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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION V – 2015

Analyze, Educate, Organize: Critical Education for Social and Economic Justice

ICCE V: International Conference on Critical Education

June 15 – 18, 2015, Wroclaw, Poland

Conference website: http://www.icce.uls.edu.pl/icce

The International Conference on Critical Education (ICCE), previously held in Athens (2011, 2012), Ankara (2013) and Thessaloniki (2014), is a forum for scholars, educators and activists committed to social and economic justice.  The 5th ICCE: Analyze, educate, organize. Critical education for social and economic justice will take place in the Polish city of Wroclaw from June 15 – 18, 2015.

At a time of economic crisis, when education is under siege by neoliberal capitalism, (neo)conservatism and aggressive nationalism, when teachers and academics are being proletarianized, youth criminalized, schools and universities turned into commodities, and when different forms of fundamentalism are growing, critical education, as a theory and as a movement, is gaining in relevance. International communities of critical educators build resistance to these processes and are engaged in fostering social change leading to a more just, equal and fair society.

We invite emergent/new scholars, teachers, activists as well as those more experienced to submit abstracts that explicitly engage with these issues. The languages of the conference are English and Polish. Simultaneous translation will be provided during plenary sessions and selected parallel sessions.

Please send proposals written in the English language of maximum 150 words, including your name, a title, affiliation, contact information to iisce@dsw.edu.pl by March 20, 2015 (please indicate the language in which you will present – ENG/PL).  For more information, please visit www.icce.uls.edu.pl.  If you are presenting in another language, such as Turkish, for example, you will need to provide your own translator.

Keynote Speakers

Peter McLaren (Chapman University, California, USA)

Antonia Darder (Loyola Marymount University, USA)

Joyce Canaan (Birmingham City University, UK)

Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Adam Chmielewski (University of Wroclaw, Poland)

Anna Dzierzgowska (Jacek Kuroń High School, Warsaw, Poland)

Panagiota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)

George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

Gail Edwards (Newcastle University, UK)

Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)

Aygülen Kayahan Karakul (İzmir Katip Çelebi University, İzmir, Turkey)

Ravi Kumar (South Asian University, Delhi, India) (tbc)

Robert Kwaśnica (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Piotr Laskowski (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)

Heidi Mirza (Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, UK)

Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, California, USA)

Ünal Özmen (Journalist/Author, Turkey)

Lotar Rasiński (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Guy Senese (Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA)

Bogusław Śliwerski (Academy of Special Education, Warsaw, Poland)

Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)

Tomasz Szkudlarek (University of Gdańsk, Poland)

Paolo Vittoria (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Ahmet Yildiz (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)

Marta Zahorska – Bugaj (University of Warsaw, Poland)

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Dave Hill

Dave Hill

IMMISERATION, CAPITALISM AND EDUCATION: AUSTERITY, RESISTANCE AND REVOLT – A NEW EDITED COLLECTION BY DAVE HILL

Immiseration, Capitalism and Education: Austerity, Resistance and Revolt

Edited by Dave Hill

Institute for Education Policy Studies

Brighton

http://www.ieps.org.uk

2013

ISBN: 978-0-9522042-3-7

This is an important and astonishing book. It is a Marxist book. It systematically charts and critiques the havoc being wreaked by neoliberal and neoconservative Capitalism on society, on schooling/ schools and on higher education, across five countries: the USA, England, Turkey, Ireland and Greece. Following a theoretical chapter on Immiseration Capitalism, the first part of the book examines in detail the destructiveness and degradation effected by national and transnational Capital within these five societies, and the privatising, marketising, commodifying, degrading and impoverishing impacts within these five countries’ broader society, within/on the schooling system and within / on higher education.

Very importantly, the book goes beyond critique, beyond deconstruction, beyond anger and analysis. In Part Two of the book, leading Marxist analysts and activists from these five countries examine the Resistance to neoliberalising/neoconservatising policy and practice. In each case writers answer the question: What is the ‘Resistance’? Where is the Resistance? How is it Organised? How Successful is it? What are the Barriers to its Effectiveness? How can it be Developed to be more Effective?

In the Third and Final section, writers look to past and contemporary successful examples of Socialist Education, in the former Soviet bloc, and in Latin America, Venezuela. Again, writers, while noting the varied successes of such socialist or Marxist education, always remain critical- and self-critical.

The Conclusion, building on the critique within, summarises, and looks to the future, in terms of building the disparate resistance within schooling, higher education, communities and within the national societies- learning internationally. This book, written by noted and leading Marxist authors and activists, is an important contribution to Marxist education and broader theory- but also a spur to revolutionary anti-capitalist praxis-in education and beyond.

CONTENTS

Introduction: Dave Hill

PART 1: Austerity Capitalism, Immiseration and Education

1. Immiseration Capitalism Curry Malott, Dave Hill & Grant Banfield

2. Austerity Capitalism and Education in Greece Panagiotis Sotiris

3. Austerity Capitalism and Education in Ireland Martin Power, Micheal O’Flynn, Aline Courtois & Margaret Kennedy

4. Austerity Capitalism and Education in Britain Dave Hill, Christine Lewis, Alpesh Maisuria & Patrick Yarker

5. Austerity Capitalism and Education in Turkey Fevziye Sayilan & Nuray Turkmen

6. Austerity Capitalism and Education in the USA Curry Malott & Faith Agostinone-Wilson

PART 2: Activism within/ against Immiseration Capitalism

7. Resistance in Greece Leonidas Vatikiotis and Maria Nikolakaki

8. Resistance in Ireland Micheal O’Flynn, Martin Power, Conor McCabe & Henry Silke

9. Resistance in Britain Joyce Canaan, Dave Hill, & Alpesh Maisuria

10. Resistance in Turkey Kemal İnal & H. Tuğba Öztürk

11. Resistance in the USA Curry Malott & Faith Agostinone-Wilson

PART 3: Peripheries

12. Immiseration Capitalism or Twenty-First century Socialism? Mike Cole & Peter McLaren

13. A view from the post-socialist ‘new periphery’ Bill Templer

14. Conclusion: Capitalism, Resistance and Dave Hill, Bill Templer, Panagiotis Sotiris,

What is to be Done? Grant Banfield & Faith Agostinone-Wilson

 

Price £22 inc post and packaging

Available from: http://www.ieps.org.uk/subscriptionsandpurchasing

Dave Hill is a Marxist academic and political and educational activist. He has fought ten elections in England at local, national and European levels, been an elected trade union regional leader and, when the Labour Party was left-wing, was a Labour Group (Council) Leader. In terms of Direct Action, he has recently been tear-gassed while on anti-government demonstrations in Athens and Ankara and is an activist in TUSC (the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition) and in Left Unity.  He co-founded the Hillcole Group of Radical left Educators in 1989 and chaired it until 2001, founded the Institute for Education Policy Studies (www.ieps.org.uk) in 1989 and set up the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (www.jceps.com) in 2003. Since then, it, a free online peer-reviewed journal, has been downloaded a million times- free of charge. The journal went into print production in 2012 (available for purchase). He is Research Professor of Education at Anglia Ruskin University, England, and Visiting Professor of Critical Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland, and Visiting Professor of Education at  the Universities of Middlesex, London, England, and Athens, Greece.

Dave Hill Book

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski 

Robin Small

Robin Small

NEOLIBERALISM AND EDUCATION WORKSHOP

BISA IPEG/BLT Workshop and Film Screening: Education Meets Neoliberalism and the Political Economy of Precarity

Location: University of Middlesex (MDX), Hendon. Town Hall, Committee Room 3
Date and time: 14 February, 2014, 10.30 – 19.00

Co-sponsors: BISA-International Political Economy Group (IPEG, Convenor Phoebe Moore) and BISA- Learning and Teaching Working Group (BLT, Convenor Steven Curtis, London Metropolitan University, Higher Education Academy)

Local organisers: Phoebe Moore (MDX Law), Elizabeth Cotton (MDX Business), Merilin Nurmsalu (MDX Law)

All welcome. Please email Merilin Nurmsalu merilin.nurmsalu@gmail.com with interest in attending for catering purposes.

Website: http://www.bisa-ipeg.org/uncategorized/education-meets-neoliberalism-and-the-political-economy-of-precarity/

This workshop will critically examine the political economy of current changes in education policy in the United Kingdom and internationally as it has impacted and impacts marginalized groups as well as educators. Discussions will touch on the political economy of precarity and ask difficult questions about the flexilisation of the labour market and how it is reflected in every level of education from early schooling to adult, community, higher and trade union education and training. Participants will look at changes to education in all levels of education from secondary to University, adult, community and trade union education including the depoliticisation of pedagogies and curricula. Further challenges are brought about through introduction of new technologies including distance learning, online administration and new performance indicators, all of which we will argue can be appropriated for critical use.

The changing role of educators will be assessed as we look at critical pedagogies, the seen purpose for private involvement in education and the concept of ‘employability’, internships and possibilities for critique and intervention. In that light we invite educators, public intellectuals and trade unionists who look at the need for specific absences to be revisited. This also includes critical investigations around the understanding of the dangers of precarity for mental health, the costs of precarity for educators and students, political trade union education and the waning of working class and disability representation in recent education policy as well as the classroom.

This event is intentionally set to run the day after a very important event on similar themes run by Maureen Spencer, Heather Clay and Alan Durant entitled  ‘The state, the university and liberal education: a complex relationship between piper and tune’ on Hendon campus on 13th February. Please email Christiana Rose for more details about this c.rose@mdx.ac.uk .

14th February programme
10 – 10.30 Coffee/tea, registration

10.30 – 11.30 Plenary speaker: Matthew Watson University of Warwick, ‘Taking the Classroom into the Community’ 
Chair: Phoebe Moore

11.30 – 12.30 Plenary speaker: Mike Neary University of Lincoln, ‘Pedagogy of Excess: an alternative political economy for student life’
Chair: Steven Curtis

12.30 – 1.15 Lunch. Over lunch, Steven Curtis, Politics and Economics Lead for the Higher Education Academy (HEA) will take the opportunity to chat to participants about the support that the HEA offers university educators.

1.15 – 3.15 The Future of Trade Union Education (Workshop one)
Plenary speaker: Jo Cain, Head of Education for Unison, on the future of trade union education: perspectives from Unison
Chair: Elizabeth Cotton
Participants: Ian Manborde, Elizabeth Cotton, Martin Upchurch, Education for Action (Phoebe Moore, Kirsten Forkert, Miguel Martinez Lucio), Industrial Officer PCS, NUT, organiser for domestic workers

3.15 – 5.15 Community Education and beyond (Workshop two)
Plenary speaker: Joyce Canaan, Birmingham Radical Education (BRE(A)D) on critical thinking and practice and countering capitalist ‘realisms’
Chair: Steven Curtis
Participants: Annabel Kiernan, Dave Hill, Johnna Montgomerie, People’s Political Economy (Laura Hill and Sarah Kunz)

5.15 – 7.00  Film screening We will screen, and Director Luke Fowler will lead a discussion about his incredible 61 minute film ‘The Poor Stockinger, the Luddite Cropper and the Deluded Followers of Joanna Southcott’ which is a beautiful documentary about the Marxist historian Edward Palmer (E. P.) Thompson, who was employed by the Workers’ Education Association (WEA) from 1946, aged 24, to teach adults in the industrial towns of the West Riding. These WEA classes were open to people for whom university education was not previously available. 
See: http://lux.org.uk/collection/works/poor-stockinger-luddite-cropper-and-deluded-followers-joanna-southcott

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski   

Spyros Themelis

Spyros Themelis

SOCIAL CHANGE AND EDUCATION IN GREECE

BOOK LAUNCH EVENT

Social Change and Education in Greece: A Study in Class Struggle Dynamics

Dr Spyros Themelis, Senior Lecturer in Education, Middlesex University

MONDAY, 22 April, 2013

5:00pm to 7:30pm

Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, College Building, C219/C220, The Burroughs, London NW4 4BT

 

Event highlights:

Opening/closing chaired by Waqar Ahmad, Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Research and Enterprise, MiddlesexUniversity

Guest Speakers

Confirmed Speakers:

Tony Green, Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series Editor, University of London, Institute of Education

Professor Joyce Canaan, Professor of Sociology, Birmingham City University  

Dr Eva Gamarnikow, Department of Policy Studies, University of London, Institute of Education

Dr Stathis Kouvelakis, Reader in Political Theory, King’s College London

 

Who should attend: Research active staff, readers and professors from all Schools and Institutes at Middlesex University and other universities, educationalists, research students, media and policy makers.

This event is free to attend, but participants must confirm their attendance by email by 15th April. RSVP by 15th April to Daniela Pantica on D.Pantica@mdx.ac.uk  

 

About the Book

Social Change and Education in Greece: A Study in Class Struggle Dynamics (2013, Palgrave

Macmillan, New York). A New Book by Spyros Themelis, Middlesex University

The post-war orthodoxy postulated that education is both a mechanism for upward social mobility and an engine for economic growth. This book takes a challenging and refreshingly novel approach to the way education and social mobility are researched and theorised. The key message it delivers goes against the dominant post-war orthodoxy, which has postulated that education is both a mechanism for upward social mobility and an engine for economic growth in liberal capitalist countries. The conclusion the author reaches flies in the face of mainstream political consensus that perceives social mobility as panacea for the provision of occupational opportunities and an instrument for the levelling of the playing field. Much of what lays beneath social mobility, Spyros Themelis argues (apart from a great deal of sophisticated number-crunching) is a celebration and acceptance of an unequal system of allocation of opportunities.

This is one among very few studies that explore social mobility and attendant processes with the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. The author views social mobility not merely as the outcome of the movements of individuals from one income or occupational group into another, detached from their societal, community and family context, as in conventional mobility studies. Instead, he examines social mobility as a complex process, where socio-economic (e.g. migration), cultural (e.g. marital practices and community values) and political (e.g. political patronage) forces, experiences, arrangements and strategies interact and interconnect in impeding or enhancing individuals’ and families’ social mobility movements.

The book makes some contribution to the ongoing debate about the economic crisis that has hit Greece since 2009. It suggests that the failure of education to promote equality of opportunities is symptomatic of the failure of the wider system to prioritise fair and equitable arrangements. If Greece’s current situation is to teach us a lesson, this is to urgently rethink about the whole system, not only in Greece but in the rest of the Western world too. The myth of education-based meritocracy and unfettered social mobility has anaesthetised Western societies to the multitude of social inequalities with which they are permeated. These might be hard times, but all the more appropriate to urge us to think about positive social change.

Dr Spyros Themelis is a Senior Lecturer in Education, Department of Education, Middlesex University, UK.

The book can be ordered from this link: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=537469 

It is published in the Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series: http://www.palgrave.com/products/SearchResults.aspx?s=ME&fid=3658 and http://us.macmillan.com/series/MarxismandEducation

Details on the book were originally provided at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2013/02/08/social-change-and-education-in-greece-a-study-in-class-struggle-dynamics-a-new-book-by-spyros-themelis/

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Spyros Themelis

Spyros Themelis

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION IN CRISIS: CRITIQUING ALTERNATIVES TO THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Call for Papers

This is a stream of the London Conference in Critical Thought 2013

For full details on the conference, see: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/lcct-2013-call-for-papers.pdf

Stream organiser: Joyce Canaan

 

Numerous critical authors have recently observed that higher education is: in ‘crisis’ (Thorpe 2008); under ‘assault’ (Bailey and Freedman 2011); at its ‘end’ (Vernon 2010) or ‘in ruins’ (Readings 1996). These observations capture critical academics’ efforts to evaluate how processes of privatisation, marketisation and financialisation have impacted northern and southern university systems during the past 40 years and have led to a nearly ‘complete subordination of intellectual life to instrumental values and, most brutally, to the measure of money’ (Thorpe 2008).

Recent resistance to government policies on university has taken two forms: student-led demonstrations, occupations and actions and the emergence of ‘free’ or ‘alternative’ universities. This stream seeks to explore the latter, less explored alternatives, guided by Brown’s (2005:5) observation that the concept of critique comes from the Greek word ‘krisis’, used to explain the processes of ‘judging and rectifying an alleged disorder in or of the democracy’. The contemporary meaning of critique as ‘temporal rupture and repair’ (2005:7) contains elements of this earlier meaning; it entails and presumes a certain urgency to reconsider and rebuild, or to create an alternative to, that which has been torn asunder. Critique might also benefit from insights from historical materialism. Brown (2005:13), building on Benjamin, notes that the historical materialist reroutes ‘by rethinking the work of history in the present, stilling time to open time’. Stilling the seeming inevitability of the trajectory from past to present opens up the present and past to: ‘act[s] of reclamation’, re-viewing and thereby potentially reworking for a more emancipatory future.

Papers for this stream are thus asked to explore how emergent alternative universities today can be seen to operate as acts of reclamation—and might do so more effectively in future. Questions for consideration include:

  • What perceived limits of the public university impel a group to build an alternative?
  • Which theoretical and activist traditions inform their project?
  • What vision(s) of critical theory and/or historical materialism guide them?
  • What understandings of critical education shape their efforts to overcome/avoid perceived limits to the public university?
  • What theories of radical pedagogy inform their practices?
  • To what degree do insights from social movement theories and practices inform their theories / practices? And, in addition, contribute to the social movement literature?
  • What kinds of spaces do they seek to meet, teach and act in? Why?
  • How do they negotiate problems? What theories and practices inform these negotiations?
  • What are their strategies for reaching others as teaching and/or researching partners and how effective are they?
  • How central is praxis to their project?

Please send abstracts for 20-minute papers to londoncriticalconference@gmail.com with the subject as: ‘Higher Education Submission’.

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

A paper on the crisis in higher education, by Glenn Rikowski:

Rikowski, G. (2012) Life in the Higher Sausage Factory, Guest Lecture to the Teacher Education Research Group, The Cass School of Education and Communities, University of East London, 22nd March, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Life%20in%20the%20Higher%20Sausage%20Factory

For more on this paper, see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/life-in-the-higher-sausage-factory-the-paper/

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

 

 

 

 

Critique

Critique

LONDON CONFERENCE IN CRITICAL THOUGHT 2013

Royal Holloway, University of London

6-7 June 2013
Call for Papers

Summary – : full version here: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.wordpress.com

The second annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT) will offer a space for an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas for scholars who work with critical traditions and concerns. It aims to provide opportunities for those who frequently find themselves at the margins of their department or discipline to engage with other scholars who share theoretical approaches and interests. Participation is free (though registration is required).

The conference is divided into thematic streams, each coordinated by different researchers and with separate calls for papers, included in this document. We welcome paper proposals that respond to the particular streams below, as well as papers for inclusion in a general stream.

Central to the vision of the conference is an inter-institutional, non-hierarchal, and accessible event that makes a particular effort to embrace emergent thought and the participation of emerging academics, fostering new avenues for critically orientated scholarship and collaboration.

Thematic Streams:

Concerning Bodies
Futures of Deconstruction
Pragmatism and Political Criticism
Feedback Loops of Feminist Thought and Activism
Beyond Identity and Critique
Spinozan Politics
The Soul at Work and in Debt
New Sensibilities in the Everyday
Sociocultural Criticism After Lehman Brothers
Critical Theory and Psychoanalysis
Critique, Action, Ethics
On Representation/Non-representation
The New Amateur
New Materialisms
Three Questions for the Emancipation of Latin America
Jean-Luc Nancy in Fragments
Higher Education in Crisis

Please send papers/presentations proposals with the relevant stream indicated in the subject line to londoncriticalconference@gmail.com

Submissions should be no more than 250 words and be received by the 25th March 2013.

Full call for papers with details of the streams can be found here: LCCT 2013 Call for Papers: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.wordpress.com/call-for-papers-2013/

PDF full details: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/lcct-2013-call-for-papers.pdf

 

All the best,

The LCCT organising collective.

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-london-conference-in-critical-thought-2013-rhul-6-7-june

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Alternative & Sustainable Universities

SUSTAINING ALTERNATIVE UNIVERSITIES

UK Free University Network (FUN)

Sustaining Alternative Universities

Collaborative Research Conference

1–2 December 2012

Oxford, UK

 

They will admit that little is to be expected from present-day governments, since these live and act according to a murderous code. Hope remains only in the most difficult task of all: to reconsider everything from the ground up, so as to shape a living society inside a dying society. [People] must therefore, as individuals, draw up among themselves, within frontiers and across them, a new social contract which will unite them according to more reasonable principles.’ (Albert Camus, ‘Neither victim nor executioner’, 1946)

Following on from the inaugural meeting of the UK Free University Network held in early 2012, we are calling out to representatives of all free universities and to all those who wish to participate in a conference with a more focused objective.

In recent years, we have witnessed the accelerated neoliberal capitalist colonisation of the university. In the UK (and far beyond) many students are now priced out of higher education and the academic finds him/herself subservient to the logic and interests of capital. In response to this intolerable reality, many groups of scholars, students, and others have come together independently to create alternative, ‘free’ universities.

The ‘Sustaining Alternative Universities’ conference, as a space for coordinating research and sharing knowledge and experience, seeks to support these projects in taking further decisive steps towards the creation of a national movement of individuals and organisations dedicated to the construction and development of alternative democratic, critical, and ultimately sustainable higher education communities.

 

Sustainability: history, dialogue, and practice

The successes of this movement hinge on its sustainability. ‘How can we build, develop, and maintain truly sustainable educational communities outside the existing institutional frameworks?’ is the question upon which our collective investigations and discussions should be founded. Therefore, our collective task is to conceptualise, research, imagine, and, ultimately, cultivate a sustainable movement based on a network of locally-based, sustainable, free universities. We believe that this conference can help us to successfully undertake this task through a three-step process.

Step one: history. An intrinsic element of building sustainability today must surely be to learn from the history of previous projects of popular, democratic and radical education here in the UK, and beyond. Therefore, we invite representatives of each free university to conduct and present research into the history of these traditions in their specific locality, drawing on their own particular influences. Researchers should keep in mind the practical purpose driving this research and consider issues such as: Who participated in these efforts? How were they structured, organised, and sustained? What was the significance of their historical and spatial context? What lessons can be derived from these efforts for our own endeavours today?

We hope that this shared research effort will allow us to both map out a history of popular / democratic / radical higher education in the UK, and to identify ways these can inform our own current projects. Ultimately, this collaborative research endeavour could also help us trace the roots of our network.

Step two: dialogue. The next step is to engage in dialogue with one another, and with our histories. We need to both imagine our ideals and talk freely and openly about the challenges and obstacles that impede our ambitions and objectives today. We need to name the material, social and subjective conditions that constrain the actualisation of our imagination and hopes. At the conference, we aim to draw on our collective experiences in democratic education to create a supportive, democratic space in which participants feel able to share their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in these areas.

Step three: practice. Finally, we need to take the lessons and ideas derived from our historical research and dialogue and put them into practice. The conference will culminate in a session in which we all make plans for practical action to take things forward on a local and national level.

 

Affinities and collaborations

We invite collaboration and co-operation with all. Beyond the Free University Network itself, we particularly welcome collaboration from members of the following groups:

Academic members of the ‘For a Public University’ working group and Campaign for the Public University. We at FUN have not forsaken the mainstream university, and many of our members are not only academics or students, but also active in defending the public university. We recognise the rich traditions of critical pedagogy within the university and the enduring possibilities of its democratic promise. We welcome contributions from all academics.

Members of the Co-operative Movement. Clearly, the co-operative model of organisation offers much for free universities today to draw on, and at least one in the UK is explicitly organised upon co-operative principles. We welcome members of the Co-operative Movement who might contribute to our historical and contemporary understanding of co-operative education, and/or who would like to build bridges between these two movements.

University workers who are not academics. All too often, non-academic staff working in universities are marginalised within or excluded from these discussions. Their contributions, knowledges, experiences and possibilities are overlooked. We seek to redress this situation and invite all those making invaluable contributions to higher education in ways that are not specifically ‘academic’ to participate in this conference.

Students and all those desiring to learn. Critical pedagogy aspires to break down hierarchical boundaries between students and teachers, and to expand the right of learning to everyone whether they occupy the role of ‘student’ or not. In the democratic universities we envisage, students shape their own learning experiences. We welcome contributions from students, past, present, and future.

All others who share our principles, and who are active in creating alternative institutions in other areas of social life, particularly in education. There is much we can learn from each other.

 

An open, democratic, egalitarian, anti-elitist intellectuality

This is a critical pedagogical and political project. This conference is not intended to be a typical academic conference based exclusively on theoretically dense papers and presentations. There is validity, truth, importance, and profound insight in many other methods and ways of expressing knowledge, and we open our conference and minds to these. We believe that narrative – telling stories – is a particularly important means for reaching the personal and social heart of the obstacles and challenges that confront us in our ambitions to create democratic and sustainable learning communities.

 

Where and when

In the spirit of the Occupy movement, we have decided to host this conference on higher education in Oxford for obvious historical reasons.

We propose that the conference will be held on the weekend of 1–2 December 2012.

We recognise the high cost of transport and accommodation and ask those in a position to do so to offer contributions to help unwaged participants to attend. A system will be created to make this transparent and possible.

 

Impact and output

Only joking!

We want this conference to be the turning point at which we really begin to cultivate a sustainable and flourishing free university movement. We hope you can join us for this conference.

If you are interested in participating in the conference and/or in its planning of and preparation, please contact either Sarah Amsler (samsler@lincoln.ac.uk) or Joel Lazarus (joel_lazarus@hotmail.com). 

We aim to have a coordinating committee established by 13 August.

 

Venue

The location of the conference venue will depend on final numbers. However, what is certain is that this conference’s organisation will be guided by fully inclusive principles. This means a family friendly venue with park/playground nearby and a safe indoor space for children of all ages to play. Childcare duties will not preclude participation at this conference. Equally, we will ensure that the venue is fully accessible and that all dietary requirements are catered for. Please contact us if you have any concerns, ideas, or requests.

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

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Glenn Rikowski

14th MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES (MERD) SEMINAR

Understanding the Current Crisis in Higher Education
MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES XIV

A Day Seminar

10.30 – 4.30
Saturday April 9th 2011
Institute of Education, University of London
20 Bedford Way, WC1
Room 828

Speakers to include:
Patrick Ainley, Martin Allen, Sarah Amsler, Joyce Canaan, Clyde Chitty, Chris Knight

The seminar is free but places are limited.

To reserve a place and receive a numbered ticket, please contact Alpesh Maisuria at: amaisuria@ioe.ac.uk
A waiting list will come into operation when all the places have been allocated.

Please forward this invite to those who may be interested.

Convenors: Tony Green and Alpesh Maisuria

The MERD Seminars were co-founded by Tony Green and Glenn Rikowski in 2001. The First MERD Seminar took place at the University of London, Institute of Education on 22nd October 2002. For details of the first ten MERD Seminars, see: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=events&sub=MERD

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education

3rd ANNUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE

IN A CLASS OF OUR OWN

Saturday 19th February 2011

Middlesex University

Trent Park, London
Chair, Kevin Morris, Deputy Director of Professional Development

Speakers:

Gary McCulloch, Brian Simon, Professor of History of Education, Institute of Education, London

Spyros Themelis, Lecturer in Education, Middlesex University

John Yandell, PGCE English/Drama Course Leader, Institute of Education, London

Toby Young, Journalist and founder of West London Free School

Toby Marshall, Head of Film and Media, Havering College of FE and HE

Kevin Rooney, Head of Politics and History at Queens School, Bushey

Joyce Canaan, Professor of Sociology, Birmingham City University

Eva Gamarnikow, Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Human Rights, Institute of Education, London

To Book please contact
Kevin Morris : k.morris@mdx.ac.uk
0208 411 4310
07905 605 207

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Higher Education Crisis

NEW ACTIVISM OR OLD POLITICS? SOUNDING STUDENT REACTION TO HIGHER EDUCATION’S CRISIS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Free Day Event

The Student Experience Network

New Activism or Old Politics? Sounding Student Reaction to HE’s Crisis

30th September 2010, 11am – 4:00pm

University of Aston, Birmingham

Room 404D, Main Building

This day event will discuss likely student reactions to the impending cuts and rising fees in higher education. It is free to staff and students in UK Higher Education/ anyone else interested, but please register below.

Timetable

10.30 Registration

11.00 Welcome by Patrick Ainley, Network co-coordinator and co-author of Lost Generation? Continuum 2010

11.15 Ben Little, University of Middlesex, talking on and around his free edited e-book: Radical Future – Politics for the Next Generation. Please read at http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/radicalfuture.html

12.15 Jonathan Ward, Studentforce for Sustainable Development – Brown Dystopia or Green Hope?

1.15 Lunch

1.45 Jim Dickinson, Director of Campaigns and Strategy, NUS

2.45 Queen Mary College London University Countermappers and/or members of the Really Open University

3.45 Plenary discussion as and when.. tea and depart

Chairs am Joyce Canaan, Birmingham City University; pm Sarah Amsler, Aston University

A full guide to travelling to Aston, including campus maps, is available at http://www1.aston.ac.uk/about/directions/. The campus is a short walk from all Birmingham train stations. The university does not have visitor parking, but visitors with special needs can request a pass by emailing Dr Sarah Amsler (s.s.amsler@aston.ac.uk) and there is paid parking nearby.

Next meeting: 2 – 4 on November 24th November at University College London: Dr. R.T.Allen The Value of the Inexact, Michael Polanyi’s philosophy of tacit integration in relation to teaching and assessment (further details to follow).

New Activism or Old Politics is free, but please confirm attendance with Patrick at Patrickjdainley@aol.com

Nicola Manches, Administrative Assistant, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

 

Ruth at UEA

Ruth at UEA

Ruth Rikowski News Updates Progression 32

 

 

Ruth Rikowski’s 32nd News Update is now out. There are many exciting items, but one I am particularly interested in concerns the next MERD seminar.

The Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues (MERD) seminars were founded by Glenn Rikowski and Tony Green and were run by them both at the Institute of Education, University of London, from 2002-2007: MERDs I – X.
For more information about these events, see our website – http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=events&sub=MERD

MERD XII is being convened by Joyce Canaan, Tony Green, my good friend Richard Hatcher and Alpesh Maisuria. It will take place at the University of London Institute of Education on Saturday 21st November 2009. Whilst it is great that this initial impetus is now being built on by Cannan, Green, Hatcher and Maisuria, it is unfortunate (and is historically misleading) that the publicity for MERD XII does not include this basic information about the founders, and where to obtain information about the first ten MERD seminars. As Ruth says: “Hopefully, this anomaly will be rectified in future publicity.”

For details on this item and to view the other items, see: http://ruthrikowskiupdates.blogspot.com/2009/10/ruth-rikowskis-32nd-news-update.html

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk