Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Historical Sociology

Global Capitalism

SPECTRUM JOURNAL OF GLOBAL STUDIES CONFERENCE

Reminder:  CALL FOR PAPERS

First Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference: ‘Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations’

This is a reminder that the deadline to propose a paper or panel for the November 2012 Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference is 1 July, 2012.

The Spectrum Conference will be held in Ankara, Turkeyat the Middle East Technical University from 2-3 November 2012.

Proposals are invited on the conference theme Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations.

Featured speakers at the conference will include in alphabetical order:

Adam Morton, University of Nottingham, U.K.

Bastiaan van Apeldoorn, VU University of Amsterdam, Netherland

Benno Teschke, University of Sussex, U.K.

Gonzalo Pozo, University College, London, U.K.

Hannes Lacher, York University, Canada

Jonathan Joseph, Rutherford College, University of Kent, U.K.

Kamran Matin, University of Sussex, U.K.

Neil Davidson, University of Strathclyde, U.K.

Stephen Hobden, Universityof East London, U.K.

Please see the conference website for application and information:

www.spectrumjournalofglobalstudies.net/conf

Guidelines for Participants:

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an ‘American’ social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR. Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, ahistorical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the ‘international’. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require desconstruction and dereification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly wellcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that adress the following issues and similar topics.

How does a historical materialist geopolitics adress the traditional issues of IR?

1.    Geopolitics of state formations

2.    What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?

3.    In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?

4.    What are the limits and the potentials of the theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?

5.    Historical matarialist analysis of international law

6.    Contemporary forms of imperialism

7.    International state apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital

8.    Marx’s method and the world market

9.    Global protest movements and the Arab Spring

10.  Gramscian analysis of global transformations

11.  Historical Sociology of the Middle East and the Balkans

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the ‘international’.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.

Check back often for updates through out the coming months!

Inquiries to the program chairs should be directed to: spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Capitalism

Capitalism

THE AMERICAN ROAD TO CAPITALISM – BY CHARLES POST

Wednesday, 11 April 2012, 5:30 – 7:00 PM

@ University Press Books, 2430 Bancroft Way (between Telegraph and Dana), Berkeley, CA  

Charles Post speaks on his new book:

The American Road to Capitalism: Studies in Class Structure, Economic Development and Political Conflict, 1620-1877

Shortlisted for the 2011 Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize

“Charles Post’s new book, The American Road to Capitalism,is sure to become a reference point for debates among historians and Marxists about the transformation of the English colonies into the fully developed capitalist United States. […] it should be widely read, appreciated for its insights and rigor, and also debated.” — Ashley Smith, International Socialist Review

“This is a thoughtful, learned, stimulating, challenging and altogether valuable volume. It reprints a series of reflections by the Marxist sociologist Charles Post on various aspects of the rise and evolution of capitalism in North America between the colonial era and the late 19th century. The book is anchored in a wide-ranging study of (and it duly credits) the work of generations of historians.” — Bruce Levine, author of Confederate Emancipation: Southern Plans to Free and Arm Slaves during the Civil War, in Against the Current

“Explaining the origin and early development of American capitalism is a particularly challenging task. It is in some ways even more difficult than in other cases to strike the right historical balance, capturing the systemic imperatives of capitalism, and explaining how they emerged, while doing justice to historical particularities – To confront these historical complexities requires both a command of historical detail and a clear theoretical grasp of capitalism’s systemic imperatives, a combination that is all too rare. Charles Post succeeds in striking that difficult balance, which makes his book a major contribution to truly historical scholarship.” — Ellen Meiksins-Wood, York University, author of The Origins of Capitalism: A Long View.

Unable to analyze the dynamics of specific forms of social labour in the antebellum U.S., most historians of the US Civil War have ignored its deep social roots. To search out these roots, Post applies the theoretical insights from the transition debates to the historical literature on the U.S.to produce a new analysis of the origins of American capitalism.

Charles Post Ph. D. (1983) in Sociology, SUNY-Binghamton, is Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College-CUNY. He has published in New Left Review, Journal of Peasant Studies, Journal of Agrarian Change, Against the Current and Historical Materialism.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Luddites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY & INTERNATIONAL THEORY – BISA WORKSHOP

BISA working group on Historical Sociology and IR
Centre for Advanced International Theory, University of Sussex

The Historical Sociology of International Theory
One day workshop
Thursday 13th September 2012

The discipline of International Relations is home to a wide range of theoretical approaches and its history is characterized by (metaphorical) debates and competition between these theories. This theoretical pluralism R11; deplored by some and celebrated by others – does not only concern the substantive claims of particular theories but also the conception of theory itself. This refers us back to debates in the philosophy of social science. What counts as theory, what role theory can and should play and how it best fulfils this task is not a settled question in IR.

Moreover, inasmuch as the emergence and development of different theories is strongly influenced by their historical and sociological context, the same is true for conceptions of theory itself. Hence, the  considerable recent changes within the international system – from the end of bipolarity, through the ideological hegemony of market democracy, radical fluctuation in the world economy, to open challenges to the institution of sovereignty – can be expected to affect the conception of theory (and consequently the development of theories) itself. This workshop seeks to explore the ways in which time and place impact on the conception of international theory and to develop an understanding of the nature of international theory and its implications at the beginning of the 21st century.

To this end, we invite papers that analyze the emergence, development, change and implications of conceptions of international theory from a historical sociological perspective. We are particularly, but not solely, interested in contributions that:

·  Reflect on the connection between time, place and conceptions of theory;
·  Provide an historical and sociological account of the development of conceptions of international theories;
·  Explore the implications of recent changes in the international system for conceptions of international theory;
·  And, conversely, investigate the impact of conceptions of international theory on our understanding of the broader historical and sociological context.

Those interested in presenting papers at the workshop should send brief abstracts (no more than 200 words) to: cait@sussex.ac.uk. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 13th June 2012.

BISA: http://www.bisa.ac.uk/

**END**

Luddites

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Sociology

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Spectrum Journal of Global Studies
Conference on:
Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations

November 1-3, 2012
Middle East Technical University
Department of International Relations
Ankara – Turkey

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an “ American” social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR.

Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, a-historical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the “international”. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require deconstruction and de-reification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly welcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that address the following issues and similar topics:

    • How does a historical materialist geopolitics address the traditional issues of IR?
    • Geopolitics of state formations
    • What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?
    • In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?
    • What are the limits and the potentials of he theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?
    • Historical materialist analysis of international law
    • Contemporary forms of imperialism
    • International State Apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital
    • Marx’s method and the world market

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the “international”.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum journal or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.
Key note speakers for the conference will later be announced.

For more information and to submit your papers and panel proposals, please contact spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Black Rock

THE AMERICAN ROAD TO CAPITALISM

The American Road to Capitalism: Studies in Class-Structure, Economic Development and Political Conflict, 1620–1877

By Charles Post
Publication year: 2011
See: http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=44822

Series:
Historical Materialism Book Series, 28
ISBN-13 (i):
978 90 04 20104 0
ISBN-10:
90 04 20104 1
Hardback
Number of pages:
xvii, 300 pp.
List price: € 99.00 / US$ 141.00

Most US historians assume that capitalism either “came in the first ships” or was the inevitable result of the expansion of the market. Unable to analyze the dynamics of specific forms of social labour in the antebellum US, most historians of the US Civil War have privileged autonomous political and ideological factors, ignoring the deep social roots of the conflict. This book applies theoretical insights derived from the debates on the transition to capitalism in Europe to the historical literature on the US to produce a new analysis of the origins of capitalism in the US, and the social roots of the Civil War.

Charles Post, Ph. D. (1983) in Sociology, SUNY-Binghamton, is Associate Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College-CUNY. He has published in New Left Review, Journal of Peasant Studies, Journal of Agrarian Change, Against the Current and Historical Materialism.

“Explaining the origin and early development of American capitalism is a particularly challenging task. It is in some ways even more difficult than in other cases to strike the right historical balance, capturing the systemic imperatives of capitalism, and explaining how they emerged, while doing justice to historical particularities… To confront these historical complexities requires both a command of historical detail and a clear theoretical grasp of capitalism’s systemic imperatives, a combination that is all too rare. Charles Post succeeds in striking that difficult balance, which makes his book a major contribution to truly historical scholarship.” — Ellen Meiksins-Wood, York University, author of The Origins of Capitalism: A Long View.

“In The American Road to Capitalism, Charles Post offers a brilliant reinterpretation of the origins and diverging paths of economic evolution in the American north and south. The first systematic historical materialist account of US development from the colonial period through the civil war in a very long time, it is sure to be received as a landmark contribution.” — Robert P. Brenner, University of California-Los Angeles, author of Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Early Modern Europe and Merchants and Revolution: Commercial Change, Political Conflict, and London’s Overseas Traders, 1550-1653.

“Charles Post has written an excellent book on the origins of American capitalism in the antebellum North, on plantation slavery in the Old South and on the cataclysmic conflict between them. His interpretation is bold and controversial; it will have to be considered by all scholars in the field.” — John Ashworth, University of Nottingham, author of Slavery, Capitalism and the Antebellum Republic

“This is the most original and provocative materialist interpretation of the origins and dynamics of US capitalism for a long time. Post combines impressive command of the historical sources with a sharp analytical understanding, not least of the centrality of agrarian questions to the development of capitalism.” — Henry Bernstein, University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies and China Agricultural University, Beijing, emeritus editor Journal of Agrarian Change.

“Over the past three decades, Charles Post has been developing an original and powerful interpretation of the American road to capitalism. This volume brings together his most important essays in what is sure to be a landmark volume. Post brilliantly analyzes the structural basis of economic development in both the North and the South, culminating in a powerful interpretation of the social basis of the Civil War. The book is one of the best examples of historical sociology that I have seen in recent years, effortlessly melding theory and historical research. This is engaged scholarship of the highest order.” — Vivek Chibber, New York University, author of Locked In Place: State Building and Late Industrialization in India.

Table of contents:

Foreword by Ellen Meiksins Wood
Introduction

1. The American Road to Capitalism
i. Plantation-slavery
ii. Agrarian petty-commodity production
iii. Capitalist manufacture and industry
iv. Conclusion: the Civil War

2. The Agrarian Origins of US Capitalism: The Transformation of the Northern Countryside before the Civil War
i. Rural class-structure in the North before the Civil War
ii. Debating the transformation of northern agriculture
iii. The transformation of the northern countryside, c. 1776–1861

3. Plantation-Slavery and Economic Development in the Antebellum Southern United States
i. The ‘planter-capitalism’ model
ii. The ‘non-bourgeois civilisation’ model
iii. Class-structure and economic development in the antebellum-South

4. Agrarian Class-Structure and Economic Development in Colonial British North America: The Place of the American Revolution in the Origins of US Capitalism
i. The commercialisation-staples model
ii. The demographic-frontier model
iii. Agrarian social-property relations in colonial British North America
iv. Colonial economic development, the American Revolution, and the development of capitalism in the US, 1776–1861

5. Social-Property Relations, Class-Conflict and the Origins of the US Civil War: Toward a New Social Interpretation
i. Ashworth’s social interpretation of the US Civil War
ii. A critique of slavery, capitalism and politics in the antebellum-republic
iii. Toward a new social interpretation of the US Civil War

Conclusion: Democracy against Capitalism in the Post-Civil-War United States
i. Democracy against capitalism in the North: radicalism, class-struggle and the rise of liberal democracy, 1863–77
ii. Democracy against capitalism in the South: the rise and fall of peasant-citizenship, 1865–77
iii. The defeat of populism, ‘Jim Crow’ and the establishment of capitalist plantation-agriculture in the South, 1877–1900

References
Index

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism

UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to announce that Queen Mary’s Centre for the Study of Global Security and Development will be hosting a symposium on ‘Uneven and Combined Development and Contemporary World Politics’ on Wednesday, Februaury 9, 2011 between 2-6pm.

The programme is below. If you wish to attend please contact Rick Saull – r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk – in advance of the symposium.

Regards,
Rick Saull
Director, Queen Mary, Centre for the Study of Global Security and
Development

Symposium on UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Wednesday, February 9, 2-6pm (room Arts G.02), Queen Mary, Mile End Campus, London, E1 4NS

Programme/Presenters

Session 1, 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Alex Anievas (Cambridge)
‘Origins and Extensions of Uneven and Combined Development in the History and Theory of International Relations: The Case of the First World War’ This paper aims to contribute to recent debates on ‘international historical sociology’ specifically regarding the potential utility of Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) in advancing a theory of modern inter-state conflict. The paper first re-examines recent debates over the theoretical status of U&CD considering, in particular, the various socio-historical and spatial registers covered by the idea as deployed by the different positions within the debates. Considering the possible benefits and pitfalls of stretching the concept to a generalized theory of ‘the international’ throughout history, the paper argues that a central challenge remains. This regards the development of a sufficiently historically-differentiated conception of ‘unevenness’ and ‘combination’-one capable of theorizing the radical historical disjuncture represented by the international relations of capitalist modernity while nonetheless capturing aspects of inter-societal relations common to all historical epochs and thus forming a crucial causal element in the transition to capitalism itself. Developing such a perspective, a theory of U&CD could take up John Hobson’s (and others) charges of ‘Euro-centricism’ with a more historically-sensitive interpretation of the internationally-pressurized multiple paths to capitalist modernity and their crucial ‘feed-back’ effects in restructuring processes of inter-state competition. Drawing on and further contributing to the theory, the second half of the paper sketches an alternative approach to the causes of the First World War distinctively combining ‘geopolitical’ and ‘sociological’ modes of explanations into a single framework. This highlights how the necessarily variegated character of interactive socio-historical development explains the inter-state rivalries leading to war. Contextualizing the sources of conflict within the broad developmental tendencies of the Long Nineteenth century (1789-1914) and their particular articulation during the immediate pre-war juncture, the paper aims further develop the theory of U&CD in and through the rich empirical terrain of the pre-war period thereby providing a much needed empirical contribution to recent debates.

Ben Selwyn (Sussex)
‘Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the Political Economy of Late Capitalist Development’
The study of late capitalist development is often characterised as a battle between protagonists of market-led vs state-led development. For the latter position, Alexander Gerschenkron looms large, as one of the most significant theorists of state-led development under conditions of relative backwardness. There are striking similarities between Gerschenkron’s explication of the advantages of backwardness and Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development and the privilege of backwardness. (These similarities have been commented upon often but rarely subject to closer comparison): Indeed, both men share a common problematic – the comprehension of how economically backward countries could skip stages of development in order to join the ranks of economically advanced countries. This paper compares their conception of this problematic and illustrates how in a number of areas the two are complementary. These are: Their rejection of unilinear patterns of capitalist development, their appreciation of the role of states and institutions in facilitating late development, and their understanding of development as a disruptive social process.  However, in crucial areas the two diverge. These are: Their comprehension of international economic and political relations, the role and position of labour in late development, and ultimately, the potential for late capitalist development to unleash social upheavals and further, non-capitalist transformations. Overall, I suggest how Trotsky and Gerschenkron’s approaches can complement each other, but that ultimately they represent fundamentally opposed approaches to human development.

Coffee Break, 3.30pm – 4.00pm

Session Two, 4.00pm – 6.00pm

Mick Dunford (Sussex)
‘Combined and Uneven Development: A Geographical Perspective’

John Hobson (Sheffield)
‘What’s at Stake in the Neo-Trotskyist Debate? Towards a Non-Eurocentric Historical Sociology of Uneven and Combined Development’
This piece seeks to advance what is being termed ‘third wave historical sociology of IR’ (HSIR). In particular I consider how a third-wave ‘non-Eurocentric’ HSIR could be developed by entering into the extant internecine debate that is raging within the newly emergent neo-Trotskyist school of HSIR. At one extreme lies Justin Rosenberg who argues that the concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) should be historically generalised while the majority position insists that U&CD is specific only to the modern capitalist era (e.g., Ashman, Davidson, Allinson and Anievas). Here I provide some support for the Rosenberg position, by arguing that failure to historically generalise the concept beyond modern capitalism leads into the cul-de-sac of Eurocentrism. As a counter, I spend the majority of the piece sketching the outlines of a non-Eurocentric theory of U&CD by considering the ‘rise of the West’ as a case of a late-developing civilization; and in the process sketching the basis for an adequate third-wave non-Eurocentric HSIR.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com