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Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 11th DECEMBER 2010

EVENTS

LATEST APCOL (ANTI-POVERTY COMMUNITY ORGANIZING AND LEARNING – CSEW’S MAJOR PROJECT) NEWSLETTER ONLINE

The latest APCOL newsletter featuring updates on project activities as well as articles focused on community anti-poverty issues and activism can be found at http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/apcol/Newsletter/index.html.

A new feature on the APCOL web site – an interactive Google map showing the neighbourhoods where APCOL is active with links to community sites. Check it out at http://www.apcol.ca/Activity_Map.html.

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WORKERS ASSEMBLY FOURTH COFFEEHOUSE – ANTI-CAPITALISM AND ELECTORAL POLITICS: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Friday, December 17
7:00pm – 10:00pm
Regal Beagle Pub (back room)
335 Bloor St. West, Toronto

Speakers:
– Mary-Jo Nadeau – Coordinating Committee, Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid; university teacher and writer
– Ajamu Nangwaya – Labour, community and anti-racist activist
– Elizabeth Rowley – Communist Party electoral candidate in various federal elections, including 2004 and 2006

Join us to consider the politics of elections and the left. Following introductions from diverse perspectives, join us in a free-flowing discussion addressing strategy, points of unity and difference in our movements, and the potential of the GTWA in these discussions and actions.

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VOTE FOR J4MW (JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS) FOR LABOUR PHOTO OF THE YEAR!

Labour Start’s panel of judges comprised of David Bacon, Gretchen Donart and Mac Urata selected 5 photos that best captures workers’ struggles this year. And our Pilgrimage to Freedom is one of them!  Please take a moment to vote for the powerful picture on the left taken by Gerrardo Correa of our migrant brothers and sisters who led this historic action. Please distribute widely on your lists, twitter, Facebook and any online tools to spread the word far and wide.

Deadline for voting: Dec. 31, midnight

http://www.labourstart.org/lpoty/

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INTERNATIONAL MIGRANTS DAY

December 18
3pm – 7pm
George Brown College, St. James Campus
290 Adelaide St. East
3rd Floor, Room 303 – Theatre

Join us in celebrating International Migrants Day, organized by a network of various migrant workers groups and allies.  Cultural performances through popular theatre, dance and music, mural painting, and photo exhibits will be the highlight of the celebration.

We will celebrate victories won, affirm the right of migrant workers to self-organize, and strengthen the bonds of solidarity with all workers. There will be a report back, through video, by delegates from the recently-concluded International Assembly of Migrants and Refugees held in Mexico City as well as photo exhibits of the Pilgrimage to Freedom last November.

Food and refreshments will be provided.

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LAUNCHING THE SOCIALIST REGISTER 2011!

Thursday, January 20th
7 PM
Lula Lounge
1585 Dundas St. W., west of Dufferin, Toronto
416 588 0307 http://www.lulalounge.ca

with panel discussion with local contributors:
Greg Albo, Bryan Evans, Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin

Doors open at 6, dinner and drinks available.

Sponsored by: York University Book Store, Fernwood Books, the Socialist Project, and the Socialist Register.

For more information please contact: fpeters@yorku.ca

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WORKSHOP – JANE FINCH ACTION AGAINST POVERTY: RAISING THE RATES & RESTORING THE SPECIAL DIET ALLOWANCE

Tuesday, December 14, 2010
6:30 to 8:30 pm
Black Creek Community Health Centre
2nd Floor, Yorkgate Mall
(Jane Street, north of Finch Ave.)

Childcare and TTC tickets available
Dinner will be served

All community residents, community workers and union members are invited to a workshop on:

Why raising the rate of social assistance should matter to all of us?
What can we do to restore the Special Diet Allowance?

Presentations by CUPE and OCAP

Social assistance rates are way below the poverty line, and it has remained virtually unchanged since 1995 where Mike Harris government slashed assistant rate by almost 22%.  People on social assistance are now about 40% to 50% worse off than those in 1995.  In addition, the McGuinty government has decided to restrict its $250 special diet allowance to social assistance recipients with a medically verified need for extra money for special diet. According to the Toronto Star, those with “ineligible” aliments (such as cardiovascular disease and impaired glucose tolerance) or hungry kids or no cash left when the rent is paid will be cut off.  Thousands of recipients will be affected by these changes.

Jane-Finch community has had one of the highest rates of application as well as denial of special diet allowance.

Social assistance rates need to be increased to the above poverty line and the Special Diet Allowance restored immediately.

Organized by Jane Finch Action Against Poverty (JFAAP)

In partnership with Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) and Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP)

For more information, please contact janefinchactionagainstpoverty@gmail.com
or leave us a voicemail at 416-760-2677.

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NEWS & VIEWS

CORPORATE GREED IS ERODING FOUNDATIONS OF A JUST SOCIETY

by John Cartwright, Toronto Star

Not long ago, a wealthy stockbroker drives by nine men who have been locked out of their jobs at the First Canadian Place. He stops his luxury car, gets out, and utters the words that explain his attitude to their plight.

“The watch I’m wearing is worth more than you earn in a year. Get out of my way!”

(John Cartwright is President of the Toronto and York Region Labour Council.)

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorialopinion/article/905536–corporate-greed-is-eroding-foundations-of-a-just-society

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NEW BOOK – REBEL RANK AND FILE

Rebel Rank and File: Labor Militancy and Revolt from Below During the Long 1970s, edited by Aaron Brenner, Robert Brenner, and Cal Winslow

The hidden story of the 1970s insurgency from below, against employers and bureaucrats.

From the mid-1960s to 1981, rank-and-file workers in the United States engaged in a level of sustained militancy not seen since the Great Depression and World War II. Millions participated in one of the largest strike waves in US history. There were 5,716 stoppages in 1970 alone, involving more than 3 million workers. Contract rejections, collective insubordination, sabotage, organized slowdowns, and wildcat strikes were the order of the day.

Read more: http://www.versobooks.com/books/282-rebel-rank-and-file

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FREE TRANSIT AND MOVEMENT BUILDING

by Rebecca Schein, The Bullet

The demonstrations surrounding the G20 summit in Toronto unfolded more or less as scripted. Demonstrators marched peacefully along a designated route through deserted downtown streets. A few people broke windows and set fire to abandoned police cars. Police made full use of their brand new riot gear and special legal powers. A thousand arrests. Denunciations of police lawlessness and brutality. Calls for a public inquiry. Denunciations of vandalism. Calls for solidarity. And of course, the perennial lament that the voices and messages of labour and civil society were lost in the clamor.

(Rebecca Schein teaches in the Human Rights Program at Carleton University.)

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/438.php

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ORGANIZING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS

by Jill Hanley & Eric Shragge, Social Policy

Canada’s immigration system has been shifting towards the use of temporary foreign worker programs to respond to a business demand for a low paid, compliant labor force, a trend that can be observed across OECD countries. This form of migration puts workers at risk of abusive economic conditions and undermines the strength of the workers who are permanent residents. The conditions faced by these workers are at best difficult, with little legal protection in practice.

How can global south-to-north migrant workers defend themselves from abuse and have equal working conditions?

(Jill Hanley is Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, McGill University, Montreal. Eric Shragge teaches in the School of Community and Public Affairs, Concordia University, Montreal.)

Read more: http://www.socialpolicy.org/index.php/component/content/article/4-latest-issue/370-organizing-temporary-foreign-workers

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OUR WORKING LIVES AFFECT OUR HEALTH

by The Wellesley Institute

Our working lives are an essential contributor to what keeps us healthy and what makes us sick. In this recent release, Work and Health: Exploring the impact of employment on health disparities, Sheila Block, the Wellesley Institute’s new Director of Economic Analysis, delves into the linkages between labour market policies, employment conditions, working conditions and health disparities.

Read more: http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/news/our-working-lives-affect-our-health/

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CANADA’S RICHEST 1% TAKING MORE THAN EVER BEFORE

by Canadian Centre on Policy Alternatives

A major report by CCPA Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan shows Canada’s richest 1% enjoy more of the gains from economic growth than ever before in recorded history.

The report looks at income trends over the past 90 years, revealing the richest 1% took 32% of all growth in incomes between 1997 and 2007 – the biggest piece of action any generation of Canadians has taken.

You have to go all the way back to the 1920s to find a similar trend, and even then, the richest 1% didn’t take so large a share of income.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/canadas-richest-1-taking-more-ever

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

ORGANIZED LABOR, NUCLEAR POWER, AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE CANADIAN AND U.S. LABOR MOVEMENTS
Larry Savage and Dennis Soron
Labor Studies Journal published 8 December 2010
http://lsj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0160449X10389746v1

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CULTURE AS STRUCTURE IN EMERGING CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS IN RUSSIA
Sarah Busse Spencer
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 29 November 2010  
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010384140v1

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CANADIAN AUTOWORKERS, THE CLIMATE CRISIS, AND THE CONTRADICTIONS OF SOCIAL
UNIONISM
Derek Hrynyshyn and Stephanie Ross
Labor Studies Journal published 29 November 2010
http://lsj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0160449X10389747v1

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FROM AWARENESS TO ACTION ON THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH
Spencer Moore
International Journal of Public Health, Vol. 55, Issue 6
http://www.springerlink.com/content/n24kj884563x27q2/fulltext.html

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(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):
Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF WORK AND EDUCATION – UPDATE 6th JULY 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people.

We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

• NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
• REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET
• JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE
• ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING
• COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE
• ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
• A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
• ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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NEW! FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – FIGHT BACK: WORKPLACE JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS
By Aziz Choudry, Jill Hanley, Steve Jordan, Eric Shragge & Martha Stiegman

Displacement of people, migration, immigration and the demand for labour are connected to the fundamental restructuring of capitalism and to the reduction of working-class power through legislation to free the market from “state interference.” The result is that a large number of immigrant and temporary foreign workers face relentless competition and little in the way of protection in the labour market. Globally and in Canada, immigrant workers are not passive in the face of these conditions: they survive and fight back. This book documents their struggles and analyzes those struggles within the context of neoliberal globalization and international and national labour markets. Fight Back grew out of collaboration between a group of university-affiliated researchers/activists and the Immigrant Workers Centre in Montreal. The book shares with us the experiences of immigrant workers in a variety of workplaces.

It is based on the belief that the best kind of research comes from people’s lived experiences and consequently tells it “how it really is”.

Available at your local independent bookstore or order online from
http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca

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REPORT – ENTRY-LEVEL AND NEXT-STEP JOBS IN THE LOW-SKILL JOB MARKET

Low-skill jobs are not “no skill” jobs, and the labor market for non-college jobs—jobs that do not require a college degree— is vast and diverse. This brief uses data from the 2007 Survey of Employers in the Low-Skill Labor Market to explore differences between non-college jobs that have few if any requirements and those for which either a high school degree, prior experience, or previous skills training is extremely important.

The report aims to broaden and deepen our understanding of the diversity of this labor market.

To read more: http://www.urban.org/publications/411801.html

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JULY 15 EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE CALL – SETTING UP & RUNNING A CBPR DEPARTMENT IN A COMMUNITY AGENCY: THE ACCESS ALLIANCE EXPERIENCE

Community-Campus Partnerships for Health is pleased to announce the second call in our 2009-2010 Educational Conference Call Series. In the midst of the numerous recovery act funding announcements from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), we’ve been noticing a dramatic rise in inquiries to CCPH from community-based organizations that are either applying directly for research grants or as partners of academic institutions that are the lead applicants. We’ve decided to focus the call series on answering the most frequently asked questions, as part of the over-arching theme of “Building Community Capacity for Research.” Each call includes speakers who provide answers and insights from their direct experience, helpful handouts, and links to relevant resources.

The audiofile, agenda, and handouts for the first call, which took place on June 3 and addressed the “how and why” of obtaining a federally negotiated indirect rate and federal wide assurance, are now posted on the CCPH website at:
http://depts.washington.edu/ccph/pastpresentations.html

The next call, scheduled for July 15 from 3:30 – 5 pm eastern time, addresses the question of what organizational systems and supports need to be in place to do community-based participatory research (CBPR) in a community agency setting. The call is titled “Setting Up & Running a CBPR Department in a Community Agency: The Access Alliance Experience.”

To register for the call, go to: https://catalysttools.washington.edu/webq/survey/ccphuw/78916.

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ARTICLE – PRACTICALLY SPEAKING: IMPROVING THE FABRIC OF WORKPLACE LEARNING

The rising dollar. An aging workforce. Competition from overseas. These are just a few of the challenges facing Canadian businesses. Increasingly, companies are investing in skills training as a way of gaining a much-needed edge—and Canada’s textile industry has been on the forefront of this shift, spending millions of dollars on an innovative—and inventive—workplace learning initiative.

To read more: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/PracticallySpeaking/20090616MWTextiles.htm?Language=EN

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COMMEMORATIVE BOOK “A CENTURY OF CO-OPERATION” NOW AVAILABLE

One of the highlights of the Canadian Co-operative Association’s National Congress in Ottawa was the launch of A Century of Co-operation, a commemorative book by Canada’s pre-eminent co-op historian, Ian MacPherson. The 234-page book chronicles the history of Canada’s co-operative movement through text and images from the movement’s beginnings to the present day.

The book can be ordered from CCA’s website at: http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/about_cca/100th/Commemorative-book . Cost is $50 plus GST.

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ARTICLE – LESSONS FROM THE HUMBLING OF GENERAL MOTORS
By Sam Gindin

Of all 20th century industries, it was the auto sector that best captured the sway of capitalism and the rise of American dominance. The assembly line showed off capitalism’s remarkable productive potential and the automobile flaunted capitalism’s consumerist possibilities … In the growth years after the war, the proudest achievement of the UAW and then the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW), even to the point of trading off workplace rights, was winning what was essentially a ‘private welfare state’ – a set of gains that brought workers not just wages, but the security of a range of benefits, of which health care and pensions were the most significant…

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/bullet229.html

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A FAREWELL TO ATKINSON COLLEGE (TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 2009)
By James Laxer

A great experiment in part-time, adult education is coming to an end tomorrow.

Atkinson was on the cutting edge of the drive to democratize what had been a rather hide bound system in the past. Greater accessibility was the watchword of the time … From the very start Atkinson was about much more than upgrading professionals who needed a university degree. Without being fully conscious of what this implied at the outset, Atkinson was learning through experience how to educate people who combined work and study in their lives.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/2009/06/farewell-to-atkinson-college.html

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk
MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski