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The Island

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH POSITION IN CRITICAL STUDIES OF THE INTERNET AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

For questions about this position, please contact me best by phone on +46 18 471 1019 or make a Skype appointment.

Christian Fuchs

* * *

http://www.personalavd.uu.se/ledigaplatser/2206postDoc.html

Uppsala University hereby declares the following position to be open for application:
Postdoc Research Position in Critical Studies of the Internet and the Information Society

at the Department of Informatics and Media.
The position is temporary (January 1st, 2012 – December 31st, 2013). The employment can be prolonged for one year.

Work Tasks:
* Research in the area of Internet privacy studies, Internet surveillance studies, information society studies.
* Research in externally funded research projects.
* Research administration.

Qualifications:
* Doctoral degree in social sciences.
* Research and publishing experience in all or some the following areas:
Internet studies, information society studies, Internet privacy studies,
Internet surveillance studies, Internet & society
* Background and experience in critical studies of digital media and society
* Solid foundation in qualitative and quantitative empirical social science research methods
* Solid foundation in social theory and philosophy of the information society and social theory and philosophy of digital media & society
* Interest to work in the field of Internet privacy- & Internet surveillance-studies
* Willingness to work in externally funded research projects
* Excellent command of written and spoken academic English

The application should include:
* a CV
* a scan/copy of the PhD degree
* a copy/scan of at least one recommendation letter
* electronic versions of the two most important published articles or book chapters (in the case of monographs, please select specific chapters)
* an application letter detailing answers to the following questions:
1. What are your academic goals and major research interests for the coming five years?
2. Why are you interested in this position?
3. What qualifies you for this position?
4. What are your expectations about this position and the work at the Department of Informatics and Media?
5. What have been the major results of your research and how do they connect to the announced position?
6. Describe shortly the topic of your dissertation and why you have chosen it.
7. How do you see the state of the art of Internet Studies in general and
Internet privacy and surveillance studies in particular? How can the state of the art of the field be advanced and what could be your contribution?
8. Describe your knowledge of social science research methods and social theory.

Uppsala University is striving to promote equality by advancing gender balance. The majority of employees are men, so we encourage female applications.

Information about the employment, Professor for Media and Communication Studies: Christian Fuchs (christian.fuchs@im.uu.se): +46 18 471 1019; Head of the Department and Professor Mats Edenius:  +46 18 471 11 76. 
Representatives from the Union are: Anders Grundström, Saco-rådet, +46 18-471 53 80, Carin Söderhäll, TCO/ST, +46 18-471 19 96 och Stefan Djurström, tel. +46 18-471 33 15.

You are welcome to submit your application no later than 31st October, 2011, UFV-PA 2011/2206. Use the link below to access the application form.

http://www.personalavd.uu.se/ledigaplatser/2206postDoc.html


Professor Christian Fuchs
Chair in Media and Communication Studies
Department of Informatics and Media
Uppsala University
Kyrkogårdsgatan 10

Information

Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
christian.fuchs@im.uu.se
Tel +46 (0) 18 471 1019
http://fuchs.uti.at
http://www.im.uu.se
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Editor of tripleC: http://www.triple-c.se
Book “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011)
Book “Internet and Society” (Paperback, Routledge 2010)

 

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Archive

BEYOND 2.0: NEW MODELS OF INFORMATION

A Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) in Sussex Event

Thursday 19th May, 4-6pm – University of Brighton

As the web matures and Web 2.0 and social media services become embedded in our everyday lives the information world is entering a new phase. The vast quantities of data being generated by these new services, the challenges posed to traditional publishers and the plethora of new devices such as iPads and smart phones will change the work of information professionals over the coming decade.

This talk, by Dr Martin De Saulles of the University of Brighton, will outline some of the challenges as well as the opportunities for those who work with information. It will be followed by an opportunity for questions and discussion. 

Venue: Watts Building, University of Brighton, Lewes Rd, Brighton BN2 4GJ

Cost: £5 for CILIP members, £10 for non-members

Light refreshments will be available.

To book your place, contact Audrey Marshall by email: a.m.marshall@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Books

FOUNDATIONS OF CRITICAL MEDIA AND INFORMATION STUDIES

A New Book by Christian Fuchs

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-58881-2. 384 pages. Rouledge Advances in Sociology No. 52, 2011

More information: http://fuchs.uti.at/books/foundations-of-critical-media-and-information-studies/

Available from the same author: “Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age” (Paperback 2011) http://fuchs.uti.at/books/internet-society/

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies lays down foundations for the analysis of media, information, and information technology in 21st century information society, as well as introducing the theoretical and empirical tools necessary for the critical study of media and the information society.

Reasons for reading this book:
* To find out more about critical theory today: The book updates critical theory for 21st century information society.
* To acquire tools for critical analyses: The book introduces methodological and theoretical tools for studying media, information technology, and the information society in a critical way.
* To read more about a critical theory of media and the information society: The book explains the foundations of a critical theory of media, information, information technology, and the information society.
* To find out more about how power structures frame the media and the Internet: The book provides a power structure analysis of the media and the Internet.
* To engage with alternative media and the alternative Internet: The book identifies alternative potentials of the media, culture, and the Internet.

Contents

1 Introduction

PART I: Theory

2 Critical theory today
3 Critical media and information studies
4 Marx and critical media and information studies

PART II: Case studies

5 The media and information economy and the new imperialism
6 The new crisis of capitalism and the role of the media and information economy
7 Participatory web 2.0 as ideology

PART III Alternatives

8 Alternative media as critical media
9 Conclusion


Professor Christian Fuchs
Chair in Media and Communication Studies
Department of Informatics and Media
Uppsala University
Kyrkogårdsgatan 10
Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
christian.fuchs@im.uu.se
Tel +46 (0) 18 471 1019
http://fuchs.uti.at
http://www.im.uu.se
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Editor of tripleC: http://www.triple-c.at
Book “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011)
Book “Internet and Society” (Paperback, Routledge 2010)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Bonuses for Some

CORPORATE TAKEOVERS, INTERNET CHALLENGES: DOES JOURNALISM HAVE A FUTURE?

SERGE HALIMI

Wednesday 2 March, 6:30pm
SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre
Free entrance, no booking, first come first seated

SERGE HALIMI is the Director of Le Monde diplomatique. After a Ph.D in political science at UC Berkeley, he has authored several books on topics ranging from an historical overview of the French Left in power to an analysis of how neoliberalism has prevailed worldwide. A specialist in American politics and society, he is also known for his critique of the links between media and business. His muckraking exposé against French journalists, Les Nouveaux chiens de garde (The New Watchdogs), has been one of the best-selling essays of the last fifteen years in France. Published into twenty seven languages in over fifty countries, Le Monde diplomatique has a global circulation of 2.4 million copies.

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’
Organised by the Department of Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

Convenor: Professor Gilbert Achcar, 2010-2011

Coming Events in the Department of Development Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/events/

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Lost Generation

DISCOURSE, POWER AND RESISTANCE IN EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2011

DPR10: Discourse, Power, Resistance Conference 2011

Theme: CHANGING EDUCATION

University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, 13-15 April 2011
Sponsored by the School of Secondary and Further Education Studies

Official DPR Conference Website: http://www.dprconference.com

The DPR conference returns to Plymouth in its tenth year, bringing together learners, teachers, researchers and policy-makers from the international education community to look at the crises in contemporary education, not just at post-compulsory level but across the board from pre-school to post-graduate. The need for change in education has never been more urgent. The conference will bring colleagues from around the world to think radically about education changing, and needing to change.

The conference will be divided into 7 streams:

– What is the point of education?
– Anticipative education: policy and practice
– Education in a funding crisis
– Widening participation: for real
– Education across the boundaries of faith: challenging fear and hatred
– The future of post-compulsory education: the internet and 
   the role of the university
– DPR: open

The DPR conference is a site for the radical critique of discourse, power and resistance within and beyond the discipline of education, looking at concerns which are currently troubling learners, teachers and researchers engaged at all stages from pre-school to postgraduate. The conference looks more widely at the impact on education of powerful interests in and behind the policy-making apparatus as they exert their influence to reshape the goals and ethos of learning, teaching and research. DPR transgresses inter-disciplinary boundaries, attracting scholars from across the humanities and social sciences. A continuing concern of the conference is the contested issue of research methodology and the related issues of the problem of knowledge.

The conference has an international reputation, drawing delegates from a wide range of the developed and developing nations and attracting world-class keynote speakers.

The DPR journal, Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER), was launched in 2009.

For full information, including a Call for Papers and registration details, please visit the conference website: http://www.dprconference.com

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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Uncertainty in Higher Education

UNIVERSITIES AS KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTIONS IN THE NETWORKED AGE

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR SPECIAL ISSUE

Universities as Knowledge Institutions in the Networked Age

Guest Editors: PHILIPPE AIGRAIN, JUAN CARLOS DE MARTIN & URS GASSER

The journal Policy Futures in Education (PFIE) – available online at www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE – will publish a special issue on the impact of information technology and the Internet on universities: to keep and develop their role as knowledge institutions, how should universities reshape in this new environment? Sub-topics, such as open access to scientific literature and distance learning, have an established track of studies and proposals. However, it has not been common so far to aim at an integrated analysis of how universities will and should change to accommodate the changes brought by cyberspace in their specific role of knowledge user, processor, producer and disseminator.

One topic to be addressed is how the process of learning within universities will change because of the Internet and digital devices. For centuries, college student were educated by listening to their professor read aloud selected books taken from the university library (‘lesson’ comes, in fact, from ‘lectio’, Latin for ‘reading session’). Gutenberg changed that by making books cheaper and therefore more amenable to individual ownership and private reading, but the typical university lesson ended up not changing much anyway. Thanks to technology, we are now experiencing, at least potentially, a Renaissance of learning methods: from e-books to podcasts, from virtual worlds classrooms to streaming, from computer-assisted learning to videogames, the avenues of learning have increased dramatically. Are we heading towards purely technology-mediated learning strategies? Is the old Socratic professor-student direct approach completely obsolete? Doesn’t the wider spectrum of approaches offer the opportunity to educate those students who have always been uncomfortable with the traditional approach? What about the impact on lifelong learning?

A second topic is how research will be affected by the Internet. A major potential impact will be on the way research results will be communicated in the future. The scientific paper as a rhetorical device is increasingly under pressure in favour of more flexible, digitally-enabled forms of communication, mostly based on semantic web technologies. How would the decline of the scientific paper affect science? What about the role of search engines in the future of research? Will the Internet enable new forms of evaluation of scientific results? How would that change the centuries-old mechanism of recognition and promotion within the scientific community? Moreover, the transition towards digital knowledge seem to affect trends towards commercialization of knowledge at universities and knowledge institutions, and the impact those trends have on knowledge generation. Additionally, the Internet seem to be increasing the tension between the growing specialization of research activities and the aspiration towards increased interdisciplinarity.

The third topic regards how should universities use cyberspace to best implement their mission with respect to society. In recent years society has been asking universities to do more than simply – albeit crucially – educate students and produce new academic knowledge. The list of new demands include life-long education, open access to scientific papers and educational resources, and encouragement and support for spin-offs and start-ups. But is that it? Of course not. Public education, at all levels, was born with a clear mandate to educate citizens and to increase social mobility, not simply provide students with marketable skills and bookshelves with new scientific journals. Moreover, in our age the increasingly complex problems that we are facing as society, from global warming to water supplies, from the environment to energy issues, from the challenges (and opportunities) presented by bio-genetics and nanotechnology, don’t call for a renewal of the concept of University as Public Institution? In other words, don’t universities – as institutions as well as through their individual researchers – have a duty to engage more frequently in the public sphere, placing their super skills and knowledge at the service of citizens – and their representatives – to allow them to properly deliberate? If so, how? What would be appropriate and what would, instead, constitute a deontological breach of professorial decorum and integrity? If it is indeed important, shouldn’t universities allow/favour internal organizational changes to better implement such social role? How is that social role linked to freedom of research? Is the growing need of universities in many countries to court potential private investors (or governments) affecting it? If so, what could the consequences be for our societies? Doesn’t the Internet offer extraordinary tools to empower the public sphere presence of universities, professors and students, and to help to reduce social and cultural divides?

The special issue builds upon the COMMUNIA 2010 Conference on University and Cyberspace – Reshaping Knowledge Institutions for the Networked Age, held at Turin, 28-30 June 2010.

Submitters can visit the conference site and access material originating from the conference at http://www.communia2010.org

Possible issues relating to the above topics include:

– Digital Natives: how will the characteristics of the new generations of students, faculty and staff shape the future of universities?
– The Spatial Infrastructure: physical and virtual spaces for higher education
– The Use of Digital Technology in the Classroom
– Open Access to Scientific Results (papers, data, software)
– Open Educational Resources
– Educational Videogames
– Digital Devices as Platform for Learning
– Non-formal Education via the Internet
– Digital Divide and Higher Education
– Long-term Knowledge Preservation in a Digital Age
– Academic Production and the Knowledge Commons
– Digital and Physical Social Networks
– Intellectual Property and Academic Production
– Physical and Digital Library
– Semantic Web Technologies Applied to Scientific Results and Educational Resources

Papers should be sent as email attachments: pfie-specialissue@nexa.polito.it

Deadline for submissions: 15 January 2011

All papers submitted will be evaluated using the PFIE’s normal peer review process. Please also see the Journal’s information for authors: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/howtocontribute.asp

EDITORIAL CONTACTS

Dr Philippe Aigrain
CEO, Sopinspace
4, passage de la Main d’Or
F-75011 Paris
France
philippe.aigrain@sopinspace.com

Professor Juan Carlos De Martin
Co-Director, NEXA Center for Internet & Society
Politecnico di Torino – DAUIN
Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24
I-10129 TORINO
Italy
demartin@polito.it

Urs Gasser
Executive Director
Berkman Center for Internet & Society
23 Everett Street, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
USA
ugasser@cyber.law.harvard.edu

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Radical Politics

SERIES ON COMMU(O)NISM: OPEN PROCESS, THE ORGANIZATIONAL SPIRIT OF THE INTERNET MODEL

Abstract: The desires and the sources of emancipatory potential of the commons for the cooperative and egalitarian global togetherness, for a new communism born through the new generation of tools and organizational practices, have temporarily been appropriated and hi-jacked by capitalism under the Open Source and to an extent Creative Commons movements. Through and with the Open Process methods of the founding Internet communities, we can make a significant step towards claiming it back. Commu(o)nism, we could call it, is a new emerging form of communism hacked with open process and new commons. The small (o) in the middle stands for open.

Tuesday 16th March, 14-16.00hrs
Room WB117 (Whitehead building, opposite Ian Gulland)
Goldsmiths College, University of London

Gabriella Coleman

”Old and New Net Wars over Free Speech, Freedom and Secrecy, or How to Understand the Hacker and Lulz battle against the Church of Scientology”

Abstract: Why have geeks been compelled to protest the Church of Scientology vehemently for nearly two decades? This talk starts with this question to present a cultural history and political analysis of one of the oldest Internet wars, often referred to as “Internet vs Scientology.” During the 1990s, this war was waged largely on USENET (a large scale messaging board system), while in recent times it has taken the form of “Project Chanology.” This project is orchestrated by a loosely defined group called “Anonymous” who has led a series of online attacks and real world protests, often using a variety of media, against Scientology. I argue that to understand the significance of these battles and protests, we must examine how the two groups stand in a culturally antipodal relation to each other. Through this analysis of cultural inversion, I will consider how long-standing liberal ideals take cultural root in the context of these battles, use these two cases to reveal important political transformations in Internet/hacker culture between the mid 1990s and today and finally will map the tension between pleasure/freedom (the “lulz”) and moral good (“free speech”) found among Anonymous in terms of the tension between liberal freedom and romantic-Nietzschean freedom/pleasure.

Bios:

Gabriella Coleman

Trained as a Cultural Anthropologist, Gabriella Coleman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at NYU. She researches and teaches on the politics of digital media with a focus on various genealogies of hacking, including Free and Open Source Software, the hacker ungrounded , phone phreaking, trolling, and cryptography/encryption. Between 2001-2003 she conducted ethnographic research on computer hackers primarily in San Francisco and the Netherlands, as well as on the largest free software project, Debian. She is completing a book manuscript “Coding Freedom: Hacker Pleasure and the Ethics of Free and Open Source Software” and is starting a new project on peer to peer patient activism on the Internet.

Toni Prug

Toni Prug is currently a PhD student at the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary College, University of London. With ten years of software and network engineering and hacking behind him, he is working on organizational forms, hacking existing practices, ideologies and state-forms. Along with working with academic journals on implementing aspects of open process cooperation, he is working on a book, “The Objects of Communism”. His work can be followed at http://hackthestate.org/.

Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London: http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/

Location: http://www.gold.ac.uk/find-us/

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New Media

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CALL FOR PAPERS:

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE

Media Annual Conference:

Organised by the School of Social Sciences, Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK

Date: Saturday 8th May 2010

Venue: LT-C101, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

Why this conference?

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers and civil society organisations to discuss youth use of new media and the implication this has on identity construction, public opinion, citizenship and social change. Although their development is a recent phenomenon, new media have not only opened up new opportunities for journalism but also empowered audiences and civil society organisations with unprecedented platforms for ‘free’ expression and social activism around the world. New technologies are said to have reinvigorated a sense of a ‘transnational public sphere’ and strengthened marginalized communities and provided a platform for subcultural groups and the voiceless. The possible consequences of such rapid developments on social and political change are not hard to imagine. The sweeping victory of US president elect Barak Obama (in the latest American presidential elections) characterised by the unprecedented outreach to marginalised communities including the youth through YouTube, Facebook, and other internet platforms is a case in point.

This conference aims to map out the above mentioned phenomena, focusing on the role of new media in the perceived social changes. It debates how audiences, users, civil society organisations, political/social groups and subcultures have understood and found in these technologies the right tools and strategies to power their work sustainably.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– Blogging and bloggers as citizen journalists; are bloggers making a social difference?

– Satellite TV and the internet as cites of resistance/alternative media or sets of ‘censored national enclosures’

-E-campaigning and political/social groups

– How are  activists/the youth interacting with platforms like ‘YouTube’, ‘MySpace’, ‘Flicker’, ‘Faithtube’, ‘Facebook’ and ‘Blogging’ to pursue their objectives?

– Challenges of the Internet in war zones

– The new media and women empowerment amongst ethnic minorities.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– In the absence of real democracy in some parts of the Arab and Muslim world is new media creating a new form of social/political capital: e-democracy?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in mobilising public opinion?

– What expectations and perceptions are there regarding changes in cultural and political values?

Attendance: Participation in this conference will be open to academics, researchers, policy makers, government agencies, youth workers, students, parents and other members of the public.

Fees: £35 waged; £10 non-waged and students

Call for submissions: Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 30th November 2009. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s). Deadline for full papers is 10th April 2010.

Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Contact: Please send all submissions and enquiries to:

Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator),

Senior Lecturer in Media & Sociology

School of Social Sciences

University of Northampton

Park Campus

NORTHAMPTON

NN2 7AL

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1604892104

E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk + www.northampton.ac.uk

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