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Jean-Paul Sartre

UNFINISHED PROJECTS: DECOLONIZATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
By
Paige Arthur

A major rereading of the life and work of Jean-Paul Sartre, published on the 30th anniversary of his death (April 15, 1980)

Sartre’s anticolonialism proves, in Paige Arthur’s sophisticated rendition, far richer and more complex than snide dismissals of his ‘totalitarian’ impulses have allowed.” –— Samuel Moyn, Columbia University

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In this major rereading of Sartre’s life and work, Paige Arthur traces the relationship between the philosopher’s decades-long commitment to decolonization and his intellectual thought. Where other commentators have focused on the tensions between Sartre’s Marxism and his account of existential freedom—usually to denigrate one in favor of the other—Arthur shows that Sartre’s political engagement with global liberation movements and his philosophical framework were inextricably intertwined.

Closely following the postwar movements for decolonization, and then supporting the war of independence in Algeria, Sartre proposed an influential and uncompromising view of imperialism. Analyzing the Western attitude to the “subhuman” colonial subject, he offered an account of the social constraints applying to both ruler and ruled, and came to argue that political violence—on both sides—was a systematic consequence of the colonial order. Arthur’s rich and nuanced book locates Sartre within the political discussions of his time, while also looking forward to contemporary debates about new forms of imperialism and resistance.

“Since the late 1970s, anti-totalitarian discourse has reduced Sartre to an unwitting casualty of the Cold War split. Now, Paige Arthur counters the hysteria and moralizing of the last thirty years with a carefully reasoned and erudite study that reveals Sartre for what he was: a profound and consistent thinker of liberation and decolonization.”—Kristin Ross, author of May’68 and its Afterlives

“Overcoming today’s amnesia about Sartre as a founding spirit of ‘postcolonialism,’ Paige Arthur shows his relevance for our own encounters with ‘globalization.’”—Ronald Aronson, author of Sartre’s Second Critique and Camus and Sartre

Paige Arthur is Deputy Director of Research at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She has taught at both UC Berkeley and the New School University.

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FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Clara Heyworth
Publication: 15th April, 2010 clara@versobooks.com
ISBN: 978-1-84467-399-5 Tel. 718-246-8160
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Mike Cole

MIKE COLE – WHY NOT SOCIALISM?

Professor Mike Cole has recently made the case for socialism in the Social Europe Journal in an article entitled: “Why Not Socialism?”

You can view Mike’s article at: http://www.social-europe.eu/2009/12/why-not-socialism/

Mike Cole’s latest book is Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

For further details:

At Palgrave Macmillan: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?is=9780230608450

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Critical-Race-Theory-Education-Response/dp/0230613357/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259881647&sr=1-5

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Critical-Race-Theory-Education-Response/dp/0230613357/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1259881798&sr=1-4

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Porcipine Tree - The Incident

Porcupine Tree - The Incident

VALANCES OF THE DIALECTIC – FREDRIC JAMESON

 

NEW FROM VERSO

VALENCES OF THE DIALECTIC

BY FREDRIC JAMESON

After half a century exploring dialectical thought, renowned cultural critic Fredric Jameson presents a comprehensive study of a misunderstood yet vital strain in Western philosophy.

The dialectic, the concept of the evolution of an idea through conflicts arising from its inherent contradictions, transformed two centuries of Western philosophy. To Hegel, who dominated nineteenth-century thought, it was a metaphysical system. In the work of Marx, the dialectic became a tool for materialist historical analysis. More recently, the dialectic has come under attack from poststructuralist thinkers such as Deleuze or Laclau and Mouffe.

Jameson brings a theoretical scrutiny to bear on the questions that have arisen in the history of this philosophical tradition, contextualizing the debate in terms of commodification and globalization, and with reference to thinkers such as Rousseau, Lukács, Heidegger, Sartre, Derrida, and Althusser.

Through rigorous examination, Valences of the Dialectic charts a movement toward the innovation of a “spatial” dialectic. Jameson presents a new synthesis of thought that revitalizes dialectical thinking for the twenty-first century.

http://www.amazon.com/Valences-Dialectic-Fredric-Jameson/dp/185984877X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257803840&sr=1-1

Hardback • $49.95 • ISBN 978-1-84467-877-7 • 640 pages
November 2009
Available now in good bookstores and online
Distributed by W.W. Norton: tel. 1800 233 4830
Please submit desk copy requests to clara@versobooks.com

“Fredric Jameson is America’s leading Marxist critic. A prodigiously energetic thinker whose writings sweep majestically from Sophocles to science fiction … One of the great writers of our times, not just one of the most formidably gifted critics and cultural theorists” – Terry Eagleton
“Probably the most important cultural critic writing in English today … It can truly be said that nothing cultural is alien to him.” – Colin MacCabe

FREDRIC JAMESON is the Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at Duke University. His many books include Postmodernism, Brecht and Method, Late Marxism, The Cultural Turn, A Singular Modernity, The Modernist
Papers, Archaeologies of the Future, and The Ideologies of Theory. He was a recipient of the 2008 Holberg International Memorial Prize.

 Links:
   1. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   2. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   3. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   4. http://www.amazon.com/Archaeologies-Future-Desire-Science-Fictions/dp/1844675386/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257805858&sr=1-2

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RETHINKING 1968

Call for Papers
“Rethinking 1968”
PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture
Special Issue

The events of 1968 shook the world. On the 40th anniversary > of the protests in France, Germany and the United States, the EPTC organized a series of panels to investigate these industrial and student actions, and whether they can serve as a basis for critiquing our current political climate. We want to ask if the philosophical underpinnings of these revolutionary acts have continued relevance today.

For example, in France, the French phenomenologist and existentialist, turned Marxist, Jean-Paul Sartre was held up as one of the intellectuals who could provide an intellectual basis for the revolution. Alongside structuralists like Althusser, Sartre was viewed as an intellectual god-father of the movement, not only because of his writings critical of capitalism and the bourgeois system, be they his early writings on existentialism, or his later reformulation of Marxism in the Critique of Dialectical Reason, nor because he linked left-wing activism in the first world with support for the oppressed elsewhere, but because he was willing to lend his name and support to the Maoists against the Gaullist government.

Similarly, in Germany, two philosophers, the phenomenologically-inspired and Marxist Herbert Marcuse and the neo-Marxist and member of the Frankfurt School Jürgen Habermas were central figures for the student revolutionaries. As a member of the Frankfurt School’s second generation, Habermas was viewed by the students as safely removed from the alleged post-World War II conservatism of Adorno and Horkheimer. For the first several years following its publication, Habermas’s habilitation thesis, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, was a text central to the student struggle in Germany. Similarly, Marcuse’s texts, Reason and Revolution, Eros and Civilization, and One-Dimensional Man, as well as his occasional writings, were used as rallying cries by the left both in Europe and in the United States.

The question we propose for this volume is: what relevance do these philosophers’s works have today, in light of the continued expansion of the capitalist system, and the fact that student leaders like Daniel Cohn-Bendit, Bernard Kouchner, and Joschka Fischer have renounced extra-political activities and joined the political mainstream? We are interested in papers that explore the relevance of the philosophical critiques that inspired the movements of 1968 for present day radical politics, including papers that use the philosophical inspirations behind 1968:

(1) To critique global capitalism while providing a positive way forward,
(2) To examine American hegemony,
(3) To examine possibilities for overturning existing political structures in either the developed or developing world,
(4) To examine issues surrounding the environment or environmental justice,
(5) Or any other topic, provided that the paper deals extensively with the philosophical ideas of 1968 and their relevance for today’s changed political landscape.

Interested authors should submit a copy of their paper in RTF or WORD format to PhaenEx’s website: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

Queries should be sent to Kevin W. Gray at: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca

The submission deadline is July 1, 2009.

Contact: Kevin W. Gray, Faculté de Philosophie, Université Laval,Québec, QC G1K 7P4, Canada. Phone: +1 845 228.8548, Skype: kevinwgray, Email: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca
Web: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

 

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