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Test Dept

Test Dept

FUEL TO FIGHT DS30: TEST FILM & BOOK EVENT

June 13 @ 6PM, firstsite, Colchester: http://www.firstsite.uk.net/page/fuel-to-fight-ds30-test-dept-film-book-event
Followed by party at the Waiting Room
The legendary London industrial noise musicians Test Dept are presenting a special screening of their film DS30 at the firstsite on the 13 June.

Marking 30 years since the 1984-5 miners’ strike, DS30 is a political collage of sound and image. The film is set within the monumental structural lines of Dunston Staiths built on the River Tyne in 1893 to ship coal from the Durham coalfields to the world. Featuring footage of mining communities and industry along the River Tyne and of the wider mining community together with footage and sounds from Test Dept’s own archive related to the strike, DS30 reflects on the group’s nationwide Fuel to Fight Tour in support of the miners, during which they collaborated with local activists and mining communities. These included Kent miner Alan Sutcliffe, who performed as writer and guest vocalist on live and recorded material and the South Wales Striking Miners’ Choir, with whom they recorded the album ‘Shoulder to Shoulder’ to raise money for the Miners’ Hardship Fund.

This screening of DS30 is accompanied by a selection of archive material of the group on film and video and will be followed by a Q & A with founding member Paul Jamrozy, who will be joined by Peter Webb (from PC Press), and Stevphen Shukaitis (from the University of Essex).

This event also celebrates the release of the book Total State Machine, a major historical document and visual representation of Test Dept, published by PC-Press. There will be a launch event following the screening.

Test Dept formed in the decaying docklands of South London in late 1981. The group made raw, visceral music out of re-purposed scrap metal and machinery scavenged from industrial waste-ground and derelict factories; a percussive sound with a political edge performed live against monumental slide and film projections in recently abandoned industrial spaces. Drilling, pounding, grinding, metal bashing – a Constructivist/Futurist-inspired soundtrack to the death throes of industrial Britain.

SCHEDULE
6:00 PM Doors Open
6:15-7:15: Film screening
7:15-8:00 Discussion with Test Department
8:00-11:00 Move to Waiting Room for drinks, DJs

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/695456000563749/

Stevphen Shukaitis

Autonomedia Editorial Collective

http://www.autonomedia.org

http://www.minorcompositions.info

images (2)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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An Industrial Sewing Machine

An Industrial Sewing Machine

FACTORY LIFE

Lyka Thorn

At the age of fifteen I started working in a factory. This was three years before the law allowed. I was able to work there because it was a small family-run garment factory in the city, not a big multinational one, and they did not worry about such things. I worked about twelve hours a day from 7am until 7pm. I didn’t know anything about the work but I tried hard and they came to teach me how to work the machines. It was very dangerous; I had to be careful all the time. The factory was in a big house with no windows. It was very noisy, and we couldn’t talk to each other.

After about three months, I was moved to another factory owned by the same family, and at the same time I changed from working days to the night shift. This factory was in a villa on the outskirts of the city. It had a lovely garden, although we couldn’t see it when we were working because, again, there were no windows. This was partly to keep the noise in, and partly to stop people looking in. It was a bit quieter, and I met a lot of new friends. We worked hard for just US $3.50 a day – 7 days a week until the order was completed. After that we had to wait up to a day without pay, before starting on the next order. The industrial sewing machine I used was large and cumbersome, encompassing twenty individual sewing devices. I had to stand up and walk from one side of the machine to the other, checking for problems for about 12 hours a day. In the first two and a half years, I got the needle of the machine stuck in my finger three times. When this happened, my workmates would remove the needle with a pair of pliers, making sure that none of the needle was left inside my finger. One of these times, I had to go to see the doctor because my friends couldn’t find the point of the needle. Fortunately the doctor couldn’t find it in my finger, either.

One night I went to work and felt pain of all over my body. I knew I was sick but I carried on working until I fell over, the result of being on my feet every day for extended periods, and eating irregularly and inconsistently. I had to go to the clinic where the doctor gave me medicine to build me up. He asked me why I had rheumatism at such a young age. I was off work about a week in pain and with a fever. For each day I was unable to work, $3.50 was deducted from my wages.

After three years, I started studying English when the night shifts were over. I had only seven hours free time a day. Life was tough. After studying for a year, I had to give it up at the age of nineteen because a marriage was being arranged for me. We never actually got married but started living together.

Soon, I discovered I was pregnant and had to give up work because of morning sickness. I decided to stop working until the baby was born. When I was seven months pregnant my partner left me after a big argument with my dad, and after a month I moved back to my family home.

My baby was born on the 19 September 2007 at 11 am, after I had been in labour for twelve hours, and when I saw her I forgot about all the pain. She looked very cute and all my family loved her because she was the first grandchild.

Three days after she was born, her dad came to the hospital and begged me to take him back. He said he would stop lying to me and would look after me and our daughter. By the time Rita was nine months old, she was costing us a lot of money, and her dad’s wages as a motorcycle taxi driver were not enough. I therefore decided to go back to work in another factory near my family home. The factory employed more then a thousand workers. I worked about eight hours a day- six days a week for US $ 2 a day and I had to work longer hours if they told me to. I had to get up at 4.30 am and often did not get home until 10 pm. I earned about $130 a month but I was exhausted. If I was off for one day they took $5 from my wages.

Factory life is very hard, especially for women. We worked for peanuts until we dropped, and we never ate well, with just one hour a day break at midday. To go home and come back to the factory took about forty minutes, so I had to eat cheap food, which I bought outside the factory gates. This was dirty, of poor-quality and very unhealthy.

Although my partner gave me next to nothing from his wages, and all my wages went on looking after us and our daughter, he accused me of giving my wages to my family. When I denied this, he left me again. I stayed in the factory for another 3 months, then I got very depressed, I couldn’t work, and I decided to stop working there.

Soon after he came back and again asked if we could get back together, but I said, “no”. He nagged me until I agreed to live with him again. I went back to work in the factory for the third time.

I worked there a year, after which we split up again. I tried to commit suicide but even that didn’t seem to bother him. My family looked after me until I felt well. After all this I was totally fell fed up with the factory and my life. I had spent about seven years of my life there, and I decided to end factory life, and start a new one. I just wanted to start again and try to forget about the past.

My new job was a cashier in a bar. I worked from 7pm to 7am every night. I did not have time to look after my daughter, from whom I had never been apart before but because I needed the money I had to leave her with my mum. When I woke up late afternoon, she would say, “mum I miss you, can’t you stay with me tonight?”. I was very sad and told her, sorry I couldn’t, I had to work because of her.

I had been working about six months in the bar, when my ex-partner came back again, and I told him it was too late. I could take care of myself and my daughter. I was fed up with our life together. He left and never came back. He never came to see his daughter. I know she is sad about this, and she used to tell everyone that her dad is dead.

After we split up for good, my sister went to England with her partner and all our family took her to the airport and stayed there for about two hours until she left. When we got back home, we realised we had been burgled. I went straight to the place I had hidden some jewellery, bought during the four years I had worked in the factory before living with my partner – worth about $2000. It had gone. I was very sad. I had worked hard for nothing.

Life is a story, but this was not the end. I worked as a cashier for another year and I met a man from England. He is a good man, and very kind. We got married a year ago, and I now have a spouse visa, and can live in England until 2015, when I need to apply for another visa. My husband looks after me and my family. My daughter, Rita, who is now six years old, and my husband get on very well, and she now thinks of her new-step-father as her only father and calls him ‘papa’. Two months ago, she visited us for six weeks, and we are now waiting for the result of a settlement visa application for her.

An Asian factory worker who knew nothing about the world, I am now studying English and learning more and more about life every day. At last my life is good, and full of happiness and laughter.

© Lyka Thorn, 4th December 2013

Email: adav2011@yahoo.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Work

Work

THE POLITICS OF WORKERS’ INQUIRY CONFERENCE

May 2-3, 2013 @ University of Essex

http://ephemeraweb.org/conference/index.htm

Workers’ inquiry is an approach to and practice of knowledge production that seeks to understand the changing composition of labor and its potential for revolutionary social transformation. It is the practice of turning the tools of the social sciences into weapons of class struggle. Workers’ inquiry seeks to map the continuing imposition of the class relation, not as a disinterested investigation, but rather to deepen and intensify social and political antagonisms.

This conference brings together various aspects of workers’ inquiry, from its historical origins and development to contemporary mutations and adaptations of it within contemporary struggles. It will expand the terrain and form of workers’ inquiry, focusing on topics including inquiries into cultural labor and the service economy, geographies of class conflict, transformation in value production, and the limits to workers’ inquiry as a political/research method.

Presentations from:
Anna Curcio (University of Messina) 
Bianca Elzebaumer & Caterina Giuliani (Cantiere per pratiche non-affermative) 
Heidi Hasbrouck (Goldsmiths) 
Tolga Hepdincler (Bahcesehir University)
Funda Kaya (Bahcesehir University)
Asli Kayhan (Kocaeli University)
Michał Kozłowski, Janek Sowa, Kuba Szreder (Free/Slow University of Warsaw)
Alan W. Moore (ABC No Rio / Squatting Europe)
Frederick H. Pitts (University of Bath)
Kasparas Pocius (Lithuanian Culture Research Institute)
Gigi Roggero (University of Bologna)
M. Nedim Süalp (Marmara University)
Zeynep Tul Akbal Sualp (Bahcesehir University)
Jamie Woodcock (Goldsmiths)

For more information and to register send a message to conference@ephemeraweb.org.

Sponsored by ephemera and the Essex Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Economic Crisis

ECONOMISTS OF TOMORROW

13th Conference of the Association for Heterodox Economics

Call for Papers

6-9 July 2011
University of Trent Nottingham, UK

The Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Association for Heterodox Economics (AHE) will be held at Nottingham Trent University, UK from 6-9 July 2011.

In more than ten years the AHE has established a reputation as a major national and international forum for the discussion of alternatives to mainstream economics, and for the interdisciplinary and pluralistic nature of its discussions. It is also plays an ongoing role in strengthening the community of heterodox economists, and to the development of heterodox economic theories on various themes through the dissemination of ideas and arguments.

The esteem of the economics profession has reached an all-time low, in the wake of the global financial crisis that most economists failed to predict. In this context we have a particularly important role to play as heterodox economists, many of whom were well aware that the crisis was imminent and who also have a range of proposals for new stable and sustainable economic and social structures.

For 2011 the AHE Conference theme is Economists of Tomorrow. This reflects the fact that, the world over, we are focused on challenging the hegemonic domination of our profession by just one approach embedded in mainstream economics, the neoclassical approach. The clear failure of neoclassical economics to predict, explain or find solutions to the global financial and economic crises makes it vulnerable. It is our intention is to use this opportunity to further expand and strengthen the case for pluralism within the economics profession.

Particular topics of interest under this over-arching theme include: addressing the power structures of the profession such as the Research Excellence Framework, the Royal Economic Society and the ABS ranking of economics journals; pluralism in research and teaching; research evaluation; openness to innovation and creativity; and the relationships between economists and decision-makers. The 2011 Conference will have both refereed and non-refereed papers. All paper proposals should indicate whether the paper is intended to be refereed or not.

A feature of the AHE is as a pluralist forum for dialogue. 
Consequently, the conference will also provide a broad pluralistic and interdisciplinary forum to discuss issues that members of the AHE and others feel are important. To gain an idea of the sorts of topics and issues that may be of interest to participants please see the details of the AHE conference 2010 at http://eitherwww.hetecon.org or http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/hetecon/conference/2010/

The international character of the conference has been a vital factor in its growing success. Scholars requiring documentation in support of visa or funding applications should indicate this at the time of submitting an abstract or panel proposal. Conference registration fees, all transportation and accommodation costs are at the expense of participants. Nevertheless, the AHE Conference Steering Committee is able to allocate some limited funding to assist participants from outside the US and European Union whose proposal is accepted. If you wish to apply for help with your conference costs please contact the organising committee (AHEConference@ntu.ac.uk).

The conference language is English.

Details regarding submission and registration

The conference invites submissions for single papers, panels and sessions of relevance to the over-arching conference theme or address topics or issues of importance to heterodox economics from standpoints which differ from, or critically examine, mainstream economics.

To facilitate dialogue and timetabling, participants whose papers are accepted must register by Sunday 12 June 2011. All participants will be expected to take part in at least two full days of the conference, in order to be included in the final programme. Participants should also be prepared to serve as discussants and/or session chairs. 

Further registration details will be announced later.

Single papers
All participants including those proposed for sessions and themes must submit an abstract to the conference website at http://www.hetecon.org. The abstract, which must be no longer than one page, should include a brief informative title, a clear statement of the issue the proposed paper will address, its main points, and its argument. Your abstract must state if you wish your paper to be considered for a theme and if you require it to be refereed. You must provide contact and affiliation details for all authors. If your paper is submitted in the name of more than one author, please indicate who will receive correspondence. The authors of successful abstracts will be notified and must provide a complete paper, unless the proposal is to be taken in a poster session, by the deadline for papers (see below). Both papers and abstracts must either be in Word or PDF format.

Complete sessions
The AHE welcomes proposals for complete single sessions and encourages those which address a single topic or issue from a variety of viewpoints or disciplines. Session proposals should be sent to AHEconference@ntu.net and should include:
* A short title (no more than 5 words),
* A description of the session which should be no more than one page
* The names of the proposed participants in the session
* An abstract for each paper to be included in the session
* The name and email address of the session organiser.

Themes
We encourage proposals for themes which address a single topic or issue from a variety of viewpoints or disciplines. The conference committee will work with theme organisers, when constructing the conference programme, to construct a coherent list of sessions for the theme, and schedule these so that participants can follow the theme. 

Theme proposals should be sent to AHEConference@ntu.net and should include:
* A short title (no more than 5 words),
* A short description of the type of paper that would be suitable for inclusion in the theme, and
* The name and email address(es) of the theme organiser(s).

Themes, once agreed by the conference committee, will be posted on the website along with contact details for theme organisers up until the closing date for papers. When submitting paper proposals, authors will be invited to indicate for which theme, if any, they consider it suitable. Theme organisers will be asked to consider all such submissions for inclusion.

Poster sessions
Poster sessions are intended to encourage new work by postgraduate or postdoctoral students, will depend on the number of submissions, and will be announced nearer the date of conference. If you wish your paper to be presented in a poster session, you need not provide a complete paper.

Deadlines

Proposal for panels are to be submitted by Sunday 14 November 2011.
Proposals for sessions are to be submitted by Sunday 30 January 2011.
Abstracts for all papers—to be included in a panel, theme or general conference session, and poster sessions—are to be submitted by Sunday 30 January 2011.

The AHE Committee will consider all proposals and abstracts and will notify you of the acceptance or rejection of your proposal.

Panel proposals will be notified by Monday 29 November 2011.
Session proposals will be notified by Monday 14 February 2011.
Paper proposals will be notified by Monday 14 February 2011.

Refereed papers are to be submitted by Sunday 15 May 2011.
Non-refereed papers are to be submitted by Sunday 29 May 2011.

Those submitting refereed and non-refereed papers must register, for a minimum of two days of the conference, by Sunday 12th June 2011. 
Registration details will be announced later.

All proposals, abstracts and papers are to be submitted via the AHE website: http://www.hetecon.org

All queries relating to the conference, but not concerning the submission of proposals or papers, should be addressed to: Bruce Philp (AHEConference@ntu.ac.uk).

To keep up to date with the 2011 conference and other AHE activities, subscribe to the AHE-ANNOUNCE mailing list (http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=AHE-ANNOUNCE) and visit http://www.open.ac.uk/socialsciences/hetecon/conference/2010/ or http://www.hetecon.org. Earlier conferences can also be found at http://www.hetecon.com
 
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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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