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Education, Equality and Human Rights

EDUCATION, EQUALITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS – MIKE COLE – BOOK LAUNCH

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK LAUNCH

Education, Equality and Human Rights: Rights: Issues of Gender, ‘Race’, Sexuality, Disability and Social Class – Edited by Mike Cole

Professor Mike Cole, is a Professor of Education at the University of East London, UK

This event will be held at: The Cass School of Education and Communities, Room RB.G.13, Stratford Campus, University of East London, Water Lane, London, E15 4LZ

On: 31 January 2018, at 17.00-19.00

 

 

The fourth edition of Education, Equality and Human Rights has been fully updated to reflect the economic, political, social and cultural changes in educational and political policy and practice, as austerity continues and in the light of the EU referendum. Written by a carefully selected group of experts, each of the five equality issues of gender, ‘race’, sexuality, disability and social class are covered as areas in their own right as well as in relation to education.

Key issues explored include:

  • Human rights, equality and education
  • Women and equality, historically and now
  • Gender and education perspectives throughout time
  • Racism in the UK from the Empire to the present
  • Racism and education from imperial times to the May government
  • The making and remaking of sexualities
  • The challenges surrounding teaching and learning about sexuality in schools
  • The struggle for disability equality
  • Inclusive education
  • Social class, Marxism and socialism
  • Social class inequality and education.

With an uncompromising and rigorous analysis of education and human rights and a foreword from Professor Peter McLarenEducation, Equality and Human Rights is an essential resource across a wide range of disciplines and for all those interested in education, social policy and human rights.

 

Mike Cole is Professor of Education at the University of East London, UK.

His latest books are Racism: A Critical Analysis (2016); Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response, Revised Second Edition (2017), and New Developments in Critical Race Theory and Education: Revisiting Racialized Capitalism and Socialism in Austerity (2017).

 

The Contributors:

Simon Forrest is Professor of Social Sciences in Medicine and Head of the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health at Durham University. He has a background in school teaching and research related to young people’s sexual lifestyles, risks, relationships and identities. He has co-authored a book supporting teaching about homosexuality in the context of schools, Talking About Homosexuality in the Secondary School (AVERT, 1997), and has since published numerous papers and other articles in the field of young people’s sexual attitudes and lifestyles. He is Chair of the Board of Trustees at AVERT, a leading global AIDS charity, and contributes to local and national initiatives aiming to support boys and young men.

Jane Kelly taught Art History and Women’s Studies at Kingston University until she retired in 2002. Since then she has been involved in Southwark Day Centre for Asylum Seekers which has three day centres, each open one day a week. In addition, she has recently rejoined the Labour Party.

Alpesh Maisuria is a Senior Lecturer with an expertise in social class and educational policy. His current research is based on the neoliberalisation of education in England, drawing upon Marxism and critical realism to understand these developments as ideologically driven. He also has an interest in Swedish social democracy and communism and education policy. He is also Deputy Editor of the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS).

Jane Martin is Professor of Social History of Education at the University of Birmingham. Her first book, Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England, won the History of Education Society (UK) Book Prize in 2002. She has published widely in various international journals in the field of gender and education, history of education, sociology of education and women’s history. She is joint editor of the Routledge Progressive Education Series. Her most recent book is Making SocialistsMary Bridges Adams and the Fight for Knowledge and Power, 1855–1939 (Manchester University Press, 2013). Future publications include Gender and Education in England since 1770: A social history to be published in the Palgrave Macmillan Gender and Women’s History Series in 2018; and a biography of author, teacher and socialist Caroline Benn (1926–2000).

Peter McLaren is Distinguished Professor in Critical Studies, College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, where he serves as Co-Director of the Paulo Freire Democratic Project and International Ambassador for Global Ethics and Social Justice. He is also Honorary Chair Professor at Northeast Normal University, China, where he serves as Honorary Co-Director of the Center for Critical Pedagogy Research. Professor McLaren is the author and editor of 45 books, and his writings have been translated into 30 languages.

Richard Rieser is a disabled teacher, trainer, writer, speaker, campaigner, film maker, and an international advocate/consultant for inclusive education and disability equality in many countries around the world. He runs World of Inclusion Ltd (www.worldofinclusion.com). As a disabled teacher, Richard taught for 25 years in primary, secondary, FE, and lastly as an Advisory Teacher for Inclusion in the London Borough of Hackney. After this he became full-time Director of the charity Disability Equality in Education, which trained over 120,000 education professionals. All Richard’s work is prompted by disability equality, inclusion and the social model of disability. Richard was UKDPC representative at the Ad hoc Committee framing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. He is author of the only handbook on implementing Article 24: Inclusive Education, for the Commonwealth. He has held many positions, including UK Rep on the European Disability Forum from 2004 to 2012, Chair of the Alliance for Inclusive Education and Vice Chair of Council for Disabled Children for 12 years and on various UK government committees. He is Coordinator of UK Disability History Month (www.ukdhm.org). Recently, World of Inclusion won an award at the Zero Conference, 2016 for a series of anti-disablist bullying films

Education, Equality and Human Rights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Kevin Andersdon

Kevin Andersdon

THE CHARLIE HEBDO ASSASSINATIONS IN GLOBAL CONTEXT: FROM FRANCE TO THE MIDDLE EAST AND BEYOND

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2015

7:00-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

Mansoor M., Iranian cultural worker

Kevin Anderson, author of “Marx at the Margins”

 

On the one hand, the assassination of the editors of French satirical magazine “Charlie Hebdo” needs to be viewed in terms of the danger of ISIS and other radical Islamist groups bent on the destruction of the left and of secular democratic culture. These movements took the world stage with their hijacking of the Iranian revolution of 1979, followed a decade later by Ayatollah Khomeini’s fatwa against Anglo-Indian writer Salman Rushdie, himself from a Muslim background, for allegedly insulting Islam. On the other hand, the recent French events show the results of decades of segregation, discrimination, and police harassment/imprisonment of immigrants of Muslim background from the Middle East and North Africa, and of their descendants. These racist policies have been abetted by Islamophobic, anti-immigrant movements and ideologies. If radical Islamism is a new form of reactionary ideology that can undergird oppressive regimes in the Muslim world, the same is also true of Islamophobia in Europe and other regions, with both of these ideologies feeding on each other. As part of the Left, how can we break this vicious cycle?  How can we build upon the victory of the Kurds of Kobane, Syria against ISIS and that of the leftist Syriza Party in Greece in the face of efforts by a well-funded neofascist party that sought to blame immigrants for the crisis of capitalism?

 

Suggested background reading, available in English, Persian, and Spanish: Kevin Anderson, “The Paris Assassinations in Global Context,” International Marxist-Humanist, Jan. 12, 2015

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

 

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc. http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-charlie-hebdo-assassinations-global-context-france-middle-east-beyond

 

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

Social Alternatives

Social Alternatives

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVES – CALL FOR THEMATIC ISSUES

Dear Colleagues

Social Alternatives is seeking proposals from Guest Editors for Thematic Issues

Social Alternatives: http://socialalternatives.com/contributions

Social Alternatives is an independent, quarterly refereed journal which aims to promote and inform public debate, commentary and dialogue about contemporary social, political, economic and environmental issues.

Social Alternatives analyses, critiques and reviews contemporary social issues and problems. The journal seeks to generate insight, knowledge, and understanding of contemporary circumstances in order to determine local, national, and global implications. We are committed to the principles of social justice and to creating spaces of dialogue intended to stimulate social alternatives to current conditions.

Social Alternatives values the capacity of intellectual and artistic endeavour to prompt imaginative solutions and alternatives and publishes refereed articles, review essays, commentaries and book reviews as well as short stories, poems, images and cartoons.

The journal has grappled with matters of contemporary concern for three decades, publishing articles and themed issues on topics such as: peace and conflict, racism, Indigenous rights, social justice, human rights, inequality and the environment.

If you are interested please send expressions of interest to: julie.matthews@adelaide.edu.au or julie@socialalternatives.com

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Philosophy and Romanticism

Philosophy and Romanticism

ROMANTIC REMAINS

 

MICHAEL NICHOLSON (CHAIR)

SPECIAL SESSION – NASSR 2015

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

 

Remain(s):

To be left behind after the removal, use, or destruction of some part, number, or quantity.

To continue in the same place or with the same person; to abide, to stay.

The survivors of a war, battle, or other destructive event.

A relic of some obsolete custom or practice; a surviving trait or characteristic.

A part or the parts of a person’s body after death; a corpse.

The literary works or fragments (esp. the unpublished ones) left by an author after death

[OED]

 

Romantic culture’s most familiar rhetorics of revolution are progressive, teleological, messianic, and apocalyptic. Building upon the etymology of the term “remain(s)” as a term that denotes survival and persistence as much as death and decay, “Romantic Remains” will consider the whole range of “remain(s)” in relation to “rights” (political, cultural, literary, scientific, environmental, corporeal, and otherwise). This panel will therefore theorize the era’s less critically prominent forms of protest such as stasis, resistance, delay, disappearance, survival, and/or endurance. In a moment whose most prominent poetic works, embodied individual lives, and grand political narratives focus on vigor, life, growth, evolution, and development — Wordsworth’s “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive,” Barbauld’s “Little Invisible Being Who is Expected Soon to Become Visible,” and Shelley’s “Life, Joy, Empire, and Victory”—who or what gets left behind? What radical possibilities lie on the other side of Romanticism’s forward thinkingforms of enthusiasm, passion, utopianism, and optimism?

As the necessary consequence of works such as Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey and Volney’s Ruins, Romantic critics have always taken an interest in Europe’s physical remains. Yet in our present moment of environmental catastrophe and ruin, a diverse array of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholars have drawn new attention to the possibilities and anxieties of contingent, biodegradable, unhurried, and uncertain forms of existence and aesthetics: Kevis Goodman and Jonathan Sachs (slow time), Jonathan Bate and James C. McKusick (Romantic ecology and green writing), Paul Fry (ontological radicalism), Anahid Nersessian (nescience), Anne-Lise François (recessive agency), Timothy Morton (dark ecology), and Jacques Khalip (anonymity and dispossession). In its focus on natural rhythms, formal omissions, and vanishing acts rather than developmental narratives or confident subjects, this panel will turn toward a critique of the idea that Romanticism always proceeds though rapid movement and productive presence. With this end in mind, we will study the period’s conservationist energies in the realms of ontology, politics, and aesthetics—how the positions of remaining behind, moving slowly, and entirely disappearing often allowed Romantic writers to contest the excesses of an increasingly accelerating age focused on imperial expansion, economic development, and sociocultural improvement.

Papers may consider “Romantic Remains” in relation to a wide range of formal, historical, theoretical, and critical concerns, that might include:

–necromanticism / material remains: corpses, ruins, relics, residues, wastes, wrecks, dust, rubble, and debris

–formal remains: elegies, epitaphs, scraps, elisions, gaps, fragments, caesurae, ellipses, and repetitions

–biological / natural processes: decomposition, defilement, deterioration, erosion, putrefaction, and decay

–the poetics of nostalgia / memory and ephemerality / forgetting

–outmoded, suspended, superseded, and left over genres, modes, and personae

–spatial remains: localism, dispossession, immovability, and immobility

–temporal remains: anachronism, haunting, and gradualism

–textual / authorial negotiations of invisibility, abjection, anonymity, disappearance, obscurity, and reanimation

–memorialization and categories of identity such as gender, race, class, sexuality, and disability

–biodegradable / sustainable aesthetics

–scientific and antiquarian analyses of extinction, rebirth, evolution, and survival

–the ruins of Romantic criticism and theory / the remains of Romantic literary history / the afterlives of Romantic writing

 

General Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/cfp/

Special Sessions Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/sessions/

 

GENERAL CALL FOR PAPERS:

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NSSR)

The 23rd Annual NASSR Conference Winnipeg, Manitoba, August 13-16, 2015

Sponsored by University of Manitoba and The University of Winnipeg, NASSR 2015 will meet at the historic Fort Garry Hotel near The Forks in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, from August 13 to 16, 2015.

The theme of the conference is “Romanticism & Rights,” broadly construed to include:

  • Human Rights (racial, indigenous, economic; right to freedom and autonomy [slavery])
  • Animal Rights; Natural Rights, Nature’s rights (the environment)
  • Sexual Rights (alternative genders, women’s rights, procreative rights)
  • Author or Authorial Rights (intellectual property, copyright)
  • State/Sovereign Rights
  • Children’s Rights
  • Right to be heard; Freedom of Speech
  • The Right to Philosophy / Thinking
  • Right to Religion
  • Rights and Wrongs
  • The Right to Die
  • What is left of Rights?

For information on the 2015 NASSR call for papers, including special sessions, click on the “Call for Papers” menu item above.
Conference Co-Chairs:
Michelle Faubert, University of Manitoba
Peter Melville, The University of Winnipeg

Conference Committee:
Linda Dietrick, The University of Winnipeg
Murray Evans, The University of Winnipeg
Joshua D. Lambier, Western University
Dana Medoro, University of Manitoba
Pam Perkins, University of Manitoba
Kathryn Ready, The University of Winnipeg
Armelle St. Martin, University of Manitoba
Contact NASSR 2015: nassr15@umanitoba.ca

NASSR Main Website: http://publish.uwo.ca/~nassr/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

THE MEDES

the medes is a volunteer collective of academic writers, artists, photographers and videographers advocating for social change

About

the medes [thəmēds]

We are an online multimedia publication that seeks to bring honest reporting and emotive art together through innovative media to promote social equality within our community.

Founded in Denver, Colorado in early 2012, the medes is a project of the nonprofit organization, Media Action Network (MAN) and was originally started out of frustration with the lack of coverage in mainstream media on the myriad of social justice issues facing our communities today.

We are run entirely by a volunteer collective. This collective consists of a wide-variety of contributors: writers, researchers, graphic designers, artists, photographers, and videographers. By blending the academic pursuit of social equality with artistic ability, we focus on social justice both from a written and visual perspective. We seek to bring awareness to the gamut of issues – including many in the human rights and environmental categories – which receive little to no attention through conventional media outlets.

the medes is run entirely on volunteer time and donation dollars.  If you would like to be a part of this effort in any form other MAN projects, please visit our contact page or our donate page.

the medes: http://themedes.org/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Sociology

Sociology

4th ANNUAL EQUALITY LECTURE

British Sociological Association

2014 Equality Lecture

Tom Shakespeare on Enabling Equality: from disabling barriers to equal participation

30 May 2014 from 6.00-8.00pm

British Library Conference Centre

London, UK

In this talk, the researcher and disability rights advocate Dr Tom Shakespeare will explore what it takes to achieve equality for disabled people, in the era of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and ‘welfare reform’. Barrier removal and reasonable adjustments make workplaces more accessible, but only if the extra costs which disabled people face are met through state benefits. Because disability is so diverse, ensuring that all disabled people can flourish requires more than simply levelling the playing field. Where next for disability equality?

Tom Shakespeare is a senior lecturer in medical sociology at the University of East Anglia. Previously, he worked at the World Health Organization where he was one of the authors and editors of the World Report on Disability (2011). Author of Disability Rights and Wrongs Revisited (2013) among other publications, Tom has been involved in the disability movement since 1986.

The event will be chaired by Howard Wollman, Chair of the British Sociological Association.

See: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/equality-lecture.aspx

To book a place: http://www.bl.uk/whatson/events/event159848.html

 

Past Lectures

These events are jointly hosted by the British Sociological Association and The British Library and were introduced in 2011.

 

15 April 2013 – The Art of Association: the formation of egalitarian social capital

Danielle Allen

Watch this event

 

25 June 2012 – What’s So Good About Being More Equal?

Professor Danny Dorling, University of Sheffield

Watch this event

 

27 June 2011 – The Spirit Level

Professor Richard Wilkinson, the Equality Trust

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Panopticon

Panopticon

CRITICAL LEGAL CONFERENCE 2014: POWER, CAPITAL, CHAOS

4 – 6 September 2014

University of Sussex

 

Call for Papers

By ‘Power, Capital, Chaos’, we refer to a context of ongoing global economic crisis, the neo-liberal destruction of social democracy and the ever-widening entrenchment of inequalities of wealth, power and technology within and between a global ‘North’ and global ‘South’. A contemporary political situation marked by austerity and privatisation, by security and responsibility, by racist political reaction, class-war and gender-domination.

Yet, this is also a situation marked by manifold acts of protest, struggle, occupation, riot and revolution. All of which demand the reimaging of social, political, juridical and material life. These are modes of resistance that call-out disparate and conflicting visions of the ‘public good’, ‘human dignity’ and ‘justice’. Equally these involve legal and political claims to know-ledge which exist within and contend with a late-modern context of endless critique, scepticism and disagreement. As such, the contemporary theorisation of ‘power’ and ‘capital’ involves critical thought’s confrontation with a certain ‘chaos’ of reason and unreason.

Conference participants are asked to consider how we might attempt to understand, explain and respond to a chaotic contemporary political situation? You are invited to do so on the lovely campus of the University of Sussex set in the chalky South Downs of South-East England. In this respect, one context of the CLC 2014 is the city of Brighton and Hove, which carries on a long tradition of pleasure and distraction. In another, the context is the University of Sussex which holds onto both a radical intellectual tradition and a tradition of radical student protest.

We ask you to make your own interpretation of the theme ‘Power, Capital, Chaos’, and invite scholars from a range of disciplines to propose papers. Traditionally the Critical Legal Conference is a friendly and interdisciplinary conference bringing together scholars from a wide body of disciplines.

Proposals should consist of a short abstract (max. 250 words).

Deadline for Paper Proposals: 30 June, 2014

 

Plenary Speakers

•          Mark Devenney (University of Brighton)

•          Maria Drakpoulou (University of Kent)

•          Denise Ferreira da Silva (Queen Mary)

•          Mark Neocleous (Brunel University)

•          Louiza Odysseos (University of Sussex)

•          Nina Power (University of Roehampton)

 

Conference Streams

•          Beyond the Law: State of Exception and the Powers of Capital

•          Chaotic Property

•          Commodification, Global Capitalism, and Liberal Democracy

•          Critiquing Crime

•          Defend, Occupy or Shut Down? Capital and Chaos in Neoliberal Higher Education

•          Dispossessing the Dispossessed: Legally Sanctified Market Violence

•          Equity in Crisis

•          Identifying the Global South: Law, Power, Subjectivity and Liberation

•          Identity Politics and Human Rights

•          Ideology, Hegemony and Law: An East/West Perspective

•          Law-Capital-Pacification

•          Law’s Humanitarian Sentiments

•          Law and Neo-Liberalism

•          The Law and the Promise of a New World

•          Political Struggle and Performative Rights

•          Rationalities of Legal Decision-Making

•          Spatial Justice and Diaspora: Law, Chaos, and Postcoloniality

•          State in situ? Rethinking the Trial

•          The Symbolic Force of Law and Feminism: A Decolonial Perspective

•          Thinking Resistance Beyond Power, Violence and … Law?

•          General Stream: Power, Capital, Chaos

 

Organisation

The CLC 2014 is hosted by the Sussex Law School, and by the School of Law, Politics and Sociology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

For paper proposals and general information please contact: Kimberley Brayson or Tarik Kochi: clc2014@sussex.ac.uk

 

Conference Fees, including conference dinner, drinks reception, lunch and refreshments

Early-Bird Registration (by 31 July 2014): £180

Late Registration: £200

Reduced Rate (postgraduate): £100

Reduced Rate (postgraduate — Excluding Conference Dinner): £70

 

Further info: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/law/newsandevents/clc

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Feminism

Feminism

ROOMS OF OUR OWN

CONFERENCE ON WOMEN’S SPACES

Women’s Spaces and Feminist Politics: yesterday, today and tomorrow

You are invited to a one-day conference organized by London Women and Planning Forum, Rooms of our Own and Women’s Studies without Walls

FRIDAY 16th MAY 2014, 9.30 for 10.0 – 5.0pm
@ Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Rd, E1 4NS 
Geography Department, First Floor, Room 126

This one-day conference will explore the role of women’s spaces in feminist politics, focusing on women’s centres and other women’s spaces in the past, present and future. During the 1970s there were autonomous women’s centres in most London boroughs and throughout the UK. They provided an exciting, safe and liberating environment for women to share thoughts and experiences and to campaign for change. Many of these centres were funded by local authority grants but as the grant-giving environment diminished most were forced to close. Some have survived by tendering for out-sourced council services such as domestic violence and rape counselling. Many have struggled against the conflation of feminist demands into a generalised equality agenda. During the past decade a new  generation of feminists has started to campaign against the objectification of women in the media, the expansion of pornography, sexism in the workplace and on the street, the lack of representation of women in public life and the sexualisation of young children. This new generation of feminists is largely organized via social media rather than in physical spaces. 

There will be four key sessions.

  1. Why “Women Only”?  Speakers on the history of women’s spaces, lesbian and separatist issues, cultural and religious diversity issues and requirements for women’s safety.
  2. Women’s Spaces past, present and future. A range of speakers looking at Women’s Centres that have closed, those that have survived and ideas for new forms for the future.
  3. Virtual women’s spaces. Speakers from organisations that organise almost exclusively online; benefits and problems.
  4. One hour discussion involving all the speakers and audience chaired by Woman’s Hour’s Jane Garvey, followed by a Networking session

We aim to organise another event following on from this Conference with the opportunity for much more discussion, networking and planning for the future.

Please go to Eventbrite to register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/womens-spaces-and-feminist-politics-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow-tickets-11140033139

£38 for waged +booking fee

£8.50 for unwaged +booking fee  (if this is difficult for you, please email us)

Includes tea/ coffee throughout the day and a vegetarian lunch.
Please let us know if you have particular access and /or dietary requirements
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 6th May 2014
EMAIL CONTACT: womensspaces@gmail.com

Feminism

Feminism

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNDERSTANDING FORCED MARRIAGE AND UNIVERSITY RESPONSES

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Thursday 8 May 2014: 11.30 – 15.45

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Network – Access and Widening Participation Network

 

 

Understanding Forced Marriage: Khatidja Chantler

Drawing on the qualitative components of a research study completed in 2007, this paper presents four key challenges in the forced marriage debate. First, the study illustrates the problematic of defining forced marriage as a distinct and discrete category from arranged marriage. Second, current conceptualisations of forced marriage focus on consent at the entry point into marriage in contrast to survivors of forced marriage, and women’s organisations experienced in providing services to this group, both who attach equal importance to exiting (forced) marriages. Third, within the forced marriage debate, South Asian and Muslim communities are perceived as being largely responsible for forced marriages, whilst our research demonstrates that the range of communities in which forced marriage occurs is much wider. Fourth, forced marriage is often seen as a product of a ‘backward’ culture or religion and bound up with notions of ‘honour’. The narratives of survivors in our study illustrate a much more complex picture in which the interplay between culture, religion, poverty, gender, sexuality and state practices are highly significant in pathways to forced marriage. 

Khatidja Chantler is currently a Reader in the School of Social Work at the University of Central Lancashire, having previously worked at the University of Manchester. My key research interests are around ‘race’ and gender, particularly in relation to violence against women and their intersections with mental health. Prior to academia, I worked in social services and the voluntary sector settings and am also a qualified counsellor and supervisor. Publications include: British, European and International journal articles; book chapters and co-authored books: Attempted Suicide and Self-harm: South Asian Women (2001); Domestic Violence and Minoritisation (2002) and a  co-edited the book Gender & Migration: Feminist Interventions (2010). 

 

University responses to forced marriage and violence against women: Renate Klein and Marilyn Freeman
This talk examines how British universities address incidents of violence against female students, including forced marriage. Interviews with university staff members focused on whether cases of violence against women or forced marriage are coming to the attention of staff, whether staff members feel equipped to deal with them, and whether universities pursue systematic strategies to address theses issues. The goal was to identify what is working well, what could be better, and how universities could become more proactive. Findings suggest that comprehensive institutional responses are rare and that support for students depends largely on the initiative of individual staff members who may or may not have specialist expertise. Misconceptions about disclosure dynamics were common, in particular with regard to FM. In addition to the interviews, keyword searches of the public pages of university websites suggested that as a topic of research or teaching violence against women is often highly visible, whereas as an issue of university policy or governance it remains nearly invisible.

Renate Klein works for LondonMetropolitanUniversity and the University of Maine, USA, and co-ordinates a European research network on gender and violence. Her recent books include an edited international volume on Framing sexual and domestic violence through language (2013), Palgrave Macmillan, and a monographResponding to intimate violence against women: The role of informal networks (2012). CambridgeUniversity Press.

Marilyn Freeman is Emeritus Professor at LondonMetropolitanUniversity, and Co-Director of The International Centre of Family Law, Policy and Practice. Her specialist areas of research relate to international family law and include child abduction, relocation, and forced marriage.

 

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Crisis

Crisis

CRITICAL POLITICAL ECONOMY RESEARCH NETWORK OF THE EUROPEAN SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

Call for Papers – Mid-term conference

Crisis, Resistance and Rights: Critical Political Economy Perspectives

12-13 September 2014, Vienna

The current crisis reveals one of capitalism’s key contradictions: the relationship between rights, the state and society. Giving primacy to austerity politics, governments appear unable to guarantee basic rights vis-à-vis market forces. These developments constitute fundamental challenges to social reproduction. Governments have for example been pro-active in protecting banks’ rights in foreclosures and housing evictions at the expense of people’s right to housing, or imposed labour reforms marking a retreat of labour rights and rights to decent work. Similar trends can be observed with respect to welfare rights, the right to education, the right to water or democratic rights that go beyond ballot boxes, such as the right to protest and claim public spaces. Of particular importance here is also the political ecology dimension, with a focus on the financialisation of nature, enclosure of commons, and the green economy as a new hegemonic project. Resistance movements and civil society organisations/groups increasingly challenge private property rights and demand collective socio-economic and human rights. Academic discussions of rights have long been a prerequisite of liberal political philosophy and received little attention from critical scholars. What can scholars in law, political economy, political science and sociology contribute to a critical understanding of rights? How does an emancipatory conception of rights look like? What are common rights, and/or rights to commons? How could such conceptions add to a critical understanding of crisis and resistance?

This two-day conference in Vienna seeks to explore interlinkages between crisis, resistance and rights in an open, genial and reflexive manner. We are interested in all of the above plus more, and wish for the conference to cover a wide range of topics. As such, we seek contributions from scholars with an interest in political economy research, regardless of their disciplinary affiliation and whether they are in academia or not. We also hope to attract a diverse range of participants, from a variety of countries and backgrounds. To this end, limited funds will be available for assisting PhD and early career scholars, especially those from Central and Eastern Europe, with their travel and accommodation costs.

Abstracts of around 250 words should be submitted to cpern@criticalpoliticaleconomy.net by no later than 1 March 2014. The applicants will be informed of the selection committee’s decision by 1 April 2014.

 

There is no fee for attending and participating in the workshop. The workshop language will be English.

About CPERN

The Critical Political Economy Research Network (CPERN) promotes and facilitates research aimed at understanding recent transformations of capitalism and capitalist societies. The primary focus is on Europe, but CPERN is in no way restricted to just this part of the world. CPERN’s purpose is to reassert the centrality of political economy perspectives and to promote critical and emancipatory scholarship. It is a hub for interdisciplinary exchange, straddling principally the disciplines of sociology, politics and economics, but also reaching out to geography, social policy and law.

Critical Political Economy Research Network: http://criticalpoliticaleconomy.net/

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-cpern-mid-term-conference-crisis-resistance-and-rights-critical-political-economy-perspectives

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Philosophy

Philosophy

ROYAL INSTITUTE OF PHILOSOPHY & THE PHILOSOPHY PROGRAMME OF PUBLIC LECTURES AT ROEHAMPTON UNIVERSITY

Autumn 2013 Series All welcome! Please come!

Tuesday October 15th 5pm – 6.30 pm
Dr William Lewis (Skidmore College) 
‘Trace, Testimony,Verity: Representing Reality with Documentary Film’ 
Roehampton University, Main Campus, Duchesne Building Room 001 

Tuesday November 12th 5pm – 6.30 pm
Dr Sarah Richmond (University College London)
‘Gender in Sartre’s Being and Nothingness’
Roehampton University, Main Campus, Duchesne Building Room 001

Tuesday November 26th 5pm – 6.30 pm
Dr Sarah Fine (King’s College London) 
‘This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: Territory, Borders, and Immigration’ 
Roehampton University, Main Campus, Duchesne Building Room 001

WEDNESDAY December 4th 5pm – 6.30 pm (note: different day from other lectures)
Dr Kelvin Knight (London Metropolitan University)
‘MacIntyre’s Critique of Kant on History and Human Rights’ 
Roehampton University, Main Campus, Duchesne Building Room 209 
(note different room from other lectures)

All lectures take place on the main campus of Roehampton University, Roehampton Lane, London SW15 5PH

 

Royal Institute of Philosophy: http://royalinstitutephilosophy.org/

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Economics

Economics

LABOR AND WORKING-CLASS HISTORY SEMINAR

CALL FOR PAPERS

2013–2014 Academic Year
Call for Papers

The Labor and Working-Class History Seminar at Roosevelt House, Hunter College, City University of New York seeks proposals for seminar papers that explore the rich and diverse spectrum of labor history and working-class life. Essays may focus on workers’ agency, culture, and lived experiences; class dynamics as informed by other social categories and identities; changes in political economy and their effects on workers’ lives; the expansion and reduction of governmental policies promoting economic security and other forms of social welfare; and other related topics.

The Labor and Working-Class History Seminar will be an on-going colloquium for a broad academic audience, including graduate students, faculty members, and independent scholars. We will meet at the historic Roosevelt House twice a semester during the 2013–2014 academic year, on selected Tuesdays from 6:00–8:00 p.m. At each meeting, an invited presenter will offer an overview of a scholarly work, pre-circulated electronically to all participants, and a commentator will provide constructive feedback. The exchange between the presenter and commentator will be followed by a discussion among all seminar attendees.

The Labor and Working-Class History seminar, while focused on history, welcomes scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including human rights studies, public policy studies, sociology, anthropology, literature, law, and environmental studies. We encourage cross-disciplinary discussion, and invite proposals from diverse subject areas and approaches.

Interested scholars who would like to present a portion of their current research on labor and/or class should submit a one page abstract and a brief cv to: Donna Haverty-Stacke and Eduardo Contreras at laborsem@hunter.cuny.edu by August 1, 2013. Decisions will be communicated by September 1, 2013 to all those who have submitted abstracts.

We have a limited fund to support regional travel but are unable to provide funding for long-distance travel or lodging. If you would like to be placed on the email list to receive announcements of upcoming presentations, please write to: laborsem@hunter.cuny.edu.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-labor-and-working-class-history-seminar-at-roosevelt-house-hunter-college-cuny

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski