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Philosophy

THE PHILOSOPHERS’ MAIL

http://www.thephilosophersmail.com/index.php

What This Is All About

The Philosopher’s Mail is a new news organisation, with bureaux in London, Amsterdam and Melbourne, run and staffed entirely by philosophers.

It is committed to bringing you the latest, biggest stories, as interpreted by philosophers rather than journalists.

Why did this organisation start? Because today, the most attractive, charming, sexy and compelling news outlets enjoy unparalled influence over the minds of tens of millions of people. But unfortunately, they rarely put out content that might make the world a better place.

At the same time, there are lots of serious, earnest good people attempting to change things, but they put out publications full of very interesting and dense articles that only reach tiny and already-convinced audiences.

So the good ideas go nowhere and the not-so-great ideas mesmerise us from every screen. Therefore, the world doesn’t change.

The goal of the Philosopher’s Mail is to prove a genuinely popular and populist news outlet which at the same time is alive to traditional philosophical virtues.

Socrates

Socrates

For too long, philosophers have been happy merely to be wise and right. This has offered them huge professional satisfaction but it has not influenced the course of society. The average work of philosophy currently reaches 300 people.

Hence the challenge that explains the birth of The Philosophers’ Mail, a new media outlet rooted in popular interests, sensibilities and inclinations of the day – but that tries to read and caption the news with an eye to traditional central philosophical concerns – for compassion, truth, justice, complexity, calm, empathy and wisdom.

The site views the rolling succession of the day’s news as an occasion for the development of insight, generosity and emotional intelligence.

News is not simply information about what is happening in the world. It is one of the key places where we daily shape our underlying assumptions about life – about what is important, admirable, scandalous, normal; where we rehearse attitudes to fear, hope, good and evil. This is why the news is a major target of concern for real philosophers.

The Philosophers’ Mail makes use of popular starting points – the stories a lot of people like to read and talk about already. It is generous to our natural inclinations: to read celebrity gossip, look at erotic images and read shock stories. It is sympathetic (as a starting point) to popular biases: anxiety about whatever feels foreign, a taste for vengeance, lack of empathy for the very poor, envy of the very rich, resentment of the powerful, suspicion of those who seem clever, dislike of awkward truths…

We start by acknowledging such attitudes: it isn’t strange to be unnerved by a Romanian family begging on a French train; it would be thrilling to have sex with Jennifer Lawrence; one can empathise with the feeling that George Osborne doesn’t quite know what real life is like; it is natural to want to switch off when hearing about trouble in Africa.

We don’t start by asking what the wise or good or serious outlook might be. There are plenty of people pushing such lines already – for that one could turn to the Economist, or the New York Times.

The epochal challenge is to reach the people who don’t engage with complex news.

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Mediation

RECONNECTING POLITICAL DISCONNECTION

Hello!

We are delighted to announce that the first issue of JOMEC Journal is now online!

Issue Title: Reconnecting Political Disconnection

See the JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media, and Cultural Studies at: http://www.cf.ac.uk/JOMECjournal

Best wishes
Paul Bowman

CV, Biography, and Publications: http://cardiff.academia.edu/PaulBowman/About

Note by Glenn: All articles available in PDF format. This is a well presented and exciting new journal. There is also a Call for Papers on the following topics: Migration; PR and News; Comparative Journalism; Journalism, Affect and Emotions; and New Media Technologies.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Lev Kulidzhanov's 'Karl Marx: The Early Years'

MARX AT THE MOVIES CONFERENCE

Dear All

This is a Call for Papers for a Conference on Marx and cinema that we are hosting at the University of Central Lancashire. We would really appreciate if you post it on various notice boards and forward it to friends and colleagues. Thanks.

Hope to as many of you in Preston next year!

Best wishes, Lars

Call for Papers
Marx at the Movies Conference
University of Central Lancashire
March 16-17, 2012

As the Lehmans Brothers filled for bankruptcy on September 15 2008 an era came to a halt. No more was there a belief that ‘the Market’ would work for the greater good as long as it was left un-regulated. As the belief in neoliberal theory and practice collapsed, many turned to the alternative theory – that of Marxism, not least because for Marx the challenge for human thought was not simply to understand the world but to change it.

Not for the first time Marx is ‘fashionable’. As David Harvey observes in his introduction to The Communist Manifesto: ‘The Communist Manifesto of 1847 is an extraordinary document, full of insights, rich in meanings and bursting with political possibilities. Millions of people all around the world – peasants, workers, soldiers, intellectuals as well as professionals of all sorts – have, over the years, been touched and inspired by it.’

The same can be said about filmmakers, film academics and students, in view of the fact that cinema, as a collective endeavour and as an industrial art, is an excellent ground to test Marxist dialectical thought. But how has cinema engaged with Marxist theory and practice? How has cinema engaged in processes to create radical social transformation, including decolonisation and the liberation of women? Is there a revival of Marxism in contemporary film theory and practice?

These are some of the questions we want to discuss during the two-day conference, hosted by theSchool ofJournalism, Media and Communication inPreston – a town of great importance to the history of the working class, as testified by Marx and Engels’ writings.

 

Papers are sought for topics such as:

* The problems of conveying Marxist thought on screen (including attempts to screen Capital)

* Representation of alienated and non-alienated labour and capital on screen

* The work of Sergei Eisenstein, Bertolt Brecht, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Dušan Makavejev, Satyajit Ray, Ousmane Sembène, Alexander Kluge, Ken Loach, Lars von Trier. Are they Marxist filmmakers?

* Western and Eastern Marxist film theory and history Socialist production, distribution and exhibition of films

* Marxism, Third cinema and the cinema of revolt

* Marxism and feminist cinema

* Marxism, realism and non-realism

* Screen images of Marx, Engels and Lenin

Organising committee:
Professor Ewa Mazierska
Dr. Anandi Ramamurthy
Dr. Lars Kristensen

Deadline for abstracts (max 250 words): 1 December 2011.
Please send abstracts to Ewa Mazierska EHMazierska@uclan.ac.uk Or Lars Kristensen LLFKristensen@uclan.ac.uk

Notice: The conference is not expected to produce a surplus value

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Age of Austerity

CRITICAL THEORY IN AN AGE OF AUSTERITY

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Brunel University, London

Tuesday June 21st
Brunel Lecture Centre
Room 207
12.00-4.30

Critical Theory is closely associated with the work of a generation of postwar social theorists. Figures such as Theodor Adorno drew on earlier critical traditions, most notably Marxism, to provide an original and sophisticated critique of society that included groundbreaking work on popular culture, politics and philosophy. Since then, new and exciting strands of critical theory have emerged to take account of the changing nature of (global) societies.

The aim of this workshop is to explore various strands of critical theory in order to help us make sense of our current age of austerity. We will also discuss the possibilities of establishing a critical theory research network at Brunel.

The workshop brings together academics from across the social sciences and humanities at Brunel and will cover both empirical and theoretical issues such as neoliberalism and culture, the Big Society, refugees, queer theory, deconstruction, politics of in/difference, law and critique, structures of feeling, and critical media studies.

All are welcome!

For further information, contact:

John Roberts (Sociology and Communications): John.Roberts@brunel.ac.uk
Gareth Dale (Politics and History): Gareth.Dale@brunel.ac.uk
Peter D. Thomas (Politics and History): PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

Travel directions: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/campus/directions/directions

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Programme Sessions:

Tea/coffee – available from 12.00

Introduction – 12.15
Gareth Dale (Politics & History)
John Roberts (Sociology & Communications)
Peter Thomas (Politics & History)

Session 1 – 12.30-1.30
Big, Little, Local, or Global Society? (Chair: John Roberts)
Nadine El-Enany (Law)
Fiona Cullen (Social Work)
Milly Williamson (Screen Media)

Break: 1.30-1.45

Session 2 – 1.45-2.45
Theory in the Humanities: Palintropes, Indifference, Queer (Chair: Gareth Dale)
William Watkin (English)
William Spurlin (English)
Sean Gaston (English)

Break: 2.45-3.00

Session 3 – 3.00-4.00
Critical Media Studies, Social Structures, and Law (Chair: Peter Thomas)
Julian Petley (Journalism)
Mike Wayne (Screen Media)
Craig Reeves (Law)

Conclusion:
Critical Theory at Brunel: Prospects for a Research Network/Centre (general discussion)

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Briarpatch

BRIARPATCH

It’s Open Season at Briarpatch!
http://briarpatchmagazine.com/
http://briarpatchmagazine.com/2011/02/22/its-open-season-at-briarpatch/

February 22, 2011

Briarpatch is seeking submissions on any topic for our July/August 2011 issue. We are looking for feature articles, provocative essays, investigative reportage, interviews, profiles, reviews, poetry, humour, artwork and photography rooted in an anti-colonial and anti-capitalist analysis. If you’ve got a story in mind, we want to hear from you!

Queries are due March 7, 2011. If your query is accepted, first drafts will be due by April 11. Your query should outline what ground your contribution will cover, give an estimated word count, and indicate your relevant experience or background in writing about the issue. If you haven’t written for Briarpatch before, please provide a brief writing sample.

Please review our submission guidelines before sending your query to Valerie@briarpatchmagazine.com

Our standard rates of pay are as follows:
$50 – Profiles, short essays, parting shots (generally <1000 words)
$100 – Feature stories, photo essays
$150 – Research-based articles and investigative reportage (generally 
1500-3000 words)

We reserve the right to edit your work (with your active involvement), and cannot guarantee publication.

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Bonuses for Some

CORPORATE TAKEOVERS, INTERNET CHALLENGES: DOES JOURNALISM HAVE A FUTURE?

SERGE HALIMI

Wednesday 2 March, 6:30pm
SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre
Free entrance, no booking, first come first seated

SERGE HALIMI is the Director of Le Monde diplomatique. After a Ph.D in political science at UC Berkeley, he has authored several books on topics ranging from an historical overview of the French Left in power to an analysis of how neoliberalism has prevailed worldwide. A specialist in American politics and society, he is also known for his critique of the links between media and business. His muckraking exposé against French journalists, Les Nouveaux chiens de garde (The New Watchdogs), has been one of the best-selling essays of the last fifteen years in France. Published into twenty seven languages in over fifty countries, Le Monde diplomatique has a global circulation of 2.4 million copies.

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’
Organised by the Department of Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar, 2010-2011

Coming Events in the Department of Development Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/events/

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THE RETURN OF THE PUBLIC – DAN HIND BOOK LAUNCH

NEW BOOK AND LAUNCH EVENT: THE RETURN OF THE PUBLIC

By Dan Hind

Published October 11th, 2010

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“A book marked by a sombre and scathing rhetoric that recalls the Frankfurt School critique of thinkers such as Adorno and Marcuse… Pointed, eloquent and forceful.”  Boyd Tonkin, INDEPENDENT

“If there is a future to look forward to, it will come from the invigorated public domain pictured by Dan Hind … This is a handbook for a very modern liberation struggle. Buy it and help set yourself free.“ — Andrew Simms, Policy Director, New Economics Foundation and author of Tescopoly

“A brilliant, provocative and sweeping assessment of our current predicament … this is a book that deserves widespread attention and debate.” — Robert W. McChesney, Gutgsell Endowed Professor in the Department of Communication, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and author of Communication Revolution

“Dan Hind provides us with the strategies we will need to reinvigorate the public debate and, in so doing, re-empower the people. Go to Mapquest and ask for directions to the next and better society; the response will be Dan Hind’s The Return of the Public.” — John Nichols, political correspondent of the Nation and author of The Genius of Impeachment

“As the official culture of politics limps from scandal to corruption, Hind turns to the only thing that can save democracy: the people. Dan Hind has produced one of those rare books that transcend the world of “discourse” and become essential levers of historical change.“ — David Miller, co-author of A Century of Spin and professor of sociology at the University of Strathclyde

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AUTHOR EVENTS

Monday 25 October, 7pm at Kings Place, London:

The Return of the Public: Journalism and Democracy in the 21st Century:

Dan Hind in conversation with Professor Natalie Fenton, chaired by Tony Curzon Price, editor-in-Chief of openDemocracy

For decades, the public has been told to leave democracy to the experts. But is it not apparent that our politicians have ever-decreasing legitimacy? Even as they amass ever more riches our financiers are now morally and intellectually bankrupt. In their different ways politicians and those who control the private economy system claim to be acting in the public interest.

Yet we, the public, have little say in decision-making and almost no power to change the terms of a series of increasingly absurd debates about economic and foreign policy. How have we been excluded from so many discussions about the public interest?

Dan Hind is in conversation with Professor Natalie Fenton about public commissioning: a controversial way forwards for a new participatory politics and a regenerated public sphere, one based on the wholesale reform of the media.

For more information and to book: http://www.kingsplace.co.uk/spoken-word/words-on-monday/the-return-of-the-public-journalism-and-democracy-dan-hind-in-conversati

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Eloquent exploration of the public’s exclusion from political participation

Our politicians have ever-decreasing legitimacy. Even as they amass ever more riches our financiers are now morally and intellectually bankrupt. In their different ways politicians and those who control the private economy system claim to be acting in the public interest. Yet we, the public, have little say in decision-making and almost no power to change the terms of a series of increasingly absurd debates about economic and foreign policy. How have we been excluded from so many discussions about the public interest?

Dan Hind traces how, historically, political and intellectual elites constructed deeply ambiguous ideas of the public, designed to serve their own ends and preserve the status quo. After the Second World War, as women, ethnic minorities, the young, and the working majority became more assertive and self-confident, the propertied and their allies in the state made fresh attempts to deny most of us a public identity. The financial crisis, and the ability of those who caused it to preside over policy-making in its aftermath, have made it impossible to ignore what has long been obvious: the institutions on which most of us rely for our knowledge of the wider world have become radically and demonstrably unaccountable and unsafe.

For decades, the public has been told to leave democracy to the experts. Now, Hind outlines a way forwards for a new participatory politics, one based on the wholesale reform of the media. After the failure of the private, now is the time for the return of the public. 

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DAN HIND was a publisher for ten years. In 2009 he left the industry to develop a program of media reform centred around public commissioning. His journalism has appeared in the Guardian, New Scientist, Lobster and the Times Literary Supplement. His first book, The Threat to Reason, was published by Verso in 2007.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 594 4 / £14.99 / $24.95

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For more information and to buy the book visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/478-the-return-of-the-public

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Visit Verso’s new website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Taweret

THE POPE IS NOT GAY!

NEW TITLE:

THE POPE IS NOT GAY

By ANGELO QUATROCCHI

————————————

LONDON LAUNCH EVENT:

THE POPE IS NOT GAY! By ANGELO QUATTROCCHI is launching at POLARI at the Southbank Centre on Tuesday 14th September, 6.30-9.00pm.

After June’s Polari Goes Pop, London ‘s peerless gay literary salon is back with Polari Goes Pope. Mark ing the pontiff’s hotly debated visit to the UK and the publication of Angelo Quattrocchi’s book THE POPE IS NOT GAY!, tonight’s line-up includes Gerry Potter, James Maker, Ste McCabe and David Hoyle.

Admission free, booking fee £1.45 / members £0.00. For more information on the event or to book tickets, call the Ticket Office: 0844 875 0073 or online here:  http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/literature-spoken-word/tickets/polari-goes-pope-54643

See the Protest the Pope! listing here http://www.protest-the-pope.org.uk/2010/08/polari-goes-pope-the-pope-is-not-gay-launch/

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The Pope Is Not Gay! is an irreverent history of homophobic and sexist obscurantism in the Holy Roman Church and an endoscopic examination of its greatest contemporary advocate, Pope Benedict XVI.

In his inimitable style, Angelo Quattrocchi traces the evolution of Joseph Ratzinger’s life, beginning with the Pope’s childhood in Nazi Germany, his membership in the Hitler Youth in Bavaria and his conscription into the German anti-aircraft corps. His has been a startling career, a story that helps explain his development as a reactionary theologian and culminates in his carefully planned election to the papacy in 2005. Quattrocchi contrasts the Pope’s doctrinal rigidity on issues such as birth control, abortion, and homosexuality to his extravagant attire and his controversial relationship with his private secretary, Cardinal Georg Gänswein. Rigidity on all fronts.

Illustrated throughout and including Ratzinger’s key writings on homosexuality as an appendix, The Pope Is Not Gay! sheds new light on the Catholic Church’s sustained interference in contemporary politics and society, and the hypocrisy of its pontiffs past and present.

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Anarchist and poet, ANGELO QUATTROCCHI (1945–2009) reported from London , Paris , and the US for Italian newspapers in the 1960s and 1970s and subsequently worked as a scriptwriter for the BBC, Channel 4, and Italian television. His books include The Beginning of the End with Tom Nairn.

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ISBN 978 1 84467 474 9 / $16.95 / £8.99 / $21.00CAN / Paperback / 192 pages

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To buy this book in the UK: http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844674749/The-Pope-is-Not-Gay!

or

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pope-Not-Gay-Angelo-Quattrocchi/dp/1844674746

To buy the book in the US: http://www.amazon.com/Pope-Not-Gay-Angelo-Quattrocchi/dp/1844674746/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283274839&sr=8-1

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Ilana Verdansky

THE NECESSITY OF ART

By Ernst Fischer

With a new introduction by John Berger

“Fischer’s range is remarkable, his powers of evocation enviable. Here the magic of the word does not betray him. He enjoys art and helps you enjoy it with him … The non-Marxist reader will feel at home, though let us hope not too much so.”—Stephen Mitchell, New Left Review

Reissued with a new introduction, The Necessity of Art is one of the twentieth century’s most influential books on aesthetics. With its emphasis on the individual’s need to engage with society, its rejection of rampant consumerism and hypertechnology, and its ultimate hopefulness, this radical, affirmative and humane vision of the artistic endeavor remains as timely today as when it was first published sixty years ago.

A committed member of the Communist Party of Austria during the time when the reality of Stalinist Russia was first coming to light, Fischer was faced with a new crisis in Marxism, and chose to fight against the stale, archaic form it had taken on in his native country. By rejecting the ossified dogma of social realism in favor of a more generous consideration of humanity, valorizing Kafka, Baudelaire, and “decadent” art, Fischer was deemed a renegade and calls were made for his expulsion from the Party. More than Marxist criticism, Fischer’s work is relevant for all those who care about what it means to be human.

In his poignant introductory essay, John Berger (Ways of Seeing) describes the last day of Fischer’s life, an idyllic day spent together in the countryside with his wife and translator that ended, after dinner, with a sudden heart attack. An admiring reader of Fischer’s work as well as an old friend, Berger is the perfect author for capturing the concerns both intellectual and all too human around which his life revolved.

ERNST FISCHER (1899-1972) studied philosophy before working as a newspaper editor, radio commentator, and writer; in the years after World War II he became a leading cultural commentator. His books include Art against Ideology.

Storyteller, novelist, essayist, screenwriter, dramatist and critic, JOHN BERGER is one of the most internationally influential writers of the last fifty years. His many books include Ways of Seeing, the fiction trilogy Into Their Labours, Here Is Where We Meet, the Booker Prize-winning novel G, Hold Everything Dear, the Man Booker–longlisted From A to X, and A Seventh Man.                                                                                                                                                                                                   

FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT:

USA – CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

UK –  TAMAR SHLAIM: tamar@verso.co.uk

Verso – Books with a Critical Edge

40 Years of Radical Publishing 1970 – 2010

www.versobooks.com

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New Media

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CALL FOR PAPERS:

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE

Media Annual Conference:

Organised by the School of Social Sciences, Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK

Date: Saturday 8th May 2010

Venue: LT-C101, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

Why this conference?

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers and civil society organisations to discuss youth use of new media and the implication this has on identity construction, public opinion, citizenship and social change. Although their development is a recent phenomenon, new media have not only opened up new opportunities for journalism but also empowered audiences and civil society organisations with unprecedented platforms for ‘free’ expression and social activism around the world. New technologies are said to have reinvigorated a sense of a ‘transnational public sphere’ and strengthened marginalized communities and provided a platform for subcultural groups and the voiceless. The possible consequences of such rapid developments on social and political change are not hard to imagine. The sweeping victory of US president elect Barak Obama (in the latest American presidential elections) characterised by the unprecedented outreach to marginalised communities including the youth through YouTube, Facebook, and other internet platforms is a case in point.

This conference aims to map out the above mentioned phenomena, focusing on the role of new media in the perceived social changes. It debates how audiences, users, civil society organisations, political/social groups and subcultures have understood and found in these technologies the right tools and strategies to power their work sustainably.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– Blogging and bloggers as citizen journalists; are bloggers making a social difference?

– Satellite TV and the internet as cites of resistance/alternative media or sets of ‘censored national enclosures’

-E-campaigning and political/social groups

– How are  activists/the youth interacting with platforms like ‘YouTube’, ‘MySpace’, ‘Flicker’, ‘Faithtube’, ‘Facebook’ and ‘Blogging’ to pursue their objectives?

– Challenges of the Internet in war zones

– The new media and women empowerment amongst ethnic minorities.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– In the absence of real democracy in some parts of the Arab and Muslim world is new media creating a new form of social/political capital: e-democracy?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in mobilising public opinion?

– What expectations and perceptions are there regarding changes in cultural and political values?

Attendance: Participation in this conference will be open to academics, researchers, policy makers, government agencies, youth workers, students, parents and other members of the public.

Fees: £35 waged; £10 non-waged and students

Call for submissions: Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 30th November 2009. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s). Deadline for full papers is 10th April 2010.

Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Contact: Please send all submissions and enquiries to:

Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator),

Senior Lecturer in Media & Sociology

School of Social Sciences

University of Northampton

Park Campus

NORTHAMPTON

NN2 7AL

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1604892104

E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk + www.northampton.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski