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Education

DISCOURSE, POWER & RESISTANCE IN EDUCATION – CONFERENCE 2013

Discourse, Power, Resistance: DPR 13      

DISCOURSES OF INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION
9 – 11 April, 2013 – University of Greenwich, United Kingdom

Power can be a wonderful thing, as Terry Eagleton told the DPR conference in 2008: wonderful and essential for the achievement of our best and most generous purposes. But it can also be abused.

A widespread abuse of power is to organise the social world into groups that are included and others that are excluded, using the discourse of the powerful group, like subtly barbed wire, to distinguish the insiders from the outsiders on the grounds of gender, ethnicity, age, wealth, sexuality, class and other grouping. Communities may then disintegrate. The excluded members may seek to be admitted to the privileged group by learning and adopting its discourse; or they may resist this assimilation and celebrate their difference in defiant counter-cultures of their own.

What is the scope of research, learning and teaching in this contested space? What knowledges and methodologies should be included or excluded, and why? These are the issues the conference will consider.

Exchanging words and papers is a powerful academic practice at the heart of DPR. But the conference is about the discourses of inclusion and exclusion, so images, music, performance, display, story-telling – the variously imaginative ways of sharing our understanding – must have their space. DPR13 will include the contributions of the creative and performing arts so that the conference tells and shows a freshly inclusive vision.

Preparations and plans for DPR13 are already well under way with over 60 abstracts accepted and more coming in daily. The Second Call for Papers is Friday 21 December. This is not a deadline but we strongly encourage delegates planning to offer papers, workshops, posters or exhibition work to send abstracts as soon as possible. Details of 12 projects and seminars already in preparation are posted on the website.

Further proposals are being developed and will be posted soon. For further information or to discuss ideas, please contact Jerome Satterthwaite by email at jnsatterthwaite@gmail.com

Conference website for full details and registration: dprconference.com

Power and Education journal: www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER

 

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Taking to the Streets

RETURN TO THE STREET

27-28 June 2012
Goldsmiths, University of London

A two day conference exploring the shifting role of the street as discourse and real physical space in the context of contemporary culture and politics

Identity formation and public debate do not simply occur online or through new media technologies. As the recent excessive imprisonment of those involved in the UK riots this summer demonstrated, the control and regulation of real bodies within real spaces is still very much at stake. Within the context of riots, protests and occupations in the UK and worldwide – the street appears to have become once more the space where people gather to be heard and counted. Considering this ‘return’ (although it is questionable whether we every really left the street) how might a line be drawn between the type of discourse which pays lip service to banal, neoliberal fetishised notions of street as site and object of subversive cool – incorporating graffiti, fashion, skateboarding, hiphop – and a more critical and engaged examination of processes of exclusion, confrontation and violence which constitute the everyday reality of life on and in the street. The street is and should not simply be flagged up as a site where power relations are toyed with as part of an ongoing Damien Hirst-meets-Banksyesque flirtation between public and private space. Such fetishisation ignores or glosses over notions of territory, surveillance and fear.

Yet at every moment attempts to challenge existing power structures from within the space of the street are at risk of being recuperated in the service of bourgeois, neoliberal modes of consumption. The return to pedestrianised zones in major European cities is frequently part of gentrification processes and occurs within privately owned spaces with the aim of encouraging consumerism rather than increased social interaction precluded by motorised city spaces. The festival atmosphere at protests and occupations might also be considered not simply as a means of creating greater solidarity amongst participants but as embodying a Bakhtinian form of carnival in which the political impetus of the event or movement exhausts itself in a media circus of spectacle and rhetoric staged between protestors and law-enforcement. Similarly, how does the crowd or the collective end up reproducing existing forms of exclusion in claiming to speak for the masses as a homogeneous whole? Those whose access to the street is already restricted due to race, gender or disability must frequently concede their voices to those for whom the street is taken for granted as usable, occupiable and negotiable space. At the same time, a more critical stance is needed towards both the romanticisation and demonization of the crowd in public space. It is, for example, naive to think that issues such as the systemic street harassment of women in Cairo disappeared completely during the occupation of Tahrir Square yet this was the rhetoric widely presented. Conversely, how might the pervasive politics of fear which posits the crowd as unruly mob or herd, keeping people off the streets, through the imposition of curfews and devices like the mosquito be redressed? What needs to be done to encourage greater mobilisation on the street from different groups and individuals?

The aim of this conference is to rethink the street both in terms of its radical potential as site where dissent, critique and change can all be achieved whilst remaining critical as to the limits of such radicality. Where does the street lead us and what happens off the street? How might we avoid the dead ends and turf wars involved both in conceptualising and using the street? How might we set about building a new politics of the street? We welcome proposals for papers, discussions, short films, mini-workshops and other interventions engaging with the above issues and questions.

Topics might include but are not limited to:
– street as fetish object
– societies of discipline and control
– inclusion/exclusion/exchange
– street as site of resistance/containment
– subversive potential/impotential of street art and fashion
– hiphop struggles and activism
– surveillance – cctv and self-mapping apps
– politics of the crowd
– negotiating the street – strategies and tactics
– territory/circulation
– politics of fear
– living and working on the street
– off the street

Abstracts/proposals of 300-500 words should be sent to: S.Fuggle@gold.ac.uk by 3 February 2012.

Programme will be confirmed in early March 2012.

Organised by the Centre for Cultural Studies with the generous support of the Department of Media and Communications, PACE and theGraduateSchool, Goldsmiths.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

TEAN

SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS: CHANGING PERSPECTIVES

Registration has now opened for this event.  Please circulate details of this event to anyone you feel this may be of interest to.

Special Educational Needs: Changing Perspectives

Friday, January 13th 2012

This workshop is presented by TEAN, the Teacher Education Advancement Network. TEAN’s aims for Teacher Education are: to enhance practice, to support and promote innovation and development, to contribute to and help build research capacity; to contribute to policy development and implementation.

Venue: University of Cumbria, Lancaster Campus

 

SEN concerns us all; how do we ensure that all children and young people reach their full potential and make a successful transition to adulthood? What is the level of awareness of student and practising teachers with respect to children and young people with Special Educational Needs? What are your perspectives regarding SEN? The overall aim of this day event is for you to discover tangible outcomes concerning what to do in teacher education to develop student teachers and thereby benefit children and young people. How could things be done differently? TEAN offers the time and space to consider this vital area of education and to benefit from collaboration with colleagues from across the sector. In morning and afternoon workshops you will work together following presentations which will challenge your thinking and suggest innovative practice. You will investigate different layers from teacher educators to students teachers – and by extension, practising teachers – to children and young people and feed back your ideas to delegates on the day and then, through the TEAN website, to the whole sector both at home and abroad.

Keynote speaker

TEAN is delighted to welcome Professor Lani Florian, Professor of Social Inclusion at the University Aberdeen to give the keynote address for the day. She has written extensively on inclusive education and has consulted on special needs education and inclusion internationally. Her research interests include categorisation of children, models of provision for meeting the needs of all learners, and teaching practice in inclusive schools (inclusive pedagogy).

To present ideas on innovative practice in the afternoon session TEAN gives a warm welcome to: Christopher Robertson who lectures and researches in the field of special and inclusive education at the University of Birmingham and was a member of  the reference group for the 2009 Lamb report; and to the successful team from the University of Cumbria who run one of the very few specialised undergraduate courses in SEN/inclusive practice and inclusive pedagogy: Alison Feeney, Anne Gager, Graham Hallett, Verna Kilburn, Kären Mills.

Who is it for?

This event will be appropriate for all Initial Teacher Educators from HEIs or schools, and all those with an interest in teacher education.

How to book:

Please reserve your place by completing the registration form which can be found at:  http://www.cumbria.ac.uk/AboutUs/Subjects/Education/Research/TEAN/DiaryOfEvents/SENEvent.aspx

This can also be accessed by going to www.tean.ac.uk  and going to the Diary of Events

Fee:  £90                     

Please note that our preferred method of payment is by credit/debit card although alternative methods of payment are available.

Closing date for registrations: 19th December 2011

For queries about the workshop content contact: alison.jackson@cumbria.ac.uk  Telephone contact: 01524 385459 (internal 5759)

All other queries please contact TEAN admin at: tean@cumbria.ac.uk

If you would prefer not to receive e-mails concerning further events or TEAN activities from us in future please contact tean@cumbria.ac.uk

 

Kind regards

Helen Harling

 

TEAN
Teacher Education Advancement Network
University of Cumbria
Bowerham Road
Lancaster
LA1 3JD
Email: tean@cumbria.ac.uk 
Website: www.tean.ac.uk

 

Tel: 01524 384193 (internal 4193) Administrator.
Tel: 01524 385459 (internal 5759) Dr Alison Jackson

Administrator availability: Mon 8.30 – 4.00, Tues & Wed 9.00 – 4.30.

TEAN is The Teacher Education Advancement Network. Its aims for Teacher Education are: to enhance practice, to support and promote innovation and development, to contribute to and help build research capacity; to contribute to policy development and implementation.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Agency

AGENCY IN A CHANGING EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT

Just published at: http://www.wwwords.eu/eerj/content/pdfs/9/issue9_2.asp

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL
Volume 9 Number 2, 2010   ISSN 1474-9041

ECER KEYNOTES – VIENNA 2009

Stephen J. Ball. New Voices, New Knowledges and the New Politics of Education Research: the gathering of a perfect storm?

Roland Reichenbach. Two Solitudes: educational research and the pedagogical realm

Herbert Altrichter. Theory and Evidence on Governance: conceptual and empirical strategies of research on governance in education

SPECIAL ISSUE
AGENCY IN A CHANGING EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT: Negotiations, Collective Actions and Resistance
Guest Editors: ANNE-LISE ARNESEN, ELINA LAHELMA, LISBETH LUNDAHL & ELISABET ÖHRN

Anne-Lise Arnesen, Elina Lahelma, Lisbeth Lundahl & Elisabet Öhrn. Introduction. Agency in a Changing Educational Context: negotiations, collective actions and resistance

AGENCY

Kari Berg. Negotiating Identity: conflicts between the agency of the student and the official diagnosis of social workers and teachers

Jukka Lehtonen. Gendered Post-Compulsory Educational Choices of Non-Heterosexual Youth

Joakim Lindgren & Lisbeth Lundahl. Mobilities of Youth: social and spatial trajectories in a segregated Sweden

TEACHERS’ AND STUDENTS’ COLLECTIVE ACTIONS, NEGOTIATION AND RESISTANCE

Maria Rönnlund. Student Participation in Activities with Influential Outcomes: issues of gender, individuality and collective thinking in Swedish secondary schools

Ulpukka Isopahkala-Bouret. Vocational Teachers between Educational Institutions and Workplaces

Marianne Dovemark. Teachers’ Collective Actions, Alliances and Resistance within Neo-liberal Ideas of Education: the example of the Individual Programme

Carina Hjelmér, Sirpa Lappalainen & Per-Åke Rosvall. Time, Space and Young People’s Agency in Vocational Upper Secondary Education: a cross-cultural perspective

CHANGING CONTEXTS OF AGENCY

Ann-Sofie Holm. Gender Pattern and Student Agency: secondary school students’ perceptions over time

Katariina Hakala. Discourses on Inclusion, Citizenship and Categorizations of ‘Special’ in Education Policy: the case of negotiating change in the governing of vocational special needs education in Finland

Tove Steen-Olsen & Astrid Grude Eikseth. The Power of Time: teachers’ working day – negotiating autonomy and control

REVIEW ESSAY

Jörg Dinkelaker. Learning in the Knowledge Society and the Issue of Fundamental Change in Education: a comparative review

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2010 volume (this includes full access to ALL back numbers) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.eu/subscribeEERJ.asp

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Martin Lawn (m.lawn@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Archive

Archive

THE ARCHIVE AND EVERYDAY LIFE CONFERENCE
Call for Proposals:

”The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference
May 7-8, 2010
McMaster University

Confirmed Keynotes: Ann Cvetkovich (An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures), Angela Grauerholz (At Work and Play: A Web Experimentation), Ben Highmore (The Everyday Life Reader; Everyday Life and Cultural Theory), Michael O’Driscoll (The Event of the Archive)

This conference will bring together academics, advocates, artists, and other cultural workers to examine the intersecting fields of archive and everyday life theory. From Simmel through Mass Observation to contemporary Cultural Studies theorists, the objective of everyday life theory has been, as Ben Highmore writes, to “rescue the everyday from conventional habits of the mind…to attempt to register the everyday in all its complexities and contradictions.” Archive theory provides a means to explore these structures by “making the unfamiliar familiar,” hence opening the possibility of generating “new forms of critical practice.” The question of a politics of the archive is critical to the burgeoning field of archive theory. How do we begin to theorize the archive as a political apparatus? Can its effective democratization be measured by the participation of those who engage with both its constitution and its interpretation?

“Archive” is understood to cover a range of objects, from a museum’s collection to a personal photograph album, from a repository of a writer’s papers in a library to an artist’s installation of found objects. Regardless of its content, the archive works to contain, organize, represent, render intelligible, and produce narratives. The archive has often worked to legitimate the rule of those in power and to produce a historical narrative that presents class structure and power relations as both common-sense and inevitable. This function of the archive as a machine that produces History-telling us what is significant, valued, and worth preserving, and what isn’t-is enabled through an understanding of the archive as neutral and objective (and too banal and boring to be political!). The archive has long occupied a privileged space in affirmative culture, and as a result, the archive has been revered from afar and aestheticized, but not understood as a potential object of critical practice.

Can a dialogue between archive theory and everyday life theory work to “take revenge” on the archive (Cvetkovich)? If the archive works to produce historical narratives, can we seize the archive and its attendant collective consciousness as a tool for resistance in countering dominant History with resistant narratives? While the archive has worked to preserve a transcendental, “affirmative” form of culture, bringing everyday life theory into conversation with archive theory opens up the possibility of directing critical attention to both the wonders and drudgeries of the everyday. Archiving the everyday-revealing class structures and oppression on the basis of race and gender, rendering working and living conditions under global capitalism visible, audible, and intelligible-redirects us from our busyness and distractedness, and focuses our attention on that which has not been understood to be deserving of archiving. The archive provides the time and space to think through a collection of objects organized around particular set of interests. If the archive could grant us a space in which to examine everyday life, rather than sweeping it under the carpet as a trivial banality, we could begin to understand our conditions and develop the desire to change them.

How can we envision the archive as a site of ethics and/or politics? Does the archive simply represent a place to amass memory, or can it, following Benjamin, represent a site to make visible a history of the present, thus amassing fragments of the everyday, which can in turn be used to uproot the authority of the past to question the present? In short, what happens when we move beyond the archive as merely a collection and begin to theorize it as a site of constant renewal and struggle within which the past and present can come together? Furthermore, how then does the archive as an everyday practice allow us to understand or change our perception of temporality, memory, and this historical moment?

Areas of inquiry for submissions may include, but are not limited to, the following topics and questions:

* The archive both includes and excludes; it works to preserve while simultaneously doing violence. Are the acts of selection, collection, ordering, systematizing, and cataloguing inherently violent?
* The question of digitization: the internet as digital archive and the digitization of the physical archive. Digitizing the archive renders collections invisible and distant, yet increasingly searchable and quantifiable. Does the digitization of the archive reveal new ways of seeing persistent power structures? Or does it hide them?
* National and colonial archiving: questions of power and national identity. * The utopian, radical potential of the archive as well as its dystopian possibilities.
* Indigenous modes of archiving.
* Visibility and pedagogy: while the archive often works to hide, conceal, and store away, it can also reveal and display that which otherwise remains invisible. Do barriers to access restrict this emancipatory function of the archive?
* Questions of collective memory and nostalgia (for Benjamin, a retreat to a place of comfort through nostalgia is not a political act).
* The archive as revisionist history.
* The archive as a form of surveillance.
* The role of reflexivity with respect to the manner in which the archive is constructed/produced/curated.
* Function of the narrative form for the archive: how does the way in which the archive reveals its own constructedness unravel the concept of the archive as “historical truth”?
* The future of the archive: preservation and collection look forwards as well as into the past. How should we understand the hermeneutic function of the archive and the struggle over its interpretation?
* The relationship between the archive and the archivist/archon.
* Mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in the archive: who speaks and who is spoken for?
* The affective relationship between the archive and the body.

Following the conference, we intend to publish an edited collection of essays based on the papers presented at the conference to facilitate the circulation of ideas in this exciting field of inquiry.
 
“The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference will take place 7-8 May, 2010, sponsored by the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario (John Douglas Taylor Fund). The conference format will be diverse, including paper presentations, panels, round-table exchanges, artistic performances, and exhibitions.
We encourage individual and collaborative paper and panel proposals from across the disciplines and from artists and community members. 

Paper Submissions should include (1) contact information; (2) a 300-500 word abstract; and (3) a one page curriculum vitae or a brief bio.

Panel Proposals should include (1) a cover sheet with contact information for chair and each panelist; (2) a one-page rationale explaining the relevance of the panel to the theme of the conference; (3) a 300 word abstract for each proposed paper; and (4) a one page curriculum vitae for each presenter. 

Please submit individual paper proposals or full panel proposals via e-mail attachment by October 15, 2009 to tayconf@mcmaster.ca with the subject line “Archive.” Attachments should be in .doc or .rtf formats. Submissions should be one document (i.e. include all required information in one attached document).

Conference organizing committee: Mary O’Connor, Jennifer Pybus, and Sarah Blacker

Website: http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Taylor_2010/index.html

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Jammin for Inclusion: Benefit Concert for Communities Empowerment Network

Ms Dynamite, Bashy, Linton Kwesi-Johnson and Maroon Town come together at Brixton’s ‘Jamm’ on March 25th to celebrate and raise funds for the work of Communities Empowerment Network (CEN), a London based charity.
 
CEN has spent the last 10 years reintegrating excluded pupils back into mainstream education.  CEN deals with an average of 500 exclusion cases a year and has a virtually 100% success in reintegration.

In 2001, Martin Narey, then Director of the Prison Service, stated that ‘the 13,000 children being excluded from school each year might as well be given a ticket to join the prison system somewhere down the line’.  In just about every urban area in Britain, young black people are disproportionately represented in the prison system relative to their numbers in the local population.

Ms Dynamite, Bashy  and Linton Kwesi-Johnson
have put their name to this event because they want to highlight the success of CEN in getting permanently excluded pupils back into mainstream, full-time education as well as acknowledge the immense potential that exists in today’s youth by being on hand to meet and chat to young people.

 Ms Dynamite: R&B and hip song singer-rapper, Mercury Music Prize, double Brit Award and three times MOBO Awards winner. Currently back in business with a new track ‘Bad Gyal’ 2009 is setting up to see a lot more of one of the UK’s finest

 Ashley Thomas AKA BASHY is the hottest artists to emerge in a brand new wave of fresh and exciting British UK musical talent. With over I million hits on youtube for both tracks released independantly in 2008,  an appearance at last years Glastonbury, 2009 promises to be a huge year for this outstanding talent with the release of his first album ‘Catch Me If You Can’

Linton Kwesi-Johnson: is known and revered as the world’s first reggae poet and has recorded several classic reggae albums. He recently became only the second living poet and the first Black poet to have his work published in Penguin’s Modern Classics series under the title ‘Mi Revalueshanary Fren’

Maroon Town: 9 piece globe trotting ska barnstormers who amongst normal band activities also play in high security prisons from Jamaica to Kazakhstan. In May they are off to Tajikisan to perform and collaborate with local artists.

DJ Gerry Lyseight co-founded Brixton’s mythical Mambo Inn; DJed around the world; at festivals such as Glastonbury, Womad and The Big Chill; with everyone from Tito Puente to King Sunny Ade; compiled many albums; hosted radio programmes featuring everyone from Charlie Watts to Rufus Wainwright to Mr. Scruff to Bebel Gilberto to the late Kirsty MacColl.

Some of the young people CEN has supported and reintegrated back into full time education will also perform.

The evening’s compere will be Eugene Skeef composer, poet, percussionist and workshop leader.

Event: ‘Jammin for Inclusion’
Date:    Wednesday 25th March 2009       
Time:   7 till late
Venue: Jamm, 261 Brixton Road, Brixton SW9 2LH 
Price:   £8.00

Note to Editors
For further information contact Deuan German at CEN:  020 8432 0530 or 07958 546 113. Email: deuangerman@hotmail.com

For tickets:  http://www.ticketweb.co.uk/user/?region=gb_london&query=detail&event=313684&interface=

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk