Barca, Cronache dall’interno del vertice del PCI, 3 vols. (2005)

Andrew E. Barshay, The Social Sciences in Modern Japan: The Marxian and Modernist Traditions (2004)

Peter Beilharz, Socialism and Modernity (2009)

Daniel Bensaïd, Strategies of Resistance + ‘Who are the Trotskyists?’ (2009)

Olivier Besancenot and Michael Löwy, Che Guevara: His Revolutionary Legacy (2009)

Roland Boer and Jorunn Okland (eds.), Marxist Feminist Criticism of the Bible (2008)

Sergio Bologna, Ceti medi senza futuro? Scritti, appunti sul lavoro e altro (2007)

AA.VV. Condizioni e identità nel lavoro professionale. Riflessioni sul saggio di Sergio Bologna Ceti medi senza futuro? (2008)

Werner Bonefeld (ed.), Subverting the Present, Imagining the Future: Insurrection, Movement, Commons (2008)

Derek Boothman, Traducibilità e processi traduttivi. Un caso: A. Gramsci linguista (2004)

Philip Bounds, Orwell & Marxism: The Political and Cultural Thinking of George Orwell (2009)

Sarah Bracking, Money and Power: Great Predators in the Political Economy of Development (2009)

Peter Bratsis, Everyday Life and the State (2006)

Dennis Broe, Film Noir, American Workers, and Postwar Hollywood (2009)

Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism (2009)

Alex Callinicos, Bonfire of Illusions: The Twin Crises of the Liberal World (2010)

Andrew Chitty and Martin McIvor, Karl Marx and Contemporary Philosophy (2009)

Mike Cole, Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response (2010)

Sam Coombes, The Early Sartre and Marxism (2008)

Cristina Corradi, Storia dei Marxismi in Italia (2005)

Sean Craven, Against the Spiritual Turn: Marxism, Realism and Critical Theory (2010)

Eric Leif Davin, Crucible of Freedom: Workers’ Democracy in the Industrial Heartland, 1914-1960 (2010)

Michael Decker, Tilling the Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production in the Late Antique East (2009)

Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter, Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games (2009)

Terry Eagleton and Matthew Beaumont, The Task of the Critic: Terry Eagleton in Dialogue (2009)

Stuart Elden, Terror and Territory: The Spatial Extent of Sovereignty (2009)

Ben Fine, Theories of Social Capital: Researchers Behaving Badly (2010)

Roberto Fineschi, Un nuovo Marx. Filologia e interpretazione dopo la nuova edizione storico-critica (Mega 2) (2008)

Maurice Godelier, In and Out of the West (2009)

Jane Hardy, Poland’s New Capitalism (2009)

David Harvey, A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2010)

David Harvey, The Enigma of Capital (2010)

Wang Hui, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (2009)

Mobo Gao, The Battle for China’s Past: Mao & the Cultural Revolution (2008)

Richard H. Immerman, Empire for Liberty: A History of American Imperialism from Benjamin Franklin to Paul Wolfowitz (2010)

Ken Jones et al. Schooling in Western Europe: The New Order and its Adversaries (2008) 

Paul R. Josephson, Would Trotsky Wear a Bluetooth? Technological Utopianism Under Socialism, 1917-1989 (2010)

Ray Kiely, Rethinking Imperialism (2010)

John Milios and Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, Rethinking Imperialism: A Study of Capitalist Rule (2009)

David Laibman, Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential (2007)

Luca La Rovere, Storia dei Guf (2003) and L’Eredità del fascismo (2008)

Gianpasquale Santomassimo, La terza via fascista. Il mito del corporativismo (2006)

Tommaso Baris, Il fascismo in provincia (2007)

Loreto Di Nucci, Lo Stato-partito del fascismo. Genesi, evoluzione e crisi, 1919-1943 (2009)

Domenico Losurdo, Marx e il bilancio storico del Novecento (2009)

Manning Marable, Beyond Black & White, 2nd ed (2009)

Marco Maurizi, Adorno e il tempo del non-identico (2004)

George E. McCarthy, Dreams in Exile: Rediscovering Science and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Social Theory (2009)

Terrence McDonough et al. (eds.), Contemporary Capitalism and its Crises: Social Structure of Accumulation Theory for the 21st Century (2010)

Patrick McGee, Theory and the Common from Marx to Badiou (2009)

Jim McGuigan, Cool Capitalism (2009)

István Mészáros, The Challenge and Burden of Historical Time: Socialism in the Twenty-First Century (2008)

Claire Metelits, Inside Insurgency: Violence, Civilians, and Revolutionary Group Behavior (On the Front Lines with the FARC, SPLA, and PKK) (2010)

Andrew Milner (ed.), Tenses of Imagination: Raymond Williams on Science Fiction, Utopia and Dystopia (2010)

Sandra Moog and Rob Stones (eds), Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton (2009)

Rosalind C. Morris (ed.), Can the Subaltern Speak? Reflections on the History of an Idea (2010)

Jerry Z. Muller, Capitalism and the Jews (2010)

Antonio Negri, The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (2009)

Jose Neves, Comunismo e Nacionalismo em Portugal. Politica, Cultura e Historia no Seculo XX (2008)

Aldo Pardi, Il sintomo e la rivoluzione. Georges Politzer crocevia tra due epoche (2007)

David Parker (ed.), Ideology, Absolutism and the English Revolution: Debates of the British Communist Historians, 1940-1956 (2008)

Elizabeth J. Perry, Patrolling the Revolution: Worker Militias, Citizenship, and the Modern Chinese State (2006)

Colloque de Cerisy. La Philosophie Déplacée. Autour de Jacques Rancière (2006)

Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism: A Revolutionary Critique of British Literature and Society in the Modern Age, new ed. (2009)

Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Ideologia (2005)

Andrew Sartori, Bengal in Global Concept History: Culturalism in the Age of Capital (2008)

Simon Skempton, Alienation After Derrida (2010)

Kate Soper et al. (eds.), The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently (2009)

Marc Stears, Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics (2010)

Simon Stewart, Culture and the Middle Classes (2010)

Yvette Taylor, Classed Intersections: Spaces, Selves, Knowledges (2010)

Kenneth Surin, Freedom Not Yet: Liberation and the Next World Order (2009)

Leila Simona Talani (ed.), The Global Crash: Towards a New Global Financial Regime? (2010)

Hiroshi Uchida (ed.), Marx for the 21st Century (2006)

Paolo Virno, Multitude Between Innovation and Negation (2008)

Sheldon S. Wolin, Democracy Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism (2010)

Mark P. Worrell, Dialectic of Solidarity: Labor, Antisemitism and the Frankfurt School (2008)

Li Xing (ed.) The Rise of China and the Capitalist World Order (2010)

Update 6th July 2010 – Revised List

At: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/books-for-review/books-to-be-reviewed/

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Wadham College

OXFORD RADICAL FORUM

http://oxfordradicalforum.wordpress.com/
http://oxfordradicalforum.net/

We are excited to announce the current programme [see below!] for the Oxford Radical Forum 2010, which will be taking place Friday – Sunday, 5 – 7 March.

Once again Wadham College will play host to a broad range of critical debates and discussions on the radical left, with leading speakers, commentars, activists and academics. As always the event is entirely FREE and we are also pleased to announce a Forum dinner on the Friday night, and an evening social on the Saturday night.

We hope to see many of you at Wadham over the course of the Forum and hope that you will join us in making this another successful and fruitful event.

Contact: oxfordradicalforum@googlemail.com

Getting to Wadham College: http://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/images/files/wadhmaprev.pdf

“We view re-energising popular discussion and action on the left a necessity. Our belief in the need for an event in Oxford bringing together progressive politics stems both from a conviction in the continued and critical relevancy of Marxist and leftist ideas and theory and from the sad and persistent weakness of focused or organised progressive political organisation locally and nationally, despite such pressing conditions of political and economic crisis, and despite the very many who would under more favourable circumstances participate in such interventions. Therefore we are hosting again this forum which will continue to address these issues and draw in individuals from the two universities in Oxford, the city and beyond to consider critically ideas about social progress and transformation. Ultimately ORF seeks to contribute to a critical culture of left debate, theory and action, as well as to cement political and intellectual links between individuals and groups who will have a basis upon which to work in the future.”

CURRENT TIMETABLE

All venues will be around the Ho Chi Minh Quad in Wadham College. The exact room will be clearly inidcated on the day

FRI

2:30 – 3:45

:: DIRECT ACTION WORKSHOP

With the ‘Seeds For Change’ collective.

4:30 – 6:00

:: ENGLAND’S POSTIMPERIAL MELANCHOLIA

Paul Gilroy (author, There Aint no Black in the Union Jack; Anthony Giddens Prof., London School of Economics).

6:45 – 8:15

:: THE BLACK AND THE RED: MARXISM & ANARCHISM TODAY

Paul Blackledge (author, Reflections on the Marxist Theory of History; Leeds Metropolitan University); Ruth Kinna (author, William Morris: The Art of Socialism; editor, Anarchist Studies; Loughborough University).

8:30-…

:: FORUM DINNER

All Forum attendees welcome…

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

SAT

11:00 – 12:15

:: THE MEANING OF RADICALISM AND CONSUMERISM TODAY

Kate Soper (author, The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently; Londen Metropolitan University); Jeremy Gilbert (author, Anti-capitalism and Culture; University of East London).

1:15 – 2:30

:: THE COLONIAL PRESENT

Patricia Daley (author, Gender and Genocide in Burundi; Oxford University); Priyamvada Gopal (author, Literary Radicalism in India: Gender, Nationa and the Transition to Independence; Cambridge University).

3:00 – 4:15

:: DISASTER POLITICS IN HAITI AND RACE AND HUMANITARIANISM IN IMPERIAL DISCOURSE

Peter Hallward (author, Damming the Flood: Haiti, Aristide, and the Politics of Containment; Middlesex University); Richard Seymour (author, The Liberal Defense of Murder; blogs at ‘LENIN’S TOMB’).

4:45 – 6:00

:: ON IMMIGRATION AND FIGHTING FASCISM AND RACISM TODAY

Teresa Hayter (author Open Borders: The Case against Immigration Controls; Campaign to Close Campfield); speaker from Unite Against Fascism.

7:00 – 8:30

:: ONE MILLION CLIMATE JOBS – NOW!

Jonathan Neale (author, Stop Global Warming, Change the World; International Secretary, Campaign against Climate Change); former Vestas worker and occupier (TBC).

9:00 – 3:00 (a.m.!)

PERFORMANCE // SPOKEN WORD // GIG // DJs
@ “THE CELLAR”

An eclectic mixture of live music, spoken word and comedy, arts-performance, and – after midnight – serious dance music until late.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

SUN

11:00 – 12:15

:: ALTERNATIVE LIFESTYLES

Laurie Penny, + TBC.

1:15 – 2:30

:: MUSIC, UTOPIA AND REVOLUTION

Adam Harper (musician; dreamweaver).

3:00 – 4:15

:: MILITANT MODERNISM AND THE RUINS OF BRITISH UTOPIA

Owen Hatherly (author, Militant Modernism; architect).

4:45 – 6:00

:: INTERNATIONAL WOMENS DAY: LIBERATION NOW

Nina Power (author, One-Dimensional Woman; Roehampton University).

7:00 – 8:30

:: EUROPEAN POLITICS IN 2010

Stathis Kouvelakis (author, Philosophy and Revolution; editor, A Critical Companion to Contemporary Marxism; NPA member; Kings College London) on the current political conjuncture in France and the Nouveau Parti Anticapitaliste.

8:45 – …

DRINKS AND FAREWELLS

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Don’t Look Back
Radical Thinkers and the Arts since 1909

Thursday 26 November 2009, 18.30–20.00

On the 100th anniversary of the Futurism Manifesto, join critical thinkers Terry Eagleton, Simon Critchley, Kate Soper, Eyal Weizman, and chair Alberto Toscano in exploring a century of radical thinking and the arts – and debating what lies ahead. The recent Futurism exhibition at Tate Modern reminds us of an age when politics and aesthetics were densely interwoven in an explosive rejection of the past. This distinguished panel will assess the legacy of modernism to ask how today’s radical thinkers might understand the role of the arts at the dawn of the twenty first century and beyond.

Speakers:

Terry Eagleton is Professor of English Literature at the University of Lancaster and author of Literary Theory: An Introduction, The Illusions of Postmodernism and Reason, Faith, and Revolution: Reflections on the God Debate.

Simon Critchley is Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York and author of The Book of Dead Philosophers, On Humour and Continental Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction.

Kate Soper is a Professor in the Department of Humanities, Arts and Languages at London Metropolitan University and author of To Relish the Sublime: Culture and Self-realisation in Postmodern Times and What Is Nature?: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human.

Eyal Weizman is an architect and Director of the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths College, University of London and author of Hollow Land: Israel’s Architecture of Occupation.

Chair: Alberto Toscano, editor of Historical Materialism, lecturer in sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London and author of The Theatre of Production: Philosophy and Individuation Between Kant and Deleuze.

In collaboration with Verso to coincide with the of launch of Set 4 of Verso’s Radical Thinkers series.

Supported by New Statesman

Tate Britain  Auditorium
£8 (£6 concessions), booking recommended
For tickets book online
or call 020 7887 8888

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Feelbad Britain

FEELBAD BRITAIN DISCUSSIONS

London: Wednesday 6 May, 6.45-9pm Staff Café (Tower Building) London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, N7
Speakers: Pat Devine, Angela McRobbie, Kate Soper, Martin Jacques (discussant)  

Manchester: Wednesday 29 April 6-7.30pm Blackwell’s Bookshop, The Precinct Centre, Oxford Road, M13
Speakers: Pat Devine, Jules Townshend (discussant)

FEELBAD BRITAIN: HOW TO MAKE IT BETTER is edited by Pat Devine, Andrew Pearmain and David Purdy and published by Lawrence & Wishart, London.

The central thesis of Feelbad Britain is that after the decades of neoliberalism the institutions and social relations on which solidarity, trust and citizenship depend have been undermined. This has left contemporary British society in a troubled and dysfunctional state, without the cohesion or confidence needed if we are to escape from recession, combat climate change and restore faith in government.
The authors put forward a theoretical framework for understanding contemporary politics; and they consider what is to be done to revitalise the British left, challenge neoliberal hegemony, and develop a political project aimed at creating a greener, fairer, happier, more democratic and less divided Britain.

Contributors: The editors, plus Patrick Ainley, Martin Allen, David Beetham, Noel Castree, Angela McRobbie, Linda Patterson,  Michael Prior, Kate Soper

More information on the book at: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/books/archive/feelbad_britain.html
More information on meetings: sally@lwbooks.co.uk

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk