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images (9)SPACE, IDENTITIES AND MEMORY

Birkbeck Institutes of Social Research and the Humanities Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Space, Identities and Memory

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11/03/2016.

Contact: bihbisrconference@gmail.com

We invite postgraduate researchers, academics, activists, artists, and practitioners from across disciplines to contribute to the Birkbeck Institutes’ (BIH/BISR) annual two day conference held from the 13th to the 14th  May 2016.

This year’s conference theme seeks to examine the interplay between identity, space and memory, exploring the ways in which identities may be created, formed and informed by spatial and temporal contexts. In particular, we seek to examine to what extent identities are performed in response to political, social and cultural pressures, including historical circumstances leading to the construction of acceptable and unacceptable identities.

The conference aims to capture the complex overlaying of identities in time and space, and the agency of individuals and communities as they address their own complex understandings of the temporality of identity. Conversely, we hope the conference will highlight how space and time are influenced and shaped by everyday life, sociabilities, mobilisations and processes of subjectivation. In particular we are seeking papers that engage with topics such as:

 

  • The built environment: how are housing, architecture, urbanity and concepts of public and private space harnessed in the self-fashioning of individual and communal identity?
  • Gender, sexuality and race, the politics of becoming and the deterritorialisation of the body;
  • ’Home’, domesticity and concepts of solitude and isolation across time and space;
  • Spaces of dissent and resistance: how is memory imbricated in public spaces as sites of encounters, direct action and creative practices?
  • Displacements and borders: constructing or disassembling boundaries from local to global;
  • Explorations in the use of maps, social cartography and critical geography;
  • Exclusion and inclusion in institutional spaces: how have institutionalised spaces cemented or challenged contemporary and past perspectives on identity?
  • Narrating the past: memorialisation, contestation and re-enactment
  • Innovative methods and approaches in the investigation of the intersections between space, identity and memory

 

Our first confirmed keynote speaker is Andy Merrifield. The conference will conclude with a round table bringing together activists, practitioners and academics.

This is an interdisciplinary conference, designed to foster creative thinking and new research agendas. To this end, we encourage papers from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds that explore the interconnections of space, identity and memory.

We are particularly interested in receiving contributions from artists and practitioners in education, the heritage sector or related fields to participate in this interdisciplinary conference.

Proposals

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Abstracts should be between 200-300 words in length. Please include a short biography with your submission.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is the 11/03/2016. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper after submissions have been reviewed and no later than 31/03/2016.

Contact Details

Please send enquiries and proposals to Beth Hodgett, Calum Wright, Eva Lauenstein & Moniza Rizzini at:

bihbisrconference@gmail.com

images (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images

 

Social Movments

Social Movments

CULTURAL DIFFERENCE AND SOCIAL SOLIDARITY NETWORK: 4TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
“New Directions in Reconciling Solidarity and Difference in Contemporary Societies”
Website: http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
Hosted by Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
June 30th – July 3rd 2015

Strategies for addressing problems of social solidarity in states and communities in a contemporary globalized world while respecting difference and diversity within the boundaries of those communities have become more important than ever with the problematization – and some would say decline – of multiculturalist solutions. In the last decades there has been a rise in moral panics about immigration and right-wing nationalist responses, whilst the emergence of new globalized labor flows and diasporic identities have given rise to cultural conflicts as well as mutual enrichment within urban settings. There has also been a sharper and more prejudicial relationship between western states and Islamic peoples, with a rise in Islamophobia mirroring an apparent hardening of faith-based positions on both sides, intersecting with legitimate concerns about the contradictions and conflicts between traditional faith-based positions and contemporary human rights discourse. The political enterprise of multiculturalism appears limited and presumptive in its solutions and where multiculturalism has been embraced it has been criticized in respect of class divisions, deficiencies in recognitions and redistributions and the amelioration of tensions and conflicts through rhetoric and temporary solutions to symptoms and not causes.

This conference seeks to explore the fertile grounds within and between idealistic, cosmopolitan and ‘radical’ strategies to the more pragmatic attempts to provide solutions to particular, immanent and conjunctural problems of building solidarity with difference, and to explore the intersections between different political approaches to posing solidarity with difference and the practices that constitute everyday experience for communities of difference seeking terms of solidarity.

This conference provides a space for scholars to take stock of the present context and share knowledge – specific or general, empirical or theoretical, with a view to develop and explore the possible ways forward to minimizing violence, discrimination, exclusion and oppression as the means by which difference is managed by political structures. It is hoped that the conference will facilitate the development of more constructive, democratic, participative and inclusive means of promoting solidarity without negating difference and diversity. The conference is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes papers from scholars whose research crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Papers and panels are sought for presentation at parallel sessions where each paper will have a strict maximum of 20 minutes presentation time on panels of 2 papers with 25 minutes per paper discussion time.

The main themes for which papers are sought are:
•    Applying and critiquing theories of difference
•    Dissembling and re-presenting gender: constructions of difference and/or solidarity
•    Making solidarities in the context of difference
•    Refugees, difference, law and media representations
•    Culture and politics in representations of identity and difference
•    Digital media and the making/dissembling of social movements
•    Representing multilingualism in the linguistic landscape
•    States, sectional interests and regulatory regimes: managing difference
•    Culture, art, literature, film and the performance of difference
•    The role of technologies in making representations of difference and solidarity
•    Representations of difference or re-presentations of difference: The problem of representation
•    Language hierarchies in social space
•    Cultural products and the reinforcement or dissolution of differences – the problem of consumption
•    Difference and the construction and deterioration of communities
•    Difference and technology: the changing representation of identity and difference

These themes are not exhaustive and the organizers will consider other papers relevant to the conference subject. We expect to publish a post-conference edited book, derived from the papers presented and organized around themes that reveal themselves during the conference.

There will be two keynote plenary sessions with speakers to be announced. Reflecting the conference theme in the context of the conference venue, one of these sessions will focus on aspects of these themes in Cyprus.

•    Deadline for submission of Abstracts by: March 31, 2015
•    Notification of abstract acceptances and rejections is on a rolling basis (within 3 weeks of submission)
•    Online conference registration open from March 15, 2015 to May 15, 2015
•    Conference Fees to be paid by May 15, 2015

The conference language is English and all papers and presentations should be in English.

The conference fee is 395 Euros (295 Euros for students and non-participants).
This includes:
•    Registration
•    Transport to and from Ercan Airport in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to METU-NCC Campus
•    4 nights at Campus Guest House with breakfast
•    4 lunches
•    2 Sunset Dinners (all drinks included)
•    1 Dinner Banquet (non-alcoholic drinks included)
•    Guided Historic/Cultural Excursion

Abstracts of no more than 350 words may be submitted online only at:  http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
For any questions or concerns please see our website, including the FAQ page, or contact the conference organizers at the email address below.

Conference Organisers:
Scott H. Boyd: Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
Paul Reynolds: Edge Hill University
info@differenceandsolidarity.org

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Some Additions to Academia: February 2015: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/some-additions-to-academia-february-2015/

Teaching Marx

Teaching Marx

MUSLIM STUDENTS IN POST 9-11 AMERICA

The Centre for Research and Evaluation in Muslim Education (CREME) invites you to a seminar on: ‘Muslim students in post 9-11 America: Racial interpellation and intersectional identities’.

Presenter: Dr Arshad Ali, Institute of Education

Date: Thursday 05 June 2014
Time: 17:30 – 19:00
Venue: Committee Room 1 (Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL)

The seminar will conclude with a farewell reception for Arshad, who is leaving the Institute at the end of June.

Kind regards,

Ellora

 

Ellora Khan

Administration Officer

Institute of Education, University of London

20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

T: +44 (0)20 7911 5328

E: E.Khan@ioe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Monsters

Monsters

THE POWER OF THE MONSTROUS

The Power of the Monstrous: a Seminar Series and an International Conference

Identity, Alterity, Monstrosity: Figures of the multitude

Seminar Series

Queen Mary, University of London

Mile End Road

London E1 4NS

Arts Two Building, room 3.16

All meetings @ 5 p.m.

MEETINGS: 

26 February

Filippo Del Lucchese (Brunel University, London and Collège international de philosophie) and Caroline Williams (Queen Mary, University of London), The Power of the Monstrous

26 March

Oliver Feltham (American University of Paris), Who is the ruling authority? Spinoza and Hobbes on power and subjectivity

Andrea Bardin (Brunel University, London),  The Early-Modern Metamorphosis of the Body Politic: Hobbes’s Anomaly

14 May

Jason Read (University of Southern Maine), The Affective Composition of the Political: From Negative Solidarity to Collective Indignatio

11 June

Dimitris Vardoulakis (University of Western Sidney), “The main political question is to identify the enemy”: Negri’s Monster.

Info and booking: http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/theorylab  

 

The Power of the Monstrous

International Conference

Brunel University, London

School of Social Sciences

Uxbridge UB8 3PH

Gaskell building, room 239

26-27 June 2014 @ 9.30 a.m.

SPEAKERS:

Laurent Bove (Université de Picardie, Emeritus), La monstruosité chez Camus: de l’absurde à l’histoire

Fabio Frosini (Università di Urbino), Absolute and relative perfection of the “monsters”: politics and history in Giacomo Leopardi 

Annie Ibrahim (Former programme director at the Collège international de philosophie, and Groupe d’études du matérialisme rationnel) Les monstres de Diderot, entre physiologie et politique

Arnaud Milanese (ENS, Lyon and CERPHI), The Beast and the Sovereign according to Hobbes

Vittorio Morfino (Università di Milano-Bicocca), Lucretius and Monsters: Between Bergson and Canguilhem

Mark Neocleous (BrunelUniversity, London), The Monster and the Police

Sue Ruddick (University of Toronto), Monstrous Earth

Yannis Stavrakakis (AristotleUniversity of Thessaloniki): Irrational, Extreme, Populist: The New Fear of the Masses in Debt Society

Amy Stefanovic (The School of Humanities and Communication Arts. The University of Western Sydney) The Extralegal Beast: On Hobbes and Sovereignty

Lasse Thomassen (Queen Mary, University of London) Monstrous Masses Beyond Representation: the Spanish Indignados

Andrea Torrano (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba), The Political Monster between Sovereignity and Biopolitics

 

Info and booking: http://goo.gl/vbrX6h

The seminar series and the conference are supported by:

Collège International de Philosophie, Paris

TheoryLAB, London

School of Politics and International Relations, Queen Mary, University of London

School of Social Sciences, BrunelUniversity, London

CERPHI: Institut d’histoire de la pensée classique, Lyon

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Monsters

Monsters

IDENTITY, ALTERITY, MONSTROSITY: FIGURES OF THE MULTITUDE

Identity, Alterity, Monstrosity: Figures of the Multitude (I)

The process of construction of identity, both individual and collective, and the genesis of political subjectivity, are largely grounded on concurrent ideological mechanisms that define otherness: subjectivity, alterity and identity are the complex outcomes of one intellectual and cultural process, historically produced by the encounter with the Other, whether real or imagined.

Notwithstanding the effort in conceptualising this encounter in the global and multicultural context of contemporary societies, its historical genealogy is often underestimated: a genealogy that is rooted in the theoretical definition of the concepts of normality, abnormality, and monstrosity. Developed in the early modern age, these concepts have produced and keep producing their cultural, social, and political effects.

The main objective of this seminar is to reconstruct the genealogy of the modern problem of identity, subjectivity, and otherness through an historical analysis of the idea of monstrosity within scientific, philosophical, and literary discourses of early modernity.

During the first semester of this seminar we will focus on the radical alterity represented since the 17th century by the theoretical figure of the multitude. Hobbes, for example, develops the idea of the Leviathan’s sovereign body through the homogeneous unity of the people. By definition, the people is opposed to the conflictual multiplicity of the multitude in the state of nature. In contrast, Spinoza grounds the idea of a free State on the multitude’s conatus – its drive to actualize its own nature – and its right of resistance against the sovereign. This right is irreducible and monstrous, thus introducing the natural dimension into the State rather than excluding it from society.

While Hobbes confined the multitude to the edges of the political map, with Spinoza it takes centre-stage, becoming the beating and conflictual heart of political life. Starting with the indirect dialogue between these two authors, we will focus this year on radical and monstrous alterity – the sense of otherness and how that is defined – in early modern and contemporary thought.

Organised by Filippo Del Lucchese (Brunel University, London and Collège International de Philosophie) and Caroline Williams (Queen Mary, University of London). For more information, contact:
Filippo Dellucchese <Filippo.Dellucchese@brunel. ac.uk>
Caroline Williams <c.a.williams@qmul.ac.uk>

Location: QMUL, ARTS TWO (room TPC) 5:00pm
Dates: 26th February, 26th March, 14th May, 11th June

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Teaching Marx

Teaching Marx

BRUNEL SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT RESEARCH GROUP SEMINAR SERIES – 2013/2014

Re/Dis/Order

Following successful seminar series and international conferences in the last years, the Brunel Social and Political Thought research group will organise another seminar series in 2013/14: ‘Re/Dis/Order’. This seminar series aims to explore the different ways in which the constitution, transformation and negation of political order have been understood by some of the key theorists of modern political thought, from the early modern period to contemporary social and political theory. Seminars are open to all.

Term 1

Wednesday 30th October 2013, 4:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

State and Capital

Andrea Bardin (Brunel University) ‘Mechanising the Organic: Hobbes and the Epistemological Revolution in Civil Science’

Matthijs Krul (Brunel University) ‘Neoliberal Visions of Order: Theories of the State in the New Institutional Economic History’

Wednesday 13th November 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Fabio Raimondi (University of Salerno) ‘Althusser, Machiavelli and the Problem of Political Power’

Wednesday 27th November 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Sara R. Farris (Goldsmiths, University of London) ‘From the Jewish Question to the Muslim Question’

Wednesday 11th December 2013, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Fillippo del Lucchese (Brunel University) ‘Machiavelli and Constituent Power’

Term 2

Wednesday 8th January 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University) ‘“We Good Subalterns”: Gramsci’s Theory of Political Modernity’

Wednesday 29th January 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 210

Banu Bargu (SOAS) ‘Sovereignty as Erasure’

Wednesday 5th February 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Nathaniel Boyd (Brunel University) ‘Organising the Body Politic: Hegel’s Corporate Theory of State’

Wednesday 19th February 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Jamie Pitman (BrunelUniversity) ‘Castor and Pollux? The Marx-Engels Relationship’

Ebubekir Dursun (Brunel University) ‘“Stubborn, Insociable, Froward, Intractable”: the History of the Excluded in Hobbes’s Leviathan’

Wednesday 5th March 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

John Roberts (Brunel University) ‘Beyond Flows, Fluids and Networks: Social Theory and the Fetishism of the Global Informational Economy’

Wednesday 26th March 2014, 1:00pm, Gaskell Building Room 239

Mark Neocleous (Brunel University)

Book Launch: ‘War Power, Police Power’ (Edinburgh University Press, 2014)

All seminars take place at Brunel University. Directions to the campus can be found here:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/campus/directions

For further information, please contact:

Peter Thomas at PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

Visit the Brunel SPT Research Group webpages:

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/modern-political-thought-violence-and-revolution-ma
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/sss/politics/research-groups-and-centres/social-and-political-thought
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brunel-University-Modern-Political-Thought/205393026150272?sk=wall

 

Other Brunel SPT Activities in 2013/14

Film Screening Series
(Organised in Collaboration with the Isambard Centre for Historical Research)

Paths of Shame: WWI in Cinema

1st October: S. Kubrick, Paths of Glory (1957)

15th October: R. Bernard, Wooden Crosses (1932)

29th October: J. Losey, King and Country (1964)

12th November: J. Renoir, La Grande Illusion (1939)

26th November: F. Rosi, Many Wars Ago (1970)

10th December: D. Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun (1971)

All screenings in Gaskell Building Room 239 @ 5:30pm

Organised by Alison Carrol and Filippo del Lucchese

For more information, contact:
Alison Carrol <Alison.Carrol@brunel.ac.uk>
Filippo Dellucchese <Filippo.Dellucchese@brunel.ac.uk>

 

Identity, Alterity, Monstrosity: Figures of the Multitude (I)

The process of construction of identity, both individual and collective, and the genesis of political subjectivity, are largely grounded on concurrent ideological mechanisms that define otherness: subjectivity, alterity and identity are the complex outcomes of one intellectual and cultural process, historically produced by the encounter with the Other, whether real or imagined.
Notwithstanding the effort in conceptualising this encounter in the global and multicultural context of contemporary societies, its historical genealogy is often underestimated: a genealogy that is rooted in the theoretical definition of the concepts of normality, abnormality, and monstrosity. Developed in the early modern age, these concepts have produced and keep producing their cultural, social, and political effects.
The main objective of this seminar is to reconstruct the genealogy of the modern problem of identity, subjectivity, and otherness through an historical analysis of the idea of monstrosity within scientific, philosophical, and literary discourses of early modernity.
During the first semester of this seminar we will focus on the radical alterity represented since the 17th century by the theoretical figure of the multitude. Hobbes, for example, develops the idea of the Leviathan’s sovereign body through the homogeneous unity of the people. By definition, the people is opposed to the conflictual multiplicity of the multitude in the state of nature. In contrast, Spinoza grounds the idea of a free State on the multitude’s conatus – its drive to actualize its own nature – and its right of resistance against the sovereign. This right is irreducible and monstrous, thus introducing the natural dimension into the State rather than excluding it from society.
While Hobbes confined the multitude to the edges of the political map, with Spinoza it takes centre-stage, becoming the beating and conflictual heart of political life. Starting with the indirect dialogue between these two authors, we will focus this year on radical and monstrous alterity – the sense of otherness and how that is defined – in early modern and contemporary thought.

Organised by Filippo Del Lucchese (BrunelUniversity, London and Collège International de Philosophie) and Caroline Williams (Queen Mary, University of London). For more information, contact:

Filippo Dellucchese <Filippo.Dellucchese@brunel.ac.uk>
Caroline Williams <c.a.williams@qmul.ac.uk>

Location: QMUL, ARTS TWO (room TPC) 5:00pm

Dates: 26th February, 26th March, 14th May, 11th June

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/brunel-social-and-political-thought-research-group-seminar-series-2013-14-re-dis-order.-starts-30-october

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Peter Mayo

POSTCOLONIAL DIRECTIONS IN EDUCATION

FOCUS AND SCOPE

Postcolonial Directions in Education is a peer reviewed open access journal produced twice a year. It is a scholarly journal intended to foster further understanding, advancement and reshaping of the field of postcolonial education.

We welcome articles that contribute to advancing the field. As indicated in the Editorial for the inaugural issue, the purview of this journal is broad enough to encompass a variety of disciplinary approaches, including but not confined to the following: sociological, anthropological, historical and social psychological approaches.

The areas embraced include anti-racist education, decolonizing education, critical multiculturalism, critical racism theory, direct colonial experiences in education and their legacies for present day educational structures and practice, educational experiences reflecting the culture and ‘imagination’ of empire, the impact of neoliberalism / globalisation / structural adjustment programmes on education, colonial curricula and subaltern alternatives, education and liberation movements, challenging hegemonic languages, the promotion of local literacies and linguistic diversity, neo-colonial education and identity construction, colonialism and the construction of patriarchy, canon and canonicity, Indigenous knowledges , supranational bodies and their educational frameworks, north-south and east-west relations in education, the politics of representation, unlearning colonial stereotypes, internal colonialism and education, Cultural hybridity and learning  in  postcolonial contexts, education and the politics of dislocation, biographies / autobiographies reflecting the above themes, deconstruction of colonial narratives of civilization within educational contexts.

Once again the field cannot be exhausted.

 

See Postcolonial Directions in Education at: http://www.um.edu.mt/pde/index.php/pde1/index

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Smoke Monster

GENETICS: THE SOCIOLOGY OF IDENTITY

Genetics: The Sociology of Identity

Sociology Special Issue Call for Papers

REMINDER – Deadline: 31 July 2012

There is still time to submit your paper to this special issue.

The special issue, for October 2013, addresses the many ways in which genetic knowledge and technologies intersect with the formations of personal, social, cultural, racial/ethnic and national identities in contemporary societies. It will bring together sociological analysis of identity concepts and practices with reflections on the role of genetic knowledge in the formation of contemporary identities.

Possible themes may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Genetics, normativity and the dynamics of identity
  • The role of genetics in creating and contesting racialised identities
  • Genetics, colonialism, imperialism and power
  • Genetics in social institutions: medicine, policing, immigration
  • State surveillance, including forensic DNA technologies and immigration politics
  • Genetic screening, and the remaking of health risk and at-risk populations
  • Social movements, genetic identities and the dynamics of identity-based activism around health, disability and other issues
  • New genetic identities
  • Genetics and the contestation and remaking of parenting and kinship
  • The geneticisation of sex/gender/sexuality
  • Fairness and equality: how wealth, economic structures, patenting, and the regulation of markets and products influence access to genetic testing and the ability to articulate certain identity claims

Editorial Team
Editor-in-Chief: Christine Hauskeller (University of Exeter)
Co-editors: Gill Haddow (University of Edinburgh), Steve Sturdy (University of Edinburgh) and Richard Tutton (University of Lancaster) 

Conveners of the ESRC Genomics Network stream on Genomics and Identity Politics

Full call for papers:  http://www.britsoc.co.uk/publications/pubsvacancies

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Higher Education Identities

HIGHER EDUCATION IDENTITIES, CULTURES AND PRACTICES

SRHE Higher Educational Policy Network

Tuesday 11th October 4-6.30pm, Room T1-20, London Metropolitan University

Higher education identities, cultures and practices: a changing policy context

The higher education sector in the UK is experiencing dramatic change. The financial crisis, a change of government and ongoing developments in the positioning and role of higher education institutions present new challenges for those who work in universities. This seminar will explore the implications of these changes for academic and professional identities, cultures and practices.

 

Dr Celia Whitchurch, Institute of Education, University of London    

Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education – Expanding the Parameters of Academia

In a context in which academics are increasingly working across multiple constituencies and with internal and external partners, this paper explores the factors that influence individuals to take on such work. It considers the impact on academic identities and career paths and the implications for institutions of more complex roles and relationships.

Dr Jill Jameson, University of Greenwich

Changing Leadership Identities: the Role of Trust and Organisational Cultures in a Recessionary UK Higher Education Policy Context

This paper considers how changing leadership values, trust and organisational cultures impact upon the identities of academic, professional and corporate leaders in HE. It also explores how the academic and intellectual aspects of HE leadership identities can be strengthened and trust rebuilt to fulfil the complex purposes of universities.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.  SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

Interested in joining the HEP Network – but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, Tel: +44 20 7447 2525, Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

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Capitorg

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

 

Venue: SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL

Date: Thursday 14th July 2011

From 1pm- 4pm (lunch available from 12:30pm)

 

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

 

Ethical dilemmas in widening participation: issues of pedagogy and identity

Dr Jacqueline Stevenson, Leeds Metropolitan University

For more than a decade various governmental policy initiatives have been implemented in the UK to increase the number of students attending higher education. However, whilst these initiatives have been widely critiqued there has been almost no consideration as to the ethical implications of widening participation. This is a significant omission since both WP policy and practice give rise to serious ethical concerns, not least being whether we should continue to increase access to HE at all knowing that many widening participation students are more likely to drop out, get worse degrees, graduate with higher levels of debt and be less employable post-graduation than their peers. Drawing on issues of pedagogy, student support and both staff and student identities, this presentation will act as a ‘think-piece’ offering an opportunity to consider the implications of widening participation from both an ‘ethics of justice’ and ‘ethics of care’ perspective. 

 

Widening Participation and the Capability Approach

Dr Michael F. Watts, University of Cambridge

This paper uses the capability approach to address the ethics of the widening participation agenda.  The capability approach de-emphasises the significance of commodities (including educational commodities) in favour of the opportunities they enable in pursuit of the good life.  It demands a context-based understanding of how the socio-cultural circumstances of young people influence the real opportunities they have to recognise the value of and engage with higher education.  This more nuanced engagement with the concept of well-being recognises that the inevitability of human diversity generates different realisations of the good life.  It also enables engagement with the adaptation of preferences that continue to bedevil attempts to increase access to higher education.  The focus on freedom, illustrated here with reference to a number of empirical studies, frames a more just approach to widening participation that is concerned with what young people have rather than what they lack. 

 

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   Please include the name of your institution and whether you are an SRHE or UALL member.

Cost:

SRHE members: free

UALL members: £25

All Non members: £40

Payment can be made by cheque (made payable SRHE and sent to SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL ) or phone through with credit card details.  Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance given by 7 July 2011.

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel: +44 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

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Hilton Reading Postone

‘I AM AN AMERICAN’: FILMING THE FEAR OF DIFFERENCE – CINDY WEBER

Book Announcement: Cindy Weber, ‘I am An American’: Filming the Fear of Difference’

Dear colleagues

With apologies for cross-posting and a request to circulate this to others who might be interested:

‘I am An American’ Filming the Fear of Difference, by Professor Cynthia Weber, University of Sussex

Exploring the politics of fear, national identity, citizenship, culture and democracy through film. Part history, part political theory, part memoir, part ‘how to’ with regard to research and film-making. With over 150 color images, 223 pages.  Accompanied by a series of films. A website offering free access to all the films discussed in the book will be launched later this summer.

Review
”An unsentimental journey through America. Whatever kind of American you are, or however well you think you know Americans, this book is an eye-opener. I couldn’t put it down.”— Joanna Bourke, Birkbeck College, University of London

Summary
From Samuel Huntington’s highly controversial Who Are We? to the urgent appeal of Naomi Wolf’s The End of America, Americans are increasingly reflecting on questions of democracy, multiculturalism, and national identity. Yet such debates take place largely at the level of elites, leaving out ordinary American citizens who have much to offer about the lived reality behind the phrase, I am an American.

Cynthia Weber set out on a journey across post-9/11 America in search of a deeper understanding of what it means to be an American today. The result is this brave and captivating memoir that gives a voice to ordinary citizens for whom the terrorist attacks of 2001 and their lingering aftermath live on in collective memory. Heartrending first-person testimonials reveal how the ongoing fear of terrorists and immigrants has betrayed Americas core values of fairness and equality, which have been further weakened by polarizing international and domestic responses. Considered together, these portraits also provide a sharp contrast to the idealized vision of Americanness frequently spun by media and politicians.

Far more than a mere remembrance book about September 11, I Am An American offers precisely the kind of ground level empathy needed to reignite a meaningful national debate about who we are and who we might become as a people and a nation.

Available from Intellect Books, UK and University of Chicago Press, USA:
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/books/view-Book,id=4770/
http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo11339518.html

END*****

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Sociology

AFRICAN-CENTERED SOCIOLOGY

Call for Papers

Special Issue of Critical Sociology

Critical Sociology (http://crs.sagepub.com) invites papers for a special edition on African-centered / Africana Sociology. Africana Sociology critically investigates and interrogates the social worlds of people of African descent from African-centered theoretical and/or methodological perspectives. This special edition seeks articles that address the major issues of identity, education, health, criminal justice, sexuality/gender, methodology, racism/oppression, religion/spirituality and intellectual history.

Despite the fact that this special issue is targeted at a sociological audience, we wish to encourage papers that have sociological import in the areas delineated below written by sociologists and others, recognizing that critical African-centered perspectives may be interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary in nature.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to) the following:
· The rationale for African-centered Sociology
· Definitions and conceptual models/orientations in African-centered Sociology
· History of the development of African-centered Sociology
· African-centered Sociology in literature
· The relationship between African spirituality/philosophy and African-centered Sociology
· Media images and Africana identity
· Sexuality and sexism in Africana communities from an African-centered perspective
· The training of Africa-centered sociologists
· The social viability of African-centered Sociology

We also welcome book review essays of recent and new publications within the domain of African-centered/Africana Sociology (contact cs_reviews@sagepub.co.uk for more information).

The selection criteria will involve: relevance to theme, clarity of paper, intellectual significance, and originality. Please send a 250 word abstract by July 1st to Dr. Nikitah Okembe-RA Imani, with full paper expected by September 1st. Solicited manuscripts (approximately 10,000 words) must be submitted to http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/critical-sociology (further instructions will follow with the notification that your abstract has been accepted).

Contact:

Dr. Nikitah Okember-RA Imani, Special Issue Editor
Email: imanino@jmu.edu

============

Professor David Fasenfest
Department of Sociology
Editor, Critical Sociology
http://crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor, Studies in Critical Social Sciences
http://www.brill.nl/scss

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