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101 Changemakers

101 CHANGEMAKERS: REBELS AND RADICALS WHO CHANGED U.S. HISTORY

Celebrating the Extraordinary History of Ordinary People, Haymarket Books Launches

101 Changemakers: Rebels and Radicals Who Changed US History

A Nonfiction Book for 5th-8th grade students |  Launch event features Changemakers Bhairavi Desai of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance and Barbara Young of the National Domestic Workers Alliance; with editor Dao X. Tran | Moderated by contributing author Brian Jones

Saturday, November 3, 2012
3:00 to 5:00 pm at the Puck Building, 4th Floor, 295 Lafayette Street at Houston | On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/281346175317181/

Cosponsored by the CUNY PhD Program in Urban Education, IndyKids, National Domestic Workers Alliance, New York Collective of Radical Educators, Teaching for Change  and Voices of a People’s History

IN THE GREAT tradition of Howard Zinn, 101 Changemakers offers a “people’s history” version of the individuals who have shaped our country, for middle school students. In the place of founding fathers, presidents, and titans of industry are profiles of those who courageously fought for social justice in the United States, providing young students with new ways of understanding how history is written—and made. As the editors write:

For too many young people, history is just plain boring. History can seem like it is all about random dates and facts about powerful kings and important presidents making long-winded speeches. History can appear to be about events that happened so far in the past that they seem to have no connection to our world today. It doesn’t have to be this way. History should be exciting. It should be thrilling. It tells us the greatest stories ever told, and those stories contain lessons from the past that can help us create a better future. But we can only do that if we know who really made our history—and what exactly they did.

Changemakers include Tecumseh, Harriet Tubman, Mark Twain, Mother Jones, Fred Korematsu, Cesar Chavez, Rachel Carson, Muhammad Ali, Gloria Steinem, Harvey Milk, and many more—including the following book launch speakers:

Bhairavi Desai, a native of India, has been organizing taxi drivers since 1996. She is the cofounder and executive director of the 15,000-member New York Taxi Workers Alliance (NYTWA) since 1998. Through organizing, direct action, legal and health services, media presence, political advocacy and the cultivation of allies and supporters—NYTWA, a multiethnic, multigenerational union—builds power for one of the most vulnerable and visible immigrant workforces in the city of New York.

Barbara Young was a domestic worker for seventeen years, and is well acquainted with both the exploitation domestic workers face—and the potential of domestic workers to organize for lasting change. She is an active member of Domestic Workers United (DWU), one of the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA)’s founding affiliate organizations, and has provided consistent and inspiring leadership for the NDWA since its foundation.

Michele Bollinger lives in Washington, DC, where she teaches high school social studies.

Dao X. Tran is an editor based in the Bronx, New York. Dao is currently working on the Domestic Worker Oral History Project.

For additional book information, please visit Haymarket Books
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/hc/101-Changemakers

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/101-changemakers-rebels-and-radicals-who-changed-us-history-book-launch-3-november-nyc

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The Black Rock

THE AMERICAN ROAD TO CAPITALISM

The American Road to Capitalism: Studies in Class-Structure, Economic Development and Political Conflict, 1620–1877

By Charles Post
Publication year: 2011
See: http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=44822

Series:
Historical Materialism Book Series, 28
ISBN-13 (i):
978 90 04 20104 0
ISBN-10:
90 04 20104 1
Hardback
Number of pages:
xvii, 300 pp.
List price: € 99.00 / US$ 141.00

Most US historians assume that capitalism either “came in the first ships” or was the inevitable result of the expansion of the market. Unable to analyze the dynamics of specific forms of social labour in the antebellum US, most historians of the US Civil War have privileged autonomous political and ideological factors, ignoring the deep social roots of the conflict. This book applies theoretical insights derived from the debates on the transition to capitalism in Europe to the historical literature on the US to produce a new analysis of the origins of capitalism in the US, and the social roots of the Civil War.

Charles Post, Ph. D. (1983) in Sociology, SUNY-Binghamton, is Associate Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College-CUNY. He has published in New Left Review, Journal of Peasant Studies, Journal of Agrarian Change, Against the Current and Historical Materialism.

“Explaining the origin and early development of American capitalism is a particularly challenging task. It is in some ways even more difficult than in other cases to strike the right historical balance, capturing the systemic imperatives of capitalism, and explaining how they emerged, while doing justice to historical particularities… To confront these historical complexities requires both a command of historical detail and a clear theoretical grasp of capitalism’s systemic imperatives, a combination that is all too rare. Charles Post succeeds in striking that difficult balance, which makes his book a major contribution to truly historical scholarship.” — Ellen Meiksins-Wood, York University, author of The Origins of Capitalism: A Long View.

“In The American Road to Capitalism, Charles Post offers a brilliant reinterpretation of the origins and diverging paths of economic evolution in the American north and south. The first systematic historical materialist account of US development from the colonial period through the civil war in a very long time, it is sure to be received as a landmark contribution.” — Robert P. Brenner, University of California-Los Angeles, author of Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Early Modern Europe and Merchants and Revolution: Commercial Change, Political Conflict, and London’s Overseas Traders, 1550-1653.

“Charles Post has written an excellent book on the origins of American capitalism in the antebellum North, on plantation slavery in the Old South and on the cataclysmic conflict between them. His interpretation is bold and controversial; it will have to be considered by all scholars in the field.” — John Ashworth, University of Nottingham, author of Slavery, Capitalism and the Antebellum Republic

“This is the most original and provocative materialist interpretation of the origins and dynamics of US capitalism for a long time. Post combines impressive command of the historical sources with a sharp analytical understanding, not least of the centrality of agrarian questions to the development of capitalism.” — Henry Bernstein, University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies and China Agricultural University, Beijing, emeritus editor Journal of Agrarian Change.

“Over the past three decades, Charles Post has been developing an original and powerful interpretation of the American road to capitalism. This volume brings together his most important essays in what is sure to be a landmark volume. Post brilliantly analyzes the structural basis of economic development in both the North and the South, culminating in a powerful interpretation of the social basis of the Civil War. The book is one of the best examples of historical sociology that I have seen in recent years, effortlessly melding theory and historical research. This is engaged scholarship of the highest order.” — Vivek Chibber, New York University, author of Locked In Place: State Building and Late Industrialization in India.

Table of contents:

Foreword by Ellen Meiksins Wood
Introduction

1. The American Road to Capitalism
i. Plantation-slavery
ii. Agrarian petty-commodity production
iii. Capitalist manufacture and industry
iv. Conclusion: the Civil War

2. The Agrarian Origins of US Capitalism: The Transformation of the Northern Countryside before the Civil War
i. Rural class-structure in the North before the Civil War
ii. Debating the transformation of northern agriculture
iii. The transformation of the northern countryside, c. 1776–1861

3. Plantation-Slavery and Economic Development in the Antebellum Southern United States
i. The ‘planter-capitalism’ model
ii. The ‘non-bourgeois civilisation’ model
iii. Class-structure and economic development in the antebellum-South

4. Agrarian Class-Structure and Economic Development in Colonial British North America: The Place of the American Revolution in the Origins of US Capitalism
i. The commercialisation-staples model
ii. The demographic-frontier model
iii. Agrarian social-property relations in colonial British North America
iv. Colonial economic development, the American Revolution, and the development of capitalism in the US, 1776–1861

5. Social-Property Relations, Class-Conflict and the Origins of the US Civil War: Toward a New Social Interpretation
i. Ashworth’s social interpretation of the US Civil War
ii. A critique of slavery, capitalism and politics in the antebellum-republic
iii. Toward a new social interpretation of the US Civil War

Conclusion: Democracy against Capitalism in the Post-Civil-War United States
i. Democracy against capitalism in the North: radicalism, class-struggle and the rise of liberal democracy, 1863–77
ii. Democracy against capitalism in the South: the rise and fall of peasant-citizenship, 1865–77
iii. The defeat of populism, ‘Jim Crow’ and the establishment of capitalist plantation-agriculture in the South, 1877–1900

References
Index

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