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Test Dept

Test Dept

FUEL TO FIGHT DS30: TEST FILM & BOOK EVENT

June 13 @ 6PM, firstsite, Colchester: http://www.firstsite.uk.net/page/fuel-to-fight-ds30-test-dept-film-book-event
Followed by party at the Waiting Room
The legendary London industrial noise musicians Test Dept are presenting a special screening of their film DS30 at the firstsite on the 13 June.

Marking 30 years since the 1984-5 miners’ strike, DS30 is a political collage of sound and image. The film is set within the monumental structural lines of Dunston Staiths built on the River Tyne in 1893 to ship coal from the Durham coalfields to the world. Featuring footage of mining communities and industry along the River Tyne and of the wider mining community together with footage and sounds from Test Dept’s own archive related to the strike, DS30 reflects on the group’s nationwide Fuel to Fight Tour in support of the miners, during which they collaborated with local activists and mining communities. These included Kent miner Alan Sutcliffe, who performed as writer and guest vocalist on live and recorded material and the South Wales Striking Miners’ Choir, with whom they recorded the album ‘Shoulder to Shoulder’ to raise money for the Miners’ Hardship Fund.

This screening of DS30 is accompanied by a selection of archive material of the group on film and video and will be followed by a Q & A with founding member Paul Jamrozy, who will be joined by Peter Webb (from PC Press), and Stevphen Shukaitis (from the University of Essex).

This event also celebrates the release of the book Total State Machine, a major historical document and visual representation of Test Dept, published by PC-Press. There will be a launch event following the screening.

Test Dept formed in the decaying docklands of South London in late 1981. The group made raw, visceral music out of re-purposed scrap metal and machinery scavenged from industrial waste-ground and derelict factories; a percussive sound with a political edge performed live against monumental slide and film projections in recently abandoned industrial spaces. Drilling, pounding, grinding, metal bashing – a Constructivist/Futurist-inspired soundtrack to the death throes of industrial Britain.

SCHEDULE
6:00 PM Doors Open
6:15-7:15: Film screening
7:15-8:00 Discussion with Test Department
8:00-11:00 Move to Waiting Room for drinks, DJs

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/695456000563749/

Stevphen Shukaitis

Autonomedia Editorial Collective

http://www.autonomedia.org

http://www.minorcompositions.info

images (2)

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Labour

Labour

REFRAMING LABOUR AND WORKERS’ RESISTANCE FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Call for Papers

Working USA special issue

Issue Editors:

Maurizio Atzeni, Loughborough University, UK; m.atzeni@lboro.ac.uk

Immanuel Ness, Brooklyn College, CUNY, New York City; manny.ness@gmail.com

Interpretations of global labour in the age of neoliberal capitalism urgently demands robust and critical historical and comparative analysis. For decades, research on labour collective organisation has focused almost exclusively on workers collectively employed on a stable basis in industrial settings or in the public sector, defended by collective bargaining, represented by trade unions and inserted within relatively stable systems of industrial relations. This view however it has always failed to take into account the transformative potentialities of that vast, rich and meaningful array of ‘precarious’ work experiences and relations that allow the production and re-production of capital as a whole.

Women’s labour in the sphere of social reproduction, low-waged workers who work outside conventional work as subcontractors in global production chains or in the informal economy of the global cities or as crowd workers in the digital economy, migrant workers whose exploited work often lays at the margin of legality, new groups of dispossessed people forced into the labour market, are categories of workers traditionally excluded and neglected by the labour relations literature as labourers; often considered unproductive, unregulated, and thus unrepresentable. Considering the speed of development and intensity of integration of global capitalist processes and the political turn to neoliberalism, which have brought about new (or refreshed old) paradigms to increase workers’ productivity and profits, absent has been the signal importance of these ‘invisible’, precarious workers, today representing not just the vast majority of workers in the global South but also increasingly shaping the social landscape of cities across the world.

Broadening research on this underworld of precarious and not represented workers is important to understand one fundamental dimension of the process of capital accumulation in the global age but it also helps to address deep theoretical concerns, put in evidence by heterodox Marxist currents across the social sciences, originating from the use of narrow conceptions about work and workers:

  • The conventional notion of the working class, based on the industrial, waged worker, has been questioned for not considering how different labour regimes co-exist and contribute to the development of capitalism as a system, especially women engaged in social reproduction.
  • The social organisation and militancy of workers it has been reduced to workers’ resistance to official strikes organised by representative trade unions, the ‘institutionalised form of resistance’, leaving aside the rich history and tradition of workers’ self-organisation. This remains crucial today in framing precarious workers organisation and in setting possibilities for transformative agency.
  • Geographically research concentrated on struggles at the workplace without considering the linkages of these with broader struggles over workers’ daily lives.

In the past 30 years, one sided views of labour has been explicitly based on the political role assigned to the industrial workers. Either from a revolutionary or a reformist perspective this particular section of the working class was considered central to any transformative politics. The advent of neoliberalism has swept away many of the elements upon which this centrality was built, leaving a tabula rasa, politically and theoretically speaking. From an empirical point of view, diversity, heterogeneity, unevenness, unpredictability characterise most workers’ struggles of the 21st century.

Against this theoretical and empirical gap in knowledge, the aim of this special issue is twofold.

It aims to offer insights on the daily lives, organization and resistance of precarious workers, intending these in broader terms, as employed in a range of different sectors, geographical and spatial landscapes, economic environments, and regulatory employment regimes.

It aims to produce new knowledge into the connections between these different workers’ struggles and the specific socio-economic, historical and productive context in which have developed.

Within these aims and considering the scope of the journal, we seek submissions from any social sciences discipline concerned with the study of workers and labour using a range of empirical and methodological analyses. The editors however would especially welcome papers that reach theoretical insights in addressing the relevance of certain groups of workers’ experiences or develop their arguments through comparative/historical analysis; focus on global cities and diverse employment regimes, workplaces and daily lives experiences; consider the experiences of workers in strategic sectors of the economy (distribution, transportation, knowledge economy); search for connections of workers struggles in different locations across the global production chain;  or offer insights on new forms of organizing and resistance

 

DUE DATE FOR ABSTRACTS OF 750-1000 WORDS: 15 September 2014

WORD LENGTH: 6000-10,000 words

DUE DATE FOR FINAL SUBMISSION: end March 2015

PUBLICATION DATE: September 2015

INCLUDE NAME, AFFILIATION

WE ENCOURAGE PHD STUDENTS AND ESTABLISHED SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-reframing-labour-and-workers2019-resistance-for-the-21st-century

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Marx Memorial Library

Marx Memorial Library

MARX MEMORIAL LIBRARY: POLITICAL ECONOMY FOR TRADE UNIONISTS

There is a series of four classes entitled Political Economy for Trade Unionists taking place in April and May as follows:

 

Tuesday 29 April – Today’s Capitalist Crisis: Banks, Profits, Wages and Austerity

Tutor:  Jonathan White

 

Tuesday 6 May – The Assault on the Workplace: Rights, Conditions and Pay

Tutor: John McGee

 

Tuesday 13 May – The Law and Industrial Relations

Tutor: John Hendy QC

 

Tuesday 20 May – The Assault on Democratic Rights: The threat to labour’s collective voice

Tutor:  Professor Marj Mayo

 

All classes begin at 6.30 in the Lecture Hall at the Library.  The Registration fee for four classes is £12.

 

Dr Laura Miller

Administrator

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

(Tel)  0207 253 1485

(Web site) http://www.marx-memorial-library.org

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Work

THE MEANINGS OF WORK

Now Out!

The Meanings of Work: Essay on the Affirmation and Negation of Work
Ricardo Antunes

The Meanings of Work aims to explore some dimensions of the changes taking place in the labour-world, as well as looking at the consequences, theoretical and empirical, entailed by these transformations, such as the relevance and pertinence of the category of labour in the contemporary world. Billions of men and women depend exclusively on their labour to survive and encounter increasingly unstable, precarious or casual workers and the unemployed. As the contingent of workers has grown, there have been a vast reduction in jobs, rights have been corroded and the gains of the past have been eroded. The Meanings of Work starts with a wider conception of work and seeks to understand this new condition of labour today. 

Biographical note
Ricardo Antunes is Professor of Sociology at University of Campinas (UNICAMP/Brazil). He was Visiting Research Fellow at Sussex University and his books and articles has been published in France, Italy, England, Swiss, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, among other countries.

Readership
It will be of interest to sociologists, economists, social workers, psychologists and for all those interested in recent changes in the global configuration of work.

Table of Contents

Foreword by István Mészáros
Preface to the English edition
Preface to the second edition
Preface to the first edition

Introduction

1. Capital’s Social-Metabolic Order and its System of Mediations
The system of first-order mediations
The emergence of the system of second-order mediations

2. Dimensions of the Structural Crisis of Capital
The crisis of Fordism and Taylorism as the phenomenal expression of the structural crisis

3. The Responses of Capital to its Structural Crisis: Productive Restructuring and its Repercussions in the Labour-Process
The limits of Taylorism/Fordism and of the social-democratic compromise
The emergence of mass worker-revolts and the crisis of the welfare-state

4. Toyotism and the New Forms of Capital-Accumulation
The fallacy of ‘total quality’ under the diminishing utility-rate of the use-value of commodities
The ‘lyophilisation’ of organisation and labour in the Toyotist factory: new forms of labour-intensification

5. From Thatcher’s Neoliberalism to Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’: the Recent British Experience
Neoliberalism, the world of work and the crisis of unionism in England
Elements of productive restructuring in Britain: ideas and practice
British strikes in the 1990s: forms of confrontation with neoliberalism and the casualisation of work
New Labour and Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’

6. The Class-that-Lives-from-Labour: the Working Class Today
Towards a broader notion of the working class
Dimensions of the diversity, heterogeneity and complexity of the working class
The sexual division of labour: transversalities between the dimensions of class and gender
Wage-earners in the service-sector, the ‘third sector’ and new forms of domestic labour
Transnationalisation of capital and the world of work

7. The World of Labour and Value-Theory: Forms of Material and Immaterial Labour
The growing interaction between labour and scientific knowledge: a critique of the thesis of ‘science as primary productive force’
The interaction between material and immaterial labour
Contemporary forms of estrangement

8. Excursus on the Centrality of Labour: the Debate between Lukács and Habermas
1. The centrality of labour in Lukács’s Ontology of Social Being
Labour and teleology
Labour as the model of social practice
Labour and freedom

2. Habermas’s critique of the ‘paradigm of labour’
The paradigm of communicative action and the sphere of intersubjectivity
The uncoupling of system and lifeworld
The colonisation of the lifeworld and Habermas’s critique of the theory of value

3. A critical sketch of Habermas’s critique
Authentic and inauthentic subjectivity

9. Elements towards an Ontology of Everyday Life

10. Working Time and Free Time: towards a Meaningful Life Inside and Outside of Work

11. Foundations of a New Social-Metabolic Order

Appendices

Appendices to the second edition
1. Ten Theses and a Hypothesis on the Present (and Future) of Work
2. Labour and Value: Critical Notes 

Appendices to the first edition
1. The Crisis of the Labour-Movement and the Centrality of Labour Today
2. The New Proletarians at the Turn of the Century
3. The Metamorphoses and Centrality of Labour Today
4. Social Struggles and Socialist Societal Design in Contemporary Brazil

References

See: http://www.brill.com/meanings-work

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-the-meanings-of-work.-essay-on-the-affirmation-and-negation-of-work-ricardo-antunes

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

 

WORKERS OF THE WORLD: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICT
Workers of the World – International Journal of Strikes and Social Conflict is a peer-reviewed academic journal in the English language, for which manuscripts may be submitted in Spanish, French, English, Italian and Portuguese. Workers of the World publishes original articles, interviews and book reviews in the field of labour history and social conflicts in an interdisciplinary, global, long term historical and non Eurocentric perspective.

It publishes articles about crisis, working classes, internationalism, unions, organization, peasants, women, memory, propaganda and media, methodology, theory, protest, strikes, slavery, comparative studies, statistics, revolutions, cultures of resistance, race, among other subjects.

 

The editors of the journal are:

– Alvaro Bianchi – Arquivo Edgard Leuenroth, UNICAMP (Brazil),  abianchi@unicamp.br

– Andreia Galvão – Arquivo Edgard Leuenroth, UNICAMP (Brazil),  agalvao@unicamp.br

– Marcel van der Linden* – International Institute of Social History,Amsterdam, (The Netherlands), mvl@iisg.nl

– Raquel Varela – Instituto de História Contemporânea, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal),

– Serge Wolikow – Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Université de Bourgogne,Dijon, (France),

– Sjaak van der Velden – Independent researcher,Rotterdam, (The Netherlands),  

– Xavier Domènech Sampere – Centre d’Estudis sobre les Èpoques Franquista i Democràtica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain),

 

Website: http://www.workeroftheworldjournal.net/

 
Articles should be sent, according to the instructions for authors, to the executive editor António Simões do Paço at workersoftheworld2012@yahoo.co.uk

 

Editorial statement

The first issue of Workers of the World. International Journal on Strikes and Social Conflict will appear online at the end of June 2012. The journal is an important step to consolidate the initiative, decided on at the Lisbon Labour Conference in March 2011, of creating an international association of researchers and institutions involved in the study of this subject.

The working class repeatedly continues to make its presence known and by doing so refutes the pessimistic predictions about the end of social conflicts that were popular in past decades. Different forms of popular struggle emerged in response to deteriorating living conditions, precarious employment of labour, and the change or elimination of social and labour protection legislation. In addition to the renewed labour movement in its classical forms of collective action and organization through strikes and unions, we saw the emergence or re-creation of movements of the unemployed or underemployed, of the landless and the homeless, just to mention some of the most widely known.

Despite numerous attempts to theoretically declare the end of social classes, strikes, and social movements, the inherent social contradictions in society and workers’ own actions constitute imposing evidence to the contrary. Industrial conflicts repeatedly have intersected with other social conflicts and ethnic, gender and generational issues complexity and renew interest in collective action, bringing in new theoretical and analytical challenges to researchers.

Workers of the World: International Journal on Strikes and Social Conflict aims to be innovative. This journal aims to stimulate global studies on labour and social conflicts in an interdisciplinary, global, long term historical and non Eurocentric perspective. It intends to move away from traditional forms of methodological nationalism and conjectural studies, adopting an explicitly critical and interdisciplinary perspective. Therefore, it will publish empirical research and theoretical discussions that address strikes and social conflicts in an innovative and rigorous manner. It will also promote dialogue between scholars from different fields and different countries and disseminate analyzes on different socio-cultural realities, to give visibility and centrality to this theme.

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Erik Olin Wright

Erik Olin Wright

ERIK OLIN WRIGHT ON WORKER-OWNED CO-OPERATIVES

Worker-owned Cooperatives: A niche in capitalism or a pathway beyond?

A lecture by Professor Erik Olin Wright, University of Wisconsin

5pm-6.30pm, Wednesday 23rd May, 2012

Lecture Theatre, Department of Politics and International Relations, 
Manor Road Building, Manor Road, Oxford

Worker-owned Cooperatives have an ambiguous relationship to capitalism as an economic system. On the one hand, worker coops constitute a distinctive organizational form that occupies a small niche compatible with a well-functioning capitalist economy. On the other hand, worker-owned and managed firms violate in fundamental ways the class character of capitalism by being organized on democratic egalitarian principles. This contradictory relationship between cooperatives and capitalism poses an important question for critics of capitalism: To what extent could worker cooperatives ever constitute a significant component of an alternative to capitalism?

This lecture, hosted jointly by Oxford University’s Centre for Mutual and Employee-owned BusinessPublic Policy Unit and Centre for the Study of Social Justice, will explore worker-owned cooperatives, as a case of what Wright terms ‘real utopias‘. It will feature a response by Prof Stuart White (Politics) and be chaired by Dr. Will Davies (Centre for Mutual and Employee-owned Business). 

No registration is required. Please email william.davies@kellogg.ox.ac.uk for any further details about this event.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Luddites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY & INTERNATIONAL THEORY – BISA WORKSHOP

BISA working group on Historical Sociology and IR
Centre for Advanced International Theory, University of Sussex

The Historical Sociology of International Theory
One day workshop
Thursday 13th September 2012

The discipline of International Relations is home to a wide range of theoretical approaches and its history is characterized by (metaphorical) debates and competition between these theories. This theoretical pluralism R11; deplored by some and celebrated by others – does not only concern the substantive claims of particular theories but also the conception of theory itself. This refers us back to debates in the philosophy of social science. What counts as theory, what role theory can and should play and how it best fulfils this task is not a settled question in IR.

Moreover, inasmuch as the emergence and development of different theories is strongly influenced by their historical and sociological context, the same is true for conceptions of theory itself. Hence, the  considerable recent changes within the international system – from the end of bipolarity, through the ideological hegemony of market democracy, radical fluctuation in the world economy, to open challenges to the institution of sovereignty – can be expected to affect the conception of theory (and consequently the development of theories) itself. This workshop seeks to explore the ways in which time and place impact on the conception of international theory and to develop an understanding of the nature of international theory and its implications at the beginning of the 21st century.

To this end, we invite papers that analyze the emergence, development, change and implications of conceptions of international theory from a historical sociological perspective. We are particularly, but not solely, interested in contributions that:

·  Reflect on the connection between time, place and conceptions of theory;
·  Provide an historical and sociological account of the development of conceptions of international theories;
·  Explore the implications of recent changes in the international system for conceptions of international theory;
·  And, conversely, investigate the impact of conceptions of international theory on our understanding of the broader historical and sociological context.

Those interested in presenting papers at the workshop should send brief abstracts (no more than 200 words) to: cait@sussex.ac.uk. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 13th June 2012.

BISA: http://www.bisa.ac.uk/

**END**

Luddites

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Austerity

CRITICAL LABOUR STUDIES 7th SYMPOSIUM

19th and 20th February 2011
Location: The Manchester Museum , The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester

PROGRAMME:

SATURDAY

9.00-9.30 – Registration

9.30 – 11.00 – Restructuring and Unions

‘Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Culture? Industrial Restructuring and Culture Change: The Strategic Response of Organised Labour’ – Discussion generated by Bill Gray, Convenor, (Tata, Corus UK, Scunthorpe) and Ian Greenwood, (Leeds University Business School, Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change, CERIC).

‘Changing union and management strategies in a context of restructuring, marketisation and privatisation – the CWU in Royal Mail’ – Stephen Mustchin, David Beale, (University of Manchester )

‘Milking the Masses for Inspiration’: The Outsourcing of Creative Labour by Apple and Google’ Birgitta Bergvall-Kåreborn (Luleå University of Technology) Debra Howcroft (University of Manchester)

11.00-11.15. Coffee and Tea

11.15-12.15 Migration, Exploitation and Labour

‘Networks of Support for New Migrant Communities: Institutional Goals versus Substantive Goals?’ Robert MacKenzie, Chris Forde and Zinovijus Ciupijus, (Leeds University Business School)

‘Lets get back to normal’? Migrant workers, sectarianism and some problems with the labour movement in the north of Ireland ” Brian Garvey, Paul Stewart, Jolanta Kulinska, Sherley Dolo, Andrius Cislikaukas

12.15 – 1.00 Lunch

1.00-2.00 Activism and New Agendas in the Current Climate

‘Who is The Activist?   Biographies of worker activists from the North East’ John Stirling (University of Northumbria) and Jo McBride (University of Bradford), Discussant: Shirley Winter

‘Prevailing languages of class – fairness and equality in trade union discourse’ Sian Moore (London Metropolitan University)

2.00-3.00 – Communities, Renewal and the Worker Representation

‘Active unions, active communities: a local example of trade union/community engagement’ Jane Holgate CERIC Leeds University and John Page, Secretary of Hackney Unite

‘The Role of Trades Councils’ Geoff Brown Secretary of Manchester Trades Council

‘Developing the Trade Union Branch: the case of the UCU’ Beverley Woodburn UCU

3.00-3.30 Coffee and Tea

3.30 – 4.30 Politics, Academics and Worker Struggle

‘The BA Dispute in 2010’ – Speaker from UNITE BASSA

‘Objective but Not Detached: In Defence of Partisanship in Employment Relations Research’ Professor Ralph Darlington University of Salford

4.30 Book Launch

Tommy McKearney IWU – organized labour and politics in Northern Ireland ‘From Insurrection to Parliament’ (Pluto Books)

5.30 CLOSE OF DAY

SUNDAY

9.00-9.30 Coffee and Tea

9.30-10.45 Left Behind: Young Workers

‘Young workers in crisis’ – three presentations – Lef Kretsos (Coventry University), Mel Simms, Manuela Galetto (Warwick University)

‘Emerging prospects and constraints on getting labour history into the schools: a US perspective’ Anthony Tambureno (West Virginia University)

10.45-12.00 Internationalism and Work

‘International Political Economy of Work and Employability‘ Phoebe Moore, Salford University

‘Flexicurity and atypical employment as integrated parts of the new neoliberal employment agenda: a view from Greece and the European South.’ Stelios Gialis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

‘China and the International Labour Movement’, Charles Umney, University of Leeds

12.00-12.30 LUNCH

12.30 -2.00 – The End of the Public and Free University Britain ?

Cases from the frontline: UWE (Andy Danford, UWE) and Sian Moore (London Metropolitan),

Discussion

2.00- 3.00 CLS Meeting

Finish 3.00

Organisers: Jane Holgate, Debra Howcroft, Miguel Martinez Lucio, and Jo McBride
Contact: miguel.martinezlucio@manchester.ac.uk, or debra.howcroft@mbs.ac.uk

Cheques for £60 (waged) or £40 (unwaged) (which includes all food and refreshments) should be made out to ‘Critical Labour Studies’ and sent to Miguel Martinez Lucio (staff), Manchester University , PMO Division, Manchester Business School, Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB.

Please do confirm you are coming so we can plan the catering and support

For Updates, Changes and Accommodation Links Check – http://criticallabourstudies.org.uk/site  
For Hotels in Manchester you can try: http://www.booking.com/city/gb/manchester.html
Manchester Business School has some cheaper accommodation: http://www.mbs.ac.uk/aboutus/conference-hotel/hotel-services.aspx

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Globalization

TRASNATIONAL LABOUR

Bieler, Andreas and Ingemar Lindberg (eds.) (2010)

Global Restructuring, Labour and the Challenges for Transnational Solidarity 
London: Routledge.

ISBN 978-0-415-58083-0.

Globalisation has put national labour movements under severe pressure due to the increasing transnationalisation of production and informalisation of the economy.

Through a range of different case studies of concrete instances of successful as well as failed strategies, this book draws out possibilities of, but also obstacles to, transnational labour solidarity in times of global restructuring. It covers inter-trade union co-operation as well as co-operation between trade unions and social movements within the formal and informal economy, and the public and private sector.

This book will be of interest to students and scholars of International Political Economy, International Relations, Industrial Relations, Globalisation, Geography and History, as well as trade union researchers and social movement activists.

More information is available on the publisher’s website at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415580830/

A flyer of the book offering a 20% discount can be found at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~ldzab/Transnational%20Solidarity%20flyer.pdf

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No Future

WORK EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY CONFERENCE 2010

British Sociological Association

Work, Employment and Society Conference 2010

Tuesday 7th – Thursday 9th September 2010

Brighton Dome and the University of Brighton

The early booking deadline for the BSA Work, Employment and Society Conference is approaching. Bookings received after 1st August incurs a £50 late fee.

Conference Theme: Managing Uncertainty: A New Deal?

Plenary speakers:

– Eileen Appelbaum (Rutgers, USA)

– Claus Offe (Berlin)

– Jennifer Klein (Yale, USA)

– Chris Tilly (UCLA, USA)

– Michel Lallement (Paris)

– David Lane (Cambridge)

– Pun Ngai (Hong Kong)

– Jill Rubery (Manchester)

– Premilla D’Cruz and Ernesto Noronha (Ahmedabad)

– Enrique de la Garza Toledo (Mexico)

– Analias Torres (Lisbon)

– Endre Sik (Budapest)

– Colette Fagan (Manchester)

For more information and to book online  please visit www.britsoc.co.uk/events/WES or email any enquiries to conference@britsoc.org.uk

Book now! We hope to see you at the conference in Brighton in September!

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Strike

Strike

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

 

 

A message from Sjaak van der Velden: svv@iisg.nl

Call for Papers
International Conference
Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The Institute of Contemporary History (New University of Lisbon), the International Institute of Social History (Amsterdam), The Archive Edgard Leuenroth (Unicamp/Brasil), the Centre for the Study of Spain under Franco and Democracy (Autonomous University of Barcelona) and the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (France) start the call for papers for the International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century that will take place in Lisbon between 17 and 19 March 2011.
The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee:
Alvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domïnech (CEDIF)

Calendar:
Papers submission:   January 2010 – 30th June 2010
Notification of acceptance:  July 30th, 2010
Papers:  December 15th, 2010
Conference: March, 17-19, 2011

Important: The deadline for delivery of completed papers/articles is 15th December 2010. For reasons of translation no papers will be accepted after this date. The paper should be no longer than 4000 words (including spaces) in times new roman, 12, line space 1,5. For Registration Form see below.

Conference Languages: Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program: The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Alvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Domïnech. During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Prof. Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Thusday-17/03/11 Friday-18/03/11

Saturday-19/03/11
9:00 – 11:00 Opening Conference Sessions
Excursion: Lisbon of the revolutions (guide by Prof. Fernando Rosas)
11:15 – 13:15 Sessions  Sessions Sessions
13:15 � 14:30  Lunch Lunch Lunch
14:30 � 16:30 Sessions Sessions Sessions
16:45 � 18:45 Sessions Sessions Sessions
19:30 Debate: Movies and Working class in the twentieth century.
Debate: “The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it”. Crisis and Social Change.
21:00

Dinner (Uai)

Dinner (Portug�lia)

Dinner (Casa do Alentejo)

Conference Fees
Fees including dinners and excursion Lisbon of the Revolutions: 80 euros
Fees without dinners and excursion: free
Entrance free

Presidents/Research directors of the Institutes
Fernando Rosas (IHC)
Fernando Teixeira da Silva (AEL)
Marcel van der Linden (IISH)
Pere Y Solanes (CEDIF)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)

Registration form/Papers Submission
International Conference
Strikes and Social Conflicts around the World in the Twentieth Century
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

For Registration/Papers Submission fill out this registration form and send it to ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

First Name:  Family Name:

Position: Professor/ Associate Professor/ Assistant Professor/ Lecturer/ Ph.D Candidate/ Postgraduate/ Independent Researcher etc..

University/Organization/Job:
Detailed Post Address (Important!):
City: 

Country:

Postcode:
Telephone: Mobile (Important): Email (Important):

Paper Title: Abstract (max 200 words)

Contact information:
Instituto de Hist�ria Contempor�nea/ Faculdade de Ci�ncias Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Av. de Berna, 26 C
1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal
E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

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Work, work, work

Work, work, work

WORK ORGANISATION, LABOUR AND GLOBALISATION

 

 Volume 3 No 1 of ‘Work Organisation, Labour and Globalisation’ is now available and is entitled ‘Working at the Interface: call-centre labour in a global economy’

Call centres illustrate the consequences of globalisation for labour perhaps more clearly than any other form of employment. Call-centre workers sit at the interface between the global and the local, having to transcend the limitations of local time zones, cultures and speech patterns. They are also at the interface between companies and their customers, having to absorb the impact of anger, incomprehension, confusion and racist abuse whilst still meeting exacting productivity targets and staying calm and friendly.

Finally, they take the brunt of the conflict at the contested interface between production and consumption, having to deal in their personal lives with the conflicts between the demands of paid and unpaid work. Drawing, amongst others, on organisational theory, sociology, communications studies, industrial relations, economic geography, gender theory and political economy, this important collection brings together survey evidence from around the world with case studies and vivid first-hand accounts of life in call centres from Asia, North and South America, Western and Eastern Europe. In the process it reveals many similarities but also demonstrates that national industrial relations traditions and workers’ ability to negotiate can make a significant difference to the quality of working life in call  centres.

Contributors include:
Ursula Holtgrewe, Jessica Longen, Hannelore Mottweiler, Annika Schönauer, Premilla D’Cruz, Ernesto Noronha, Simone Wolff, Claudia Mazzei Nogueira, Enda Brophy, Norene Pupo, Andrea Noack, Pia Bramming, Ole H. Sørensen, Peter Hasle, Päivi Korvajärvi, Vassil Kirov, Kapka Mircheva, and Ursula Huws.
____________

Available in print and online
Read free taster article online at: http://analytica.metapress.com/content/c72128810j7357u3/fulltext.pdf

Order in book form from: http://www.merlinpress.co.uk/acatalog/WORKING_AT_THE_INTERFACE.html

For further information go to http://www.analyticapublications.co.uk

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