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MARXISM AND NEW MEDIA CONFERENCE – DUKE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS / CALL FOR PROJECTS: MARXISM AND NEW MEDIA
DUKE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM IN LITERATURE (DURHAM, NC)
JANUARY 20 & 21, 2012
KEYNOTES: ALEX GALLOWAY (NYU) and RICARDO DOMINGUEZ (UCSD)
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS: OCTOBER 30, 2011

CONTACT: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

New media technologies are leading to the emergence of vibrant public spaces in countries like China and Tunisia, facilitating previously restricted dissent and political deliberation. Similarly, scholars, journalists, and activists are using networking and social media to organize coalitions and mobilize resistance in contexts as diverse as the Wisconsin protests, the Wall Street protests, and the so-called “Arab Spring.” In an ironic self-critique, smartphone applications like the newly released “Phone Game” are even exposing the global working conditions and problematic material production of contemporary consumer technology through their very gameplay. With the implicit resistance to hegemony and material critique in these examples, Marxism offers both methodological and interpretive tools for interfacing with new media, not least among them a dialectical analysis of the global relations of production. However, writing in the Nation, Chris Lehmann has recently argued that the Internet is less the harbinger of post-capitalist cyber-Utopia than a “digital plantation” in which unpaid digital labor and leisure time become transmogrified into ad revenue. In their article, “The Internet’s Unholy Marriage to Capitalism,” John Bellamy Foster and Robert W. McChesney likewise argue that the Internet and related media signify not the suspension of the laws of capitalism, but rather their final perfection.

It seems, then, that a number of unresolved questions linger concerning the ways new media both participate in and creatively resist institutional power. As such, we hope to provide a fresh articulation interrogating the intersection between the theories and practices of new media technologies and Marxist critique. For example: how should we consider the economic, environmental, and human costs incurred in the production of new media technologies? How might resistance and radical change emerge among the ongoing institutionalization, and the incumbent conservatism, of both Marxism and new media studies? How will we navigate through the internal divisions of an academy that has eagerly appropriated new media as a strategy to “reinvigorate” the humanities through renewed funding and (often) corporate partnership?

We invite both papers and creative/artistic work that address these issues and others that deal with the engagement of Marxist thought and the study of media technologies. Papers may intervene at points of seeming incompatibility, address the current place of this convergence in one or many institutional and cultural settings, or perhaps look forward to emerging discourses relating to this intersection.

 

Possible paper, project, and panel topics might include:

* New Opportunities for Resistance, Wikileaks, Hacking and Hacktivism, Pirate Culture, the Arab Spring, the Jasmine Revolution, and Anonymous

* Immaterial Labor, User-Generated Content, the Knowledge Worker, Affective Labor, Precariousness and “the Precariat,” the DigitalPlantation, and the Attention Economy

* Intellectual Property, Copyright,Creative Commons, Open Access and Open Source Practices, and Virtual Property

* New Forms of Collectivity, Wikipedia, Crowdsourcing, Flash Mobs, Smart Mobs, and Partcipatory Journalism

* New Regimes of Control, Censorship, Filtering, Firewalls, and Search Engine Rankings

* New Media Art

* Critical Code Studies

* Critical Game Studies

* Biomedicine and Biometrics

* Energy, Ecology, Tech Trash

* The Open University

* ‘Re-Visualizing’ Marxism

* Ideology, Contact Zones, and Interfaces

 

Please send a 250-500 word abstract to marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com by October 30, 2011.

ORGANIZERS
Zach Blas
Gerry Canavan
Amanda Starling Gould
Rachel Greenspan
Melody Jue
Lisa Klarr
Clarissa Lee
John Stadler
Michael Swacha
Karim Wissa

 

Marxism and New Media Conference: http://literature.duke.edu/marxism-and-new-media-conference

CONTACT: marxismandnewmedia@gmail.com

 

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Karl Marx

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: NEW CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS

CALL FOR PAPERS

For Proposed International Sociological Association 2012 Panel:

Title: Marxism and IPE: New Critical Engagements

Abstract:

Accumulation through dispossession, new enclosures, rent becoming profit, general intellect, immaterial labor, multitudes and the common. All of these are Marxist concepts of some variety or another which although prevalent in geography, sociology, anthropology and cultural studies still have not made their way into International Political Economy, where Marxist perspectives remain marginal and somewhat parochial (limited to historical materialist and world-systems analyses).

This panel calls for papers interested in exploring issues of global capital and empire from fresh theoretical angles such as those offered by autonomist Marxists like Hardt & Negri, Christian Marazzi, Sandro Mezzadra, Franco Berardi (bifo), and Silvia Federici, normative Marxists like George Caffentzis, Massimo de Angelis, David Graeber, and Harry Cleaver and Marxist geographers like Saskia Sassen, David Harvey, and Jamie Peck.

We welcome both theoretical engagements with questions of accumulation and valorization in internation al politics as well as more specific studies of the politics of everyday life, e.g., financialization, labor, education, consumption, culture, identity and ecology.    

Please submit your papers titles and abstracts to the conveners, Wanda Vrasti wndvrst@googlemail.com and Nicholas Kiersey kiersey@ohio.edu, by May 25th.

Note, please, that we intend to make this panel the basis of an edited book volume, should it be accepted. Thank you!

International Sociological Association: http://www.isa-sociology.org/

Universities in Crisis (an ISA blog): http://www.isa-sociology.org/universities-in-crisis/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

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Autonomia

POST/AUTONOMIA – CALL FOR PAPERS

Post/autonomia – Call for Papers

Amsterdam, 19-22 May 2011

University of Amsterdam/SMART Project Space

Keynote speakers include:

Franco Berardi (‘Bifo’)

Vittorio Morfino

Stevphen Shukaitis (to be confirmed)

Immaterial labour; multitude; the communism of capital; commons; precarity; biopolitics: autonomist thought has undoubtedly provided contemporary critical theory with some of its major concepts and/or allowed for an important reconsidering of these. Most importantly, autonomist thought has been at the forefront of thinking the crucial shifts in contemporary capitalism and its effects in both the social and cultural sphere. Autonomism’s impact on current critical theory in both European and American academia can therefore hardly be underestimated. Moreover, today we witness a resurgence of autonomist models of activism and thought in social movements in for example Italy, Greece, the UK and California.

What can ‘post/autonomia’ mean today?’ therefore is one of the pivotal questions in contemporary critical theory and activism. Rather than packaging it as ‘Italian Theory’, we would like to explore the international dissemination of autonomous thought and activism today and their possible futures; in particular we would like to explore critical engagements and uses of autonomist ideas that shape what we might call post/autonomia. It is precisely the dynamics, tensions and ruptures between autonomia and its possible futures (or ‘posts’) that we would like to investigate. What are the effects of autonomia, as a thought and a movement, in a variety of domains: from critical theory to cinema, from activism to academic practice?

Crucial questions raised by the notion of post/autonomia are:

* How did autonomist thought move from what was in fact a specific local context to the global activist and intellectual sphere?

* What are the possible connections between (post)autonomia and other contemporary conceptualizations of ‘communism’?

* What is the role of (post)autonomist thinking in current efforts to reassemble and reconstitute the militant left?

* What are possible connections/convergences between (post)autonomism and post-situationism, anarchism or the green movement?

* How can post/autonomia be situated in the aftermath or even afterlife of the ‘no global’ moment?    * How is post/autonomia taking shape in diverse cultural and artistic interventions?

* What is the significance of autonomist thought in non-western/global contexts (e.g. the debates concerning precarious labour in China)?

* How does the current the interest in autonomism and its relevance relate to political discourses concerning the ‘heritage’ of 68/77 and their alleged ‘liquidation’ (by Berlusconi/Sarkozy); to what extent does it encourage or block these debates?

* What elements of autonomism remain unaddressed today (e.g. the feminist heritage)?

* What particular nexus between theory/militant practice takes shape in post/autonomia (e.g. in media activism and precarity-movements)?

* What new perspectives/connections can be created: e.g. post/autonomia and queer, the metropolis, bioeconomy, etc. etc.

The conference will provide a platform for addressing these and other important questions. Papers may address the following topics (but are by no means bound to these):

Post/autonomia and:

–       contemporary activism

–       conceptualizations of bio-politics

–       the neo-liberal state

–       precarity

–       media activism

–       academic activism and new student movements (L’Onda che viene etc)

–       post-situationism

–       queer autonomy

–       feminism

–       the work of individual theorists (e.g. Negri, Virno, Berardi, Guattari, Lazzerato, Marazzi etc)

–       semiocapitalism

–       artistic and cultural activism

–       political/cultural memories of autonomia

–       the metropolis and the social factory today

–       the new communism

–       transversality

–       new spinozisms

–       (the lessons of) Genoa 2001

–       strategies of resistance

–       populism

–       the law, the state of exception and legitimacy

We welcome both academic and practice-oriented contributions in English. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Please send abstracts (350 words) before March 15 to postautonomia@gmail.com. For further information, please contact postautonomia@gmail.com.

This conference is the first of a series within the project Precarity and Post-autonomia: the Global Heritage funded by NWO (Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research).

Organizing committee:

–       Vincenzo Binetti, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)

–       Joost de Bloois, University of Amsterdam

–       Silvia Contarini, Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défence

–       Monica Jansen, Utrecht University

–       Federico Luisetti, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)

–       Frans-Willem Korsten, Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam

–       Gianluca Turricchia, University of Amsterdam

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Alternative Culture

 

COMMONALITIES CONFERENCE

Please join us for “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Contemporary Italian Thought,” a conference sponsored by the journal diacritics. The event, to be held at Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010, will bring together a number of leading thinkers around the theme and question of the common. Participants will include Kevin Attell, Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Remo Bodei, Bruno Bosteels, Cesare Casarino, Roberto Esposito, Ida Dominijanni, Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri (by video conference), and Karen Pinkus. More information can be found at the conference website (www.commonconf.com) or by contacting Professor Timothy Campbell (tcc9@cornell.edu)

Il manifesto
For the better part of a decade the position of Italian thought in the Anglo-American academy has increasingly grown in importance. From issues as far ranging as bioethics and bioengineering, to euthanasia, to globalization, to theorizing gender, to the war on terror, works originating in Italy have played a significant, perhaps even the dominant, role in setting the terms and conditions of these debates. Indeed it might well be that no contemporary thought more than Italian enjoys greater success today in the United States. If twenty years of postmodernism and poststructuralism were in large measure the result of French exports to the United States — Derrida, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault — today a number of Italian philosophical exports are giving rise to a theoretical dispositif that goes under a variety of names: post-Marxist, posthuman, or most often biopolitical. Yet the fact that Italian thought enjoys such enormous success in the United States and elsewhere begs an important question, one put to me polemically recently by a prominent Italian philosopher. Is there really such a thing as contemporary Italian thought? And if there is what in the world do its proponents have in common?

By way of responding, it might be useful to recall some details about the recent reception of Italian thought in the American academy. In the aftermath of the end of the postmodern — which a number of American observers savored as spelling the end of the use and abuse of philosophy by large numbers of literary critics — two works appeared in English within a span of three years: Giorgio Agamben’s ‘Homo Sacer’ and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s ‘Empire’. Stepping into the void left by the departure of what in the United States was known as “theory,” these works made a number of bold theoretical claims about the relation between political power and individual life (Agamben) and globalization and collective life (Hardt and Negri), claims that uncannily – sometimes almost prophetically – addressed some of the most pressing issues in our current state of affairs. Equally a number of important works of Italian feminism appeared over roughly the same period. Works by Adriana Cavarero and Rosi Braidotti, among others, deeply influenced a whole generation of American theorists in fields like gender studies, political philosophy, and law. Looking back it’s difficult to overestimate the influence of all these figures when accounting for the intellectual success of Italian thought today. Certainly it became possible for other voices to be heard, Paolo Virno, and more recently Franco Berardi, Roberto Esposito, and Maurizio Lazzarato among others.

But to take up again the question at hand: what do authors as seemingly different as Agamben and Negri, Berardi and Esposito, Braidotti and Bodei, or Cavarero and Virno have in common outside of the mere fact of writing in Italian? Beyond a common language, is there, for example, such a thing as a common Italian philosophical tradition of which they are all a part? Some, most notably, Mario Perniola, would say yes, one found in the elements of repetition, transmission, mixture, and body that together forged an Italian philosophical culture over the last 300 years. Deleuze and Guattari would have said no, arguing that Italy has historically “lacked a milieu” for philosophy. For them the reason for this lack could be found in Italy’s proximity to the Holy See, which continually aborted philosophy across the peninsula, reducing Italian thought to mere rhetoric, philosophy’s shadow, and allowing only for the occasional “comet” to briefly light up the philosophical sky. Yet what if Italian thought today does in fact enjoy a milieu? What “event” or “events” in the recent past might have fashioned a milieu for the emergence of Italian thought? What would the features of that milieu look like?

Undoubtedly, the decade-long Italian 1968 would have played the decisive role. The votes on abortion, the emergence of counterculture and student and feminist movements, and changes in labor and production all deeply changed the space in which politics — as well as philosophy – was practiced. Indeed one of the central features of the Italian 1968 was precisely the emphasis on politics as philosophy and philosophy as a form (among others) of politics. We can see this in the place 1968 and 1977 awarded political militancy; in the increasing prominence given to questions of subjectivization; and more broadly in the birth of new forms of social and political life separated from those that had previously dominated.

Yet Italy’s long 1968 wasn’t enough on its own. It was only with 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall that politics and philosophy truly begin to pass intensely into each other, to stay with the language of Deleuze and Guattari. Although it may seem less the case for those writing in Italy, when seen from the outside 1989 was experienced as trauma more in Italy than in the rest of Europe. The result forced a number of thinkers to re-examine the fundamental political and philosophical categories that had underpinned decades if not centuries of thought: what meaning would the end of a certain form of common life have for politics, for philosophy, for culture? Such a calling into question of the previous understanding of the common had the effect of reterritorializing politics and philosophy under new terms and new problematics, one of which will be “life,” broadly speaking. It is only when 1968 is considered as the motor for deterritorialization of the common in political theory and philosophy and 1989 as the turn toward its reterritorialization as newly mapped by (among other things) biopolitical theory that something like a milieu is constructed for contemporary Italian thought.

This is not to say that proponents of Italian thought share the same understanding of the common or even celebrate it. Clearly they do not. Yet the centrality of the common raises a number of questions about Italian thought and Italian public life today. What does it mean to be or have in common in 2010? What are the effects of questioning the weight of shared life and what possible futures are there for the common? How might singularities be thought together so as to create new forms of life and what kinds of co-habitations or contaminations might reinforce these new forms of life? These kinds of questions are ones Italian thought, in all its diversity, has placed at the forefront of contemporary theory, questions that in turn raise fundamental questions about the nature of relationality and of a politics that would seek to strengthen relations and to extend them in order to create yet further relationality. Such is the force of Hardt and Negri’s discussion of the capacity for love near the end of Commonwealth, though one can well imagine others, including a capacity for play, for attention, and for compassion too.

Yet the relationality implicit in these new forms of shared life doesn’t only lead to greater and more positive capacities for relationality among singularities. The deterritorialization of the common as biopolitics, the posthuman or even insurrection by no means conjures away the specter of power; thus with greater capacity on the one hand comes the possibility of more intense and invasive forms of power on the other. The question then becomes: how are new forms of the common that are being forged today — shared singularities, mirror neurons, impersonality – also being reterritorialized and recontained, and by whom? Is it possible that more intense forms of relationality might signal a return to the very terms that earlier critiques of the common had attempted to uncover? On the one hand the recent success of social networking sites like Facebook suggests that new forms of virtual relations involving vast numbers of “friends” are not only possible but involve ever greater exposure to others. On the other hand such exchanges continue to be premised on the notion that my body and my opinions belong to me, what the Invisible Committee unforgetably characterized as treating “our Self like a boring box office,” using whatever prosthesis is at hand “to hold onto an I.” In such a neo-liberal scenario, the circulation of information, of goods, of persons, of persons as goods is taken to mean a return to a common mode of being-together. It’s a film we’ve seen countless times before: the common’s reinscription in contexts less open to affect that are continually based upon a conflation of connnectivity with more open modes of relating.

These questions among others will be the foundation for a two-day conference sponsored by the journal Diacritics to be held on the campus of Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010. The conference, titled “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Italian Thought,” will bring together a number of Italian voices so as to think together not only the relation between Italy and the common but to consider emerging forms of the common and common life today as well as consider the efficacy of a term like the common for a progressive (bio)politics. Equally, the event, the first of its kind of recent memory in the United States, is an occasion to register the state of Italian thought today. When seen from the other side of the Atlantic, no other contemporary thought more than Italian seems better suited today to offer what Foucault called an ontology of the present. At a minimum, and pace my doubting Italian philosopher, the editorial and intellectual success of Italian thought merits a closer look.

Featured at the conference will be some of the leading philosophical figures from Italy today, including Franco Berardi, Remo Bodei, Cesare Casarino, Ida Dominjanni, Roberto Esposito, Michael Hardt, and Antonio Negri. The conference will be transmitted over the internet at http://www.commonconf.com. A number of Cornell students will be blogging the conference live over the two days.

Antonio Negri

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Culture

CULTURE & ORGANIZATION

Call for Papers

There will be a Special Issue of the journal Culture & Organization on: Commodities & Markets

Edited by Stevphen Shukaitis (Autonomedia / University of Essex) & Ming Lim (University of Leicester)

What would commodities say if they could speak? Marx’s wistful question can seem playful in some registers. Paul Jennings, for instance, proposed in his “Report of Existentialism” (1963) that everyday objects are constantly at war with their users: “things are against us,” he gleefully pronounces. And yet, objects voice themselves not only through our playful – or rueful – gaze.  If Marx had listened long enough, these talking commodities would have announced the traumas of their exploitative and violent birthing to him. Eventually, one imagines, they would have described the nature of the various forms of labour necessary for their production in the capitalist mode. As Fred Moten (2003) points out, history is marked by the revolt of the screaming commodity: the body of the slave fighting against its imposed status of thing-liness.

The rise of consumer culture, the proliferation and intensification of the commodity, can be understood as the expansion of the violence of accumulation all across the social field. The ferocious forces which separate the producer from the product of the labour process have not waned; on the contrary, they have become monstrously multiplied and rendered all the more invisible by their ubiquity in the society of the spectacle (Debord 1983). The critique and denunciation of these forces, have, in fact, become yet another commodity in the spectacle; something we witness today in the backlash against banks, bankers and speculators and all the glorified preening of capitalist consumption they stand for. Is this trend, then, the ‘new spirit of capitalism’?    

And yet, an alternative exists to the vicious dynamics described above.  One thinks, for instance, of the practices of Russian constructivists during the 1920s. The Constructivists, employing their artistic practices and knowledges to reconfigure industrial design and production, argued that rather than denouncing the seductive lure of the capitalist commodity it would be possible to utilize these energies to reshape the socialist world. This would move the objects produced for use and consumption from being capitalist commodity to be active participants in the building of this world: it would make them into comrades (Kiaer 2005).  Yet, how attractive is this vision to the postmodern consumer? Is it more or less dangerous than its alternative?

Today, therefore, we need to reconsider the “state of things,” or, put another way, the “state” of things.  Both bloody commodities and comradely objects exist, as a double edge, all around us:  the stubborn existence of sweatshop production and labour exploitation exist side-by-side with the proliferation of ‘helpful’ technologies and all sorts of interactive gadgets and participatory media networks. Fair trade products have moved from the status of marginal subcultural practices to multinational corporate cash schemes. Are we seeing the inauguration of a new era of ethical production through the commodity form (Arvidsson 2006) or the latest and most comprehensive example of alienation, one that is now self-managed through the fetish of ethical consumption?  What would objects now say to us?

This issue aims to find out. Possible areas for inquiry could include but are not limited to:

• Commodity fetishism, surfaces and glosses

• Revolting objects and rebellious products

• The current ‘ethical’ fetishes in production and consumption

• Autoreduction and reappropriation of commodities

• The labour of making labour ‘disappear’ from commodities

• Spectacular society and its other

• The commons in and through the ‘market’ and ‘markets’

• The madness of crowds and the taming influence of objects

References

Arvidsson, Adam (2006) Brands: Meaning and Value in Media Culture. London: Routledge.

Debord, Guy (1983) Society of the Spectacle. Detroit, MI: Red & Black.

Jennings, Paul (1963) “Report of Resistentialism,” Town & Country. Available at www.resistentialists.com

Kiaer, Christina (2005) Imagine No Possessions: The Socialist Objects of Russian Constructivism. Cambridge: MIT University Press.

Moten, Fred (2003) In The Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

We welcome original, high-quality articles between 6,000 to 7,000 words (including references) which are not currently under consideration by other journals and also shorter review articles, commentaries and book reviews.  Potential contributors are welcome to contact the Editors informally, and especially in the case of shorter pieces they may want to submit:  stevphen@autonomedia.org or m.lim@leicester.ac.uk

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Full submission instructions are available on the Culture and Organization publishers’ homepage:   http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14759551.asp. Please read these in full before submitting your manuscript.

Important Dates

• Paper submission deadline: 3rd June, 2011

• Camera ready papers:  30th April, 2012

Publication scheduled for September 2012.

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Global Capitalism

GLOBALIZED CAPITAL: SUBJECTS, SPACES, AND CRITICAL RESPONSES

Call for Papers

17th Annual DePaul University
Philosophy Graduate Student Conference

EXTENDED SUBMISSION DEADLINE: January 29, 2010

Globalized Capital: Subjects, Spaces, and Critical Responses
April 9th & 10th, 2010

Keynote Speaker: Bruno Bosteels
Department of Romance Languages, Cornell University

Questioning capitalism is no easy enterprise. Discourses interrogating capitalism have mirrored the trajectory of capitalism itself, proliferating in a variety of directions and spawning new conceptual and historical problems with each new decade of confrontation. This conference aims to open up a space of convergence and dialogue for disparate trajectories of critical reflection and practical response. Its title aims to emphasize not only capitalism’s global character—its relentless expansion beyond various geographical, cultural, and political “limits”—but at the same time its particularized and often discontinuous local effects—the subjects, practices, and increasingly micro-managed spaces it carves out en route.

We would like to solicit papers dealing with a broad range of topics including, but not limited to:

* Legacies and Boundaries of Expansion: Inside, outside, and beyond the capitalist Nation-State

* Alterity, subalternity, and critiques from the margins.

* Postcolonialism, decolonization, and anti-colonial resistance.

* The metropolis and the collapse of the city/countryside dialectic. Historical and conceptual origins of capitalist economic thought

* Collectivities and Communes in Resistance: Communism

* From parties to groups, from crowds to constituent power

* Capitalism and Internationalism

* Partisanship and/or universalism

* Spaces of work and labors of thought: “immaterial labor,” intellectual culture, and the marketplace of ideas

* Subjects, Selfhood and Culture: Entrepreneurialist cultures of selfhood

* Consumerist ethics and the conscience market

* Neo-archaisms: the role of tradition and faith under capitalism

* Counter-conducts, indocility, and strategies for “de-individualizing” and “decapitalizing” the self

* Images, Representations, and Symbols: Ideology and “ideology critique”

* Narratives and mythologies of capitalism in cinema, art, architecture, and literature

* The semiotics of capital

* Power and Neoliberal Governmentality: Biopower and biopolitical economy

* Marxist critique in a paradigm of perpetual crisis management

* “Total Governance”: from managerial rationalities to the management of life itself

* Counter-insurgency, preventative war, and the securitization of liberty.

Authors should email their submissions to depaulgraduatestudents@gmail.com  
Papers should not exceed 3000 words and should contain a short abstract. As all papers are subject to anonymous review, papers should not include your name or any other identifying marks. Your paper title and personal information (name, institutional affiliation, and phone contact) should be included in the body of the email. For further information and updates on the conference, if you have any questions or problems regarding submissions, or in the event that you do not receive a confirmation email, please contact Neal Miller at zzerohourr@gmail.com

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Historical Materialism

Historical Materialism

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM VOLUME 17 ISSUE 3 (2009)

 

http://www.brill.nl/hima

To subscribe, write to: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Historical Materialism
Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 3
2009

CONTENTS:

Articles

Massimo de Angelis and David Harvie
‘Cognitive Capitalism’ and the Rat-Race: How Capital Measures Immaterial Labour in British Universities

Iain Pirie
The Political Economy of Academic Publishing

Maria Turchetto
Althusser and Monod: A ‘New Alliance’?

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’ (contd.)

Vittorio Morfino
The Syntax of Violence. Between Hegel and Marx

Archive
David Fernbach
Editorial Introduction to Paul Levi’s Our Path: Against Putschism and What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Paul Levi
Our Path: Against Putschism

Paul Levi
What Is the Crime: The March Action or Criticising It?

Interventions

Alberto Toscano
Partisan Thought

Ben Fine and Alfredo Saad-Filho
Twixt Ricardo and Rubin: Debating Kincaid Once More

Jim Kincaid
The Logical Construction of Value Theory: More on Fine and
Saad-Filho

Review Articles

Christian Høgsbjerg
on Frank Rosengarten’s Urbane Revolutionary: C.L.R. James and the Struggle for a New Society and Brett St Louis’s Rethinking Race, Politics, and Poetics: C.L.R. James’ Critique of Modernity

Robert T. Tally Jr
on Loren Goldner’s Herman Melville: Between Charlemagne and the Antemosaic Cosmic Man: Race, Class, and the Crisis of Bourgeois Ideology in the American Renaissance Writer

Seongjin Jeong
on Iain Pirie’s The Korean Developmental State: From Dirigisme to Neo-Liberalism

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism
Peter Thomas
Catharsis

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Autonomia

Autonomia

AUTONMIA, OPERAISMO AND CLASS COMPOSITION

 

Call for Papers

Autonomism, Class Composition, and Cultural Studies

2010 Cultural Studies Association Conference – Berkeley, CA – March 18th – 20th, 2010

Coordinators: Stevphen Shukaitis (Autonomedia / University of Essex) & Jack Z. Bratich (Rutgers University)

The publication of Hardt and Negri’s Empire (2000) brought new attention to a previously ignored current of revolutionary theory and practice, namely that of autonomist Marxism, or more broadly, autonomism. While the work of Hardt and Negri have receive quite a deal of attention within cultural studies research and writing since then, this have tended to neglect the vast wealth of engaged theoretical reflection contained within the history of autonomist thought and organizing, reducing it to the work of a few recent works by particular authors. For instance, the concept of class composition, or the ways in which class formations emerge from contestation and the primacy and determining role of social resistance, shares much in common with various strains of thought in cultural studies. Similarly, workers’ inquiry as a method of inquiring into the conditions of working class life to rethinking its ongoing subversive political potentiality, functions in similar ways to how early cultural studies shifted to an analysis of the everyday based on renewing and deepening radical politics.

Autonomist political analysis involves something very much like a form of cultural studies, exploring how the grounds for radical politics are constantly shifting in response to how capital and the state utilize social insurgencies and movements against themselves. How do cultural studies and autonomism converge and diverge over matters of power, the state, and subjectivity? The panel will explore the future behind our backs, focusing on how autonomist politics and analysis can inform cultural analysis and vice versa. Possible topics for consideration could include:

– Autonomy through and against enclosures

– Class composition and the creative class

– Immaterial labor and cultural production

– Libidinal parasites and desiring production

– Escape and the imperceptible politics of the undercommons

– The multitude and its dark side

– Affective labor and social reproduction

– Work drawing from/on particular autonomist theorists (Tronti, Virno, Fortunati, etc.)

– Precarity and the autonomy of migration

– Post-hegemonic & post-dialectical interventions

– Schizoanalysis & class formation

– Autonomism and the political

 

Send proposals of 500 words to Stevphen Shukaitis (stevphen@autonomedia.org).

The deadline for submissions is September 7th, 2009.

Stevphen Shukaitis is an editor at Autonomedia and lecturer at the University of Essex. He is the editor (with Erika Biddle and David Graeber) of Constituent Imagination: Militant Investigations // Collective Theorization (AK Press, 2007). His research focuses on the emergence of collective imagination in social movements and the changing compositions of cultural and artistic labor. For more on his work and writing, see http://stevphen.mahost.org.

Jack Z. Bratich is assistant professor of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University. He is the author of Conspiracy Panics: Political Rationality and Popular Culture (2008) and co-editor of Foucault, Cultural Studies and Governmentality (2003), and has written articles that apply autonomist thought to such topics as audience studies, reality TV, secession, and popular secrecy.

Stevphen Shukaitis: Autonomedia Editorial Collective, http://www.autonomedia.org, http://info.interactivist.net

“Autonomy is not a fixed, essential state. Like gender, autonomy is created through its performance, by doing/becoming; it is a political practice. To become autonomous is to refuse authoritarian and compulsory cultures of separation and hierarchy through embodied practices of welcoming difference… Becoming autonomous is a political position for it thwarts the exclusions of proprietary knowledge and jealous hoarding of resources, and replaces the social and economic hierarchies on which these depend with a politics of skill exchange, welcome, and collaboration. Freely sharing these with others creates a common wealth of knowledge and power that subverts the domination and hegemony of the master’s rule.”  – subRosa Collective

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6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium 

Call for papers 

Center for Marxist Studies (Centro de Estudos Marxistas -Cemarx) at the University of Campinas (Unicamp) 
Campinas (SP), Brazil, November 2009 
 
The Institute of Humanities’ Center for Marxist Studies at the University of Campinas has begun the call for papers for the 6th INTERNATIONAL MARX & ENGELS COLLOQUIM. Papers should be submitted between March 2 and June 15, 2009. 
 
General Information
 
The 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium accepts two types of papers: those which analyze, critique or develop Marxist theory as their research subject, and papers that utilize the Marxist theoretical framework in empirical or theoretical studies which fit into the event’s Thematic Groups. 
Researchers interested in submitting papers should indicate in which Thematic Group they fit. Occasionally, the Organizing Commission of the 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium might reallocate papers from one group to another. 
The Colloquium ‘s Thematic Groups are as follows: 
 
TG 1 – The theoretical work of Marx 
A critical examination of the works of Marx and Engels, and the polemical debates these stimulated. 
 
TG 2 – Different Marxisms 
A critical examination of the classic works of Marxism from the 19th and 20th centuries. The different currents of Marxist thought and their transformations. The theoretical work of Brazilian and Latin American Marxists. The question of the renewing and modernizing of Marxism. 
 
TG 3 – Marxism and the humanities 
Examination of the presence of Marxism in Economics, Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, History, in the area of International Relations, and Law. Examination of the Marxist critique of the humanities and the contributions of the humanities in the development of Marxism. Polemical theories and Marxist conceptual developments in these areas of study. The presence of Marxism in Brazilian and Latin American universities. 
 
TG 4 – Economics and politics in contemporary capitalism 
The Marxist approach to the economic, political and social transformations in capitalism at the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries. New patterns of accumulation for capital, new imperialist phase, transformation of the State and capitalist democracy. The position of dominant and dependent countries. Brazil and Latin America.
 
TG 5 – Class relations in contemporary capitalism 
The Marxist approach to the transformations that have occurred within the class structure. Workers, the working class, “the new working class” and “the middle class”. The petite bourgeoisie. Peasants in current capitalism. The debate on the decline of class polarization at the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries. The working classes and social movements. The new configuration of the bourgeoisie. Social classes in Brazil and Latin America. The Marxist concept of social class and class struggle in contemporary capitalism. 
 
TG 6 – Education, capitalism and socialism 
The relations between the education system and capitalism from a Marxist perspective: the training of the workforce; education and social classes; ideology and the educational process; education policy. Marxist analysis of education in Brazil and Latin America. The cultural apparatuses of capitalism (universities, research centers). The cultural centers created by the socialist movement. Analysis of the educational experiences conducted in societies that emerged from socialist revolutions in the 20 th century. Marxist theory and education. 
 
TG 7 – Culture, capitalism and socialism 
Capitalism and culture production: the new tendencies; plastic arts, literature and the culture industry. Marxist analysis of culture in Brazil and Latin America. Culture and socialism: the culture movements in societies, which emerged from the revolutions of the 20 th century. Marxism and culture production. 
 
TG 8 – Socialism in the 21st century 
Marxist analysis of 20th century revolutions. The communist and socialist heritage of the 19th and 20th centuries and the socialism of the 21st century. Marxism and socialism. The question of the renewing of socialism. The theory of transition to socialism. Workers and socialist transition. Strengths and obstacles for the reconstruction of the socialist movement in the 21st century. 
 
TG 9 – Labor and production in contemporary capitalism 
Social theory, labor and production. Theoretical concepts on production. Process and production: valorization process and labor process. Control and management of labor process. Class struggle in production. Casualization of labor and employment conditions and re-qualification of the workforce. Theories that affirm and reject the centrality of labor. The new forms of labor exploitation: immaterial labor, informal labor, casualized and informational. 
 
Submission of work 
 
Papers should be submitted between March 2 and June 15, 2009. Researchers should fill in the submission form at the Cemarx website
. They should also mail two printed copies of their paper, together with a copy of their submission form, to Cemarx. Participants should indicate on the outside of the envelope: 
a) The Thematic Group (TG) to which their paper is being submitted; 
b) Their full postal address and email. 
 
Requirements for the submission of work:

 

1. Papers 
The paper (in Spanish or Portuguese) should have between fifteen and twenty-four thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes), totaling no more than ten pages in times new roman size 12 font. Papers beyond this limit will not be considered. Included in the paper should be: the name of the event to which the paper is being submitted, a title, the author’s name and position (professor, post-graduate student, independent researcher), and the Thematic Group in which the author would like to participate. The content of the paper should clearly define the subject to be examined, the methodology used in the research, and present its theses and arguments in a way that clearly addresses the debate (theoretical, historiographical or political) within which the paper is inserted. Important! Papers should follow the referencing rules displayed on the Cemarx website. 
 
2. Table discussions 
A table discussion is made up of at least four papers in the ambit of a Thematic Group. A small number of proposals for table discussions will be accepted, privileging submissions by groups or centers of research, as well as scientific and cultural associations. The papers of table discussion participants, formatted in accord with the previous item, should be sent jointly, accompanied with a brief justification for the table discussion. It is the responsibility of the applicant institution to obtain the necessary resources to ensure the participation of table participants. 
 
3. Posters 
The 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium is open to the participation of undergraduate students, to present papers of scientific initiation or graduation, whose subjects fit in one of the colloquium’s Thematic Groups. 
The research abstract (in Spanish or Portuguese) should have between three to five thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes) in times new roman size 12 font. Included should be: the paper’s title; the author’s name; and the undergraduate course in which he/she is enrolled. The abstract should present the subject of the research, its main ideas and findings. Instructions on poster requirements will be published on the Cemarx website. 
 
Selection announcement 
 
The period for the submission of papers closes on June 15, 2009.

Accepted papers will be posted on the Cemarx’s website – http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/cemarx/ according to the following schedule: 
a) July 30: papers; 
b) August 15: posters. 
The results will be announced four months before the beginning of the event as to allow all participants to ask for grants from financial bodies and universities, as Cemarx cannot finance the attendance of conference participants. 

 
Addresses and contact information
 
Submission of papers: 
Centro de Estudos Marxistas (Cemarx), IFCH-Unicamp 
Caixa Postal 6110 CEP 13083-970 Campinas (SP) Brazil 
(5519) 3521-1639

http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/cemarx/

cemark@unicamp.br

http://www.unicamp.br/unicamp/  

 
Information (from August 1, 2009 ): 
Secretaria de Eventos do IFCH-Unicamp (5519) 3521-1601 /
seceven@unicamp.br

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk