Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Higher Education Research

Student Debt

Student Debt

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION

Call for Papers

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

SRHE Annual Research Conference 9-11 December 2015
SRHE Newer Researchers Conference 8 December 2015
Celtic Manor, Newport in South Wales, United Kingdom

 

Converging Concepts in Global Higher Education Research: Local, national and international perspectives

The Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE) invites research contributions to this international higher education conference. A significant body of research knowledge now exists which informs understandings locally, nationally and internationally and this conference theme examines issues of convergence, divergence and context and their potential impact across issues of policy and practice.

The annual SRHE Conference provides a stimulating international forum for papers of an empirical or scholarly nature relating to research into higher education in the widest sense and from a breadth of different disciplinary perspectives. The conference is highly participative, promoting the dissemination and exchange of ideas in a variety of formats, across a range of research domains.

 

You are invited to contribute to this debate in the following ways:

  • presenting a paper (including work of a conceptual or theoretical nature)
  • forming or participating in a symposium or research directions seminar
  • organising a ‘round table’ discussion
  • submitting a poster on any aspect of your research interests

 

Deadline for paper submissions: Friday 26th June 2015

 

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference 8 December 2015

The Call for papers for this one day conference for Newer Researchers will be launched shortly is on the same theme and will take place at the Celtic Manor one day in advance of the SRHE Annual Research Conference. This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in seminars and discussions. Closing date for call for papers is Friday 10 July 2015.

Website: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2015/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Advertisements
Education Crisis

Education Crisis

EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPLORING EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR TURBULENT TIMES

Society for Research into Higher Education

University of Porto, Portugal

Date – Monday, 01 September 2014: 13.30 – 18.30

Venue – University of Porto, Portugal

Network – Joint ECER/SRHE

This pre-Seminar to the ECER 2014 Conference (http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014), is co-organised by EERA Network 22: Research in Higher Education and the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), in cooperation with Centre for Research and Intervention in Education (CIIE) from FPCE – University of Porto

Venue: Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto
Rua Alfredo Allen 4200-135, Porto, Portugal

Over the past years, in many European countries, higher education has been in turmoil as, for example, budget cuts have impacted significantly on the lives of  academics and students in higher education institutions. Higher education institutions are still expected to be one of the driving forces of nation states by creating new knowledge and educating a future workforce.

The aim of this seminar is to:

  • Bring together colleagues from various European countries to discuss how higher education can cope with turbulent times and how to move forward.
  • Bring insights into and examples from various European countries on current developments in higher education.
  • Provide a meeting point for emerging researchers to discuss current issues and network with established researchers in the field of higher education.

In order to promote lively discussions and a possibility to network and share opinions the second half of the seminar will be interactive workshops. There will be four parallel sessions each of which has moderators to promote lively discussions. The results of these interactive sessions will be reported on and disseminated.

 

Chair: Jani Ursin, Link-Convenor of EERA Network22: Research in Higher Education

11.30–12.30            Registration and networking

12.30–13.30            Lunch

13.30–14.00            Welcome
Helena Costa Araujo, Director of CIIE
Helen Perkins,  Director of Society for Research into Higher Education

14.00–15.00            Keynote:
‘What is the nature of the relationship between changes in European higher education and social science research on higher education and how can it be strengthened?’
Professor Rosemary Deem (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)

15.00–15.30           Instructions for parallel sessions

15.30–17.00           Parallel sessions:

Session 1:

Future prospects in HE for Early Career researchers
Presenters/Facilitators: Mr Patrick Baughan, Department of Learning and Development, City University London, UK
University-Professor Dr Liudvika Leisyte, TU University Dortmund, Germany
(see: http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014/emerging-researchers-conference/network-workshops/nw-22/#c215201)

Session 2:

Sustaining high quality teaching and learning in higher education
Presenters/Facilitators:   Dr Paul Ashwin, Lancaster University
Dr Mari Karm, University of Tartu, Estonia
In this workshop we will explore the challenges of using the available research evidence to sustain high quality teaching and learning in higher education. We will focus on two key and related issues in supporting high quality teaching and learning: the engagement of students in their learning and how we can use knowledge of this engagement to inform the professional development of academic staff. Through short presentations, as well as small group and plenary discussions, we will explore the following questions:
• What tensions are there in the research evidence in these two areas?
• What implications do these tensions have when we attempt to use this evidence to inform teaching and learning practices in higher education?
• How can we make use of our institutional experiences to further develop the research evidence?
• How can we make the research evidence useable in our institutional  contexts?
Session 3:

Developing as a researcher in turbulent times: becoming and being an ‘extended’ professional’
A presentation by Professor Linda Evans University of Leeds
Facilitator: Dr Christine Teelken, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands

‘In this lecture Professor Evans will draw upon her own work on researcher development, to analyse what it takes to be an ‘extended’ researcher in the precarious and changing 21st century European Research Area (ERA). Adapting Eric Hoyle’s work on ‘extended’ and ‘restricted’ models of professionality, characteristics of the ‘restricted’ and ‘extended’ European researcher will be proposed. Of particular relevance to early career academics and researchers, the lecture will address  issues related to how they may develop their research skills and raise their profiles.’

Session 4:

Higher education and employment: building the connections
Presenters/Facilitators:  Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s Learning Institute, King’s College London, UK
Auxiliary Professor Mariana Alves, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal

Employability has always been a key feature of higher education, from the earliest days of the University of Bologna, to the vocational training of clerics, doctors and lawyers and the myriad professional, vocational and higher learning of today. This workshop brings together notion of “learning for learning’s sake” and “students’, institutions’ and governments’ needs for an educated workforce”. This workshop draws on research projects exploring employability from a variety of contexts. Three main themes discussed are:

– graduates’ employability – relevance  for students options and perspectives
– graduates’ employability – relevance for educational policies (either at national and/or institutional levels)
– graduates’ employability – current trends concerning educational and professional trajectories

Employability will be considered in individual, institutional, national and regional contexts. The workshop will draw on research but will have an interactive basis, encouraging participants to reflect on how employability is conceptualised. Key issues include the impact of employability on students and graduates, particularly in relation to student fees; the role and relevance of educational policies; and future trajectories.

 

Workshop participants are asked to reflect on these issues, and to think about the following questions:

1. How do you frame ‘graduates’ employability’? What resources do you draw on for this? For example research, reports, websites…
2. How is ‘graduates’ employability’ framed in higher education research? What fields does this cover? What disciplinary approaches?
3. What research, data and information will be needed in the future to enhance, assure and research graduates’ employability?

Participants are encouraged to read Chapter 3 of the report linked below (Final Report):

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/learningteaching/kli/research/student-experience/student-expectations-perceptions-HE.aspx

17.15–18.30     Summing up the workshops and the seminar

18.30–20.30     Reception (sponsored by SRHE)

 

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Society for Research into Higher Education: http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education

Education

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

Inspiring future generations; embracing plurality and difference in higher education

SRHE Conference dates: 10-12 December 2014

Venue: Celtic Manor, Newport, Wales, UK.

Reminder: Closing date for submissions: 27th June 2014

 

The Society for Research into Higher Education extends a very warm welcome to all who wish to participate.

Researchers are invited to present their work in a variety of ways: by submitting papers for presentation, individually or as part of a symposium or round table, by submitting a poster and/or by attending as a delegate and contributing to the many different discussions and debates within this vibrant three-day event.

We encourage presentations and discussions that explore both global and local perspectives as well as trends in higher education policies and practices. We also welcome conceptual and theoretical contributions that add to current discourses- or initiate new ones.

Of particular interest this year will be contributions examining the increasingly diverse higher education landscape and how the processes of research, of knowledge production, knowledge-exchange, and knowledge sharing are changing in response to increasing plurality and difference within and across the sector.

Conference registration is now open. The early booking discount ends on Friday 26 September 2014

 

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference: 9 December 2014

This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in seminars and discussions.

Closing date for submissions: 11 July 2014

 

Further conference details are available from the link below or simply via www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education

Education

REVISITING ‘DIVERSITY’ IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Tuesday, 08 July 2014: 11.00 – 14.45

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Access and Widening Participation

Institutional commitments to enhancing and promoting diversity are ubiquitous across UK and US higher education institutions. However, the concept of diversity is often used in taken-for-granted ways, or too readily collapses back into discussions of how students can be ‘shaped’ to better embrace difference. This seminar brings together two thought-provoking papers, one from the US and one from the UK, which question and challenge the concept of ‘diversity’ in relation to the internationalisation of higher education.

 

Speakers:

 

When international classrooms become Chinese students-dominated classrooms: Revisiting celebrated diversity and the internationalisation of higher education
Phan Le Ha, PhD, Associate Professor of Education, College of Education, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA
Seeking the internationalised self: transformative learning for staff as internationalisation of the curriculum in higher education
Dr Catherine Montgomery, Associate Dean (international), Faculty of Education, University of Hull, UK

 

To register a place at the seminar: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

INVESTIGATING HIGHER EDUCATION: A CRITICAL REVIEW OF RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Call for Contributions to a new SRHE/Routledge Book Publication

See: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/downloads/RoutledgeSRHE50CallforContributions.pdf

Investigating Higher Education: A critical review of Research Contributions

The Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE) was formed as a learned society in 1965, supporting a community of researchers focusing on higher education. In 2015 the Society will be looking back on 50 years of research and looking forward to the future. This presents a great opportunity to take stock of achievements across the field of higher education research.

To mark this milestone anniversary an edited contemporary volume of new contributions is to be published for the SRHE/Routledge book series.

The Book series editors will edit this volume and are now issuing an open call for chapter contributions.

 

Approach and Time Frame

1 June 2014: Open call for contributions

14 July 2014: 500 word proposals to be submitted to editors (see emails below)

18 August 2014: Outcomes of peer review communicated to potential authors

15 December 2014: Draft chapters due

27 February 2015: Final chapters due

December 2015: Book to be launched at SRHE conference

 

Please contact the editors via email with expressions of interest or if you wish to discuss your potential contribution (jenni.case@uct.ac.za & jeroen.huisman@ugent.be).

We warmly invite contributions to this volume from all authors with an interest in the field of higher education research.

Helen Perkins
Director, SRHE

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Debt

Debt

RE-IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPLORING THE CO-OPERATIVE UNIVERSITY

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Thursday 19th June 2014: 14.00-16.30

Venue – Room 410, Graduate School of Education, 35 Berkeley Square, University of Bristol

Network – South West Higher Education Network Seminar Series

 

SPEAKERS:

We Build the Road as we Travel: Routemaps to a co-operative university, Professor Rebecca Boden, Roehampton University

Social Science Centre, Lincoln: a new type of dissident institution, Professor Mike Neary, University of Lincoln

The Co-operative University: who pays for what? Mr Dan Cook, University of Bristol
Booking: To book your free place or for further information, please contact: Richard.Budd@bristol.ac.uk

SWHE Co-ordinators:
Dr Lisa Lucas (University of Bristol) and Professor Rajani Naidoo (University of Bath)

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members

 

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Economics

Economics

WHY DO INTERNSHIPS AND PLACEMENTS MATTER?

Society for Research into Higher Education

Why do Internships and Placement Matter? Further Sharing of Current Research

Date – Friday 2 May 2014, 11:00-15:45

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London, N1 9BE

Network – Network for Employability, Enterprise and Work based Learning

 

This session is run jointly with the Association of Sandwich Education and Training (ASET)

We had so much interest in our first special interest group session on placements and internships that we are hosting another session on the topic.  Feedback from our sessions has shown that participants would like more opportunity to hear about current research and to discuss it.  We have, therefore, asked some more of our members to talk about their research.  At this session the themes will be short placements, third sector internships, internships for postgraduate students and placements in art and design.  The session will begin with a challenge from our keynote speaker, Andy Phippen, from PlymouthBusinessSchool, who will talk on Placements and Internships: Opportunities beyond the Student Experience.
Programme

11:00 Introductions

11:15 Keynote 1:  Andy Phippen, Associate Head (External Relations)
Plymouth Business School
Placements and Internships – Opportunities Beyond the Student Experience?

12:00 Showcasing of current placement research 1

Among the topics: Short placements
Third sector internships
Internships for PG students
Placements in Art and Design

12:45 Discussion:  Emerging issues for research

13:15 Lunch and networking

14:00 Showcasing of current placement research 2

15:00 Discussion panel of research contributors

15:30 Final remarks and conclusions

15:45 Close
If you are currently working on research into any kind of employability, enterprise and workbased learning and would like to share your work at later events, please contact us on h.e.higson@aston.ac.uk

Convenors:

Professor Helen E Higson OBE, Professor of Higher Education Learning and Management, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Aston University

Dr Richard Blackwell, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Southampton Solent University

 

To reserve a place at this seminar: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

INTERROGATING THE HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH / POLICY INTERFACE

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Wed 2nd April 2014, 13.00-16.00pm

Venue – London Metropolitan University

Network – Higher Education Policy Network

 

Higher education researchers often want their research to make a difference, and policy makers often profess a commitment to evidence-based policy-making, but how easy is it to communicate across these different communities? This seminar will provide an opportunity to explore these issues.

 

‘Bearing bad news’ Dr. Vikki Boliver (DurhamUniversity)

Reflecting on her attempts to publicise research showing that White and privately educated applicants are more likely to be offered places at Russell Group universities than equally well qualified applicants from ethnic minority backgrounds and state schools, Dr. Boliver considers ways to foster productive engagement with bad-news research findings.

‘Can researchers and policy makers speak to each other, or are they always looking the other way?’: Professor Jim Gallacher (GlasgowCaledonianUniversity)

Professor Gallacher draws on his experience of working both as an active researcher and co-director of the Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning (CRLL), and an adviser to the Scottish Parliament and a member of the board of the Scottish Funding Council, to consider whether the policy and research communities can have meaningful dialogues.

Lunch will be available at 1pm and the event will start at 1.40. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over tea or coffee.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Prof. Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, LondonMetropolitanUniversity, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education System

Education System

CAPITALIST MARKETS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Capitalist Markets in Higher Education: Utopias or Possibilities

Date – Wednesday, 16 April 2014: 14.00-16.00

Venue – University of Bath, Bath, UK

Network – South West Regional Network

 

Speaker: Professor Simon Marginson, Institute of Education

For more than two decades, governments around the world, led by the English-speaking polities, have moved higher education systems closer to the forms of textbook economic markets. Reforms include corporatisation, competitive funding, student charges, output formats and performance reporting. But, no country has established a bona fide economic market in the first-degree education of domestic students. No research university is driven by shareholders, profit, market share, allocative efficiency or the commodity form. There is commercial tuition only in parts of vocational training and international education. At the most, there are regulated quasi-markets, as in post-Browne UK. This differs from the experience of privatisation and commercialisation of transport, communications broadcasting and health insurance in many nations. The article argues that bona fide market reform in higher education is constrained by intrinsic limits specific to the sector (public goods, status competition), and political factors associated with those limits. This suggests that market reform is utopian, and the abstract ideal is sustained for exogenous policy reasons (e.g. fiscal reduction, state control, ordering of contents). But, if capitalist markets are clearly unachievable, a more authentic modernisation agenda is needed.

BIOGRAPHY

Simon worked as a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne in Australia prior to starting at the Institute of Education in October 2013. His research and scholarship draw broadly on the social sciences and political philosophy, and are focused primarily on higher education policy, systems and institutions. Most of his projects are in comparative and international higher education. In the last decade he has conducted extended inquiries into higher education and globalization, and higher education and research in East Asia. His current research includes a comparative project on the role of higher education in constructing public good, which examines the intersection between on one hand state traditions and political cultures, on the other hand educational practices. In 2014 Simon will deliver the biannual Clark Kerr lectures on higher education in the University of California system. He is Joint Editor-in-Chief of the journal Higher Education.

Too book a place please email Rajani Naidoo at R.Naidoo@bath.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

China

China

HOME AND AWAY: CHINESE STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES ON HIGHER EDUCATION IN CHINA AND THE UK

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Tuesday 4th March 2014: 11.30 – 15.30

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Network – International Research and Researchers Network Seminar

One way or another, China is taking the international HE sector by storm; its ambition is to lead the world’s knowledge economy within the next 4 decades. Chinese students are migrating to overseas universities in their thousands and constitute a significant proportion of the UK’s HE student body. Focusing on the experiences and perceptions of Chinese students both in their native country and in the UK, this seminar uncovers contentious issues relating to the nature and quality of HE that these students experience.

 

Trends in participation and attainment of Chinese students in UK higher education
Professor Cristina Iannelli, University of Edinburgh

Chinese students represent the largest constituency of the non-EU student population studying in UK higher education institutions: a constituency that has increased in the last decade from about 4,000 (in 1998-9) to almost 84,000 in 2012-3. This paper reports the findings of research which analysed patterns of participation and attainment of Chinese students over time and discusses explanations for these patterns, and implications for HE policy and practice.

 

Social justice and higher education in China
Drs Bin Wu and Bernadette Robinson, University of Nottingham

The increasing income gaps and social inequality which have emerged from China’s rapid development raise issues of social justice for its HE sector, as universities face challenges in ensuring equal opportunity and equitable distribution of financial support to students from all social groups. This paper examines findings from a questionnaire survey that gathered the views and perspectives on social justice-related issues of 1,547 students at six universities in the western province of Shaanxi in 2011. It addresses questions such as: do rural and urban students have equal access to university? How far does poverty affect student access to and experience of higher education? Do students regard government financial support as adequate and fairly distributed? The implications for social justice and the policies needed to achieve it are considered in the light of these findings.

 

Organisational culture and teaching innovation in higher education in China
Professor Chang Zhu, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium
This paper presents findings from research carried out in six Chinese universities on teachers’ and students’ perceptions of organisational culture, and their views about and reactions to teaching innovations such as student-centred learning, collaborative learning and the use of innovative educational technologies. Involving 1,051 students and teachers, the study reveals a great need for innovation in Chinese higher education.

 

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Laddism

Laddism

LADDISM AND HIGHER EDUCATION

A Society for Research into Higher Education event

Date – 7 February 2014 ; 10.30 – 16.30

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience Network (SEN)

A one-day SEN symposium discussing masculine behaviours and student culture.

The Student Experience Network of the SRHE is holding a one day symposium on laddism and Higher Education. Its focus is on the intersection of such masculine behaviours with student culture, minorities, lived experience, and the night-time economy, all areas which also inform and shape pedagogical identities. The day has been organised following the NUS’ 2013 report on lad culture in higher education, That’s What She Said and is thus orientated towards asking how the HE sector should respond to research findings and what further research is necessary.

Emerging Themes from That’s What She Said with a discussion on further research and actions
Isabel Young (co-author of report), seconded by Kelly Temple (NUS)

This presentation reports on a research project, funded by the National Union of Students, which sought to explore women students’ experiences of ‘lad culture’ in educational, social and personal spheres. The project consisted of two parts: (1) a thematic literature review covering areas such as gender and education, cultural studies and policy sociology; and (2) in-depth qualitative research using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with a sample of 40 women students, focusing on their experiences of teaching and learning, extra-curricular activities, social life, and sex and relationships. The findings of this research show that although ‘laddism’ is only one of a variety of potential masculinities, there exists at least a significant minority of women students who find ‘lad cultures’ problematic, citing issues such as misogynist ‘banter’, objectification of women and sexual pressure and harassment. This presentation explores some of the key themes to have emerged from the report, including the evolution of ‘laddism’ and its existence as a behavior; the connection between night economies and the propagation of ‘lad culture’; intersections between gender, race, (dis)ability, sexuality and ‘lad culture’, and more. It will conclude by looking ahead to further research possibilities and actions around the impact of ‘lad culture’ in higher education and more broadly.

Isabel Young has a BA in Sociology and an MA in Gender Studies from the University of Sussex. Her research has explored BAME women’s experiences of anti-Muslim racism, constructions of sexual violence on Facebook ‘banter’ sites, and most recently, the impact of ‘lad culture’ on women students in higher education. She has worked with Survivor’s Network, Woman’s Hour and UK Uncut on the issues of VAWG and the cuts. Isabel currently runs a community programme for migrant mothers as part of the Arbour’s Migrant Women’s Mentoring and Social Inclusion project based in East London.
isabelkayoung@gmail.com

Kelley Temple is the NUS National Women’s Officer. She blogs at: http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/blogs/blog/kelleytemple/
kelley.temple@nus.org.uk

Degrees of Laddishness: Laddism in Higher Education
Professor Carolyn Jackson and Dr. Stephen Dempster
This paper provides insights into how laddism is understood, perpetuated, legitimated and challenged among undergraduates in two British universities. We explore the perceived benefits of subscribing to laddish masculinities, and also the costs of laddishness for male and female students in both student social life and teaching/learning environments. We discuss the ways that laddishness can be problematic for men as well as women, but argue that viewing laddishness as existing in a continuum of potential masculine subject positionings not only enables a more sophisticated understanding of laddishness, but also may suggest strategies through which more extreme laddism might be challenged.
Carolyn Jackson is a Professor in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University, and Co-Director of the Centre for Social Justice and Wellbeing in Education. She has published widely on gender issues in education. Her books include Lads and Ladettes in School: Gender and a Fear of Failure (2006), and Girls and Education 3-16: Continuing Concerns, New Agendas (2010, co-edited with Carrie Paechter and Emma Renold). She is currently engaged in two projects exploring laddism in higher education.
c.jackson2@lancaster.ac.uk
Dr. Steven Dempster is a Research and Teaching Associate in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University and the Dean of one of Lancaster’s undergraduate colleges.  Steve has published a number of papers on laddism in higher education and is currently working on a further project on laddism in HE, an evaluation of enhancement of teaching and learning in Scottish HEIs, and a study of the impact of the Harry Potter franchise on boys’ literacies.
s.dempster@lancaster.ac.uk

Chanting Students
Dr. Matthew Cheeseman

I began researching and collecting examples of student chanting in 2005 and have found them a stimulating way of thinking about students and their experience of higher education. Far from simple, chants are both verbal forms and performances, full of contradictory meanings and creadings. In this paper I look at how they are received by others and how they operate as expressions of student identity and enactments of ‘lad culture’. Using data collected following an ethnographic methodology, I attempt to situate chanting within larger and no less contradictory performances (such as being a student) and explain its relationship to a language that has become a totemic within the United Kingdom: banter.

Dr. Matthew Cheeseman is a Research and Teaching Associate at the University of Sheffield. He works between English Literature, Folklore, Creative Writing, Music and Education. Alongside Dr. Camille Kandiko, he convenes the Student Experience Network for the SRHE, arranging approximately three symposiums a year. He blogs at http://www.einekleine.com.

Round table on Students’ Union responses, programmes and strategies alongside thoughts on further research.
Abigail Burman, Sophie van der Ham and Kelly Temple

Abigail Burman is an American undergraduate at the University of Oxford. During her time at university she’s served as her college’s Equal Opportunities Officer, focusing on issues of violence and harassment and helped form the first University-wide campaign against sexual violence.

Sophie van der Ham completed a BA in English literature and linguistics at the University of Amsterdam & Edinburgh. She came to the University of Sussex to study an MA in Gender Studies and co-chaired the Women’s Group on campus. She was elected welfare officer at the University of Sussex Students’ Union and is carrying on the zero tolerance to sexual harassment and discrimination campaign that was started by the previous welfare officer. The campaign has been mentioned by The Guardian and aims to work constructively with the University in introducing a sexual violence policy.

The day will conclude with a general discussion, with the option to splinter into smaller groups in order to discuss research strands.

Laddism

Laddism

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education

Education

TEACHING INCLUSIVELY: CHANGING PEDAGOGICAL SPACES

Date – 9 July 2013: 12.30-16.00 (lunch included)

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Speakers:

Professor Penny Jane Burke, University of Sussex
Professor Gill Crozier, University of Roehampton

Developing inclusive teaching and learning practices in higher education is a key component of widening participation (WP) strategy. Pedagogies in higher education have the potential to contribute to creating inclusive spaces where all students can develop a sense of belonging and fitting in. This is strongly emphasised in the recent HEFCE/OFFA interim report, and is anticipated to form a central dimension of the national strategy for widening participation.

This timely seminar will launch Teaching Inclusively: Changing Pedagogical Spaces, a new continuing professional development resource pack that draws on the key findings of the Higher Education Academy funded project: ‘Formations of Gender and Higher Education Pedagogies (GaP)’. It is designed for lecturers, academic developers, WP directors and managers and policy makers to critically reflect on the complex processes in which inequalities might unwittingly be reproduced through HE pedagogies.  It offers a range of ‘think pieces’ as conceptual tools to help address complex issues of difference, diversity and inequalities and to consider the ways that teaching and learning practices are intimately connected with identity formations and the subtle processes of exclusion and misrecognition within different pedagogical spaces.

The seminar will provide an overview of the key findings of GaP to illuminate the important relationship between widening participation and HE pedagogies. It will introduce Teaching Inclusively and the ways it has been specifically designed to support HE lecturers in contributing to WP through developing inclusive teaching practices.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski