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HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY SEMINAR

SRHE Higher Educational Policy Network

Higher Education Funding Policy: A historical and contemporary analysis

Tuesday 17th May, 4-6.30pm at London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 6RP (Room No BEL1-09 in the main Tower Building)

This seminar focuses on the very topical issue of higher education funding policy, offering an opportunity to bring a historical perspective to current policy developments and to consider the potential impacts both locally and globally. The speakers are:

Professor Claire Callender, Birkbeck College and Institute of Education, University of London.

A critical assessment of the Government’s reforms of student funding – all change or no change?

This paper will examine how student financial support has changed over time and critically analyse the Government’s planned reforms, locating them within a historical policy perspective.

Dr Vincent Carpentier, Institute of Education, University of London

Public-private substitution of funding and provision in higher education: national and global implications

This paper will explore the historical connections and tensions between funding, equity and quality policies in HE with a particular focus on the origins and implications of public-private funding in the global context.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. At 6pm, there will be an opportunity to continue informal discussions of the issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor: Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

*****

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

Delegate fees for non members: £25 (students £20).                                                                                                                                  

To register for this event please contact nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Details of further meetings can be found on our website www.srhe.ac.uk

Many thanks

Nicola Manches, Administration Assistant, SRHE, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, 020 7447 2525

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Higher Education Crisis

UNMAKING THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Chris Newfield author of the “Unmaking of the Public University” is speaking at Goldsmiths College, University of London, next Monday

Monday 7th March, 2011
5.00pm-7.00pm
Room 309, Richard Hoggart Builidng
Christopher Newfield “The Broken American Funding Model: Our Higher Education Problem, and Yours”

The talk will discuss the conventional wisdom about how American research universities are funded, and show that it is wrong. Although Americans disagree about whether the privatization of public universities is educationally and socially desirable, there is a general consensus that it is financially sound. This talk shows that privatization doesn’t make basic budgetary sense, and that one can argue against reduction of public funding on financial as well as educational and social grounds. It will also review recent U.S. activism and suggest ways in which a better higher education model might be starting to emerge.

Introduced and chaired by Les Back

Christopher Newfield teaches American Studies in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current research focuses on higher education history, funding, and policy, culture and innovation, and the relation between culture and economics. Recent articles have appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Academe, Le Monde Diplomatique, La Revue Internationale des Livres et des Idées, Radikal (Turkey), Social Text, Critical Inquiry, and South Atlantic Quarterly, and include “The Renewal of Student Movements, 2009-10,” “The View from 2020: How Universities Came Back,” “The End of the American Funding Model: What Comes Next? “Ending the Budget Wars: Funding the Humanities during a Crisis in Higher Education,” “Public Universities at Risk: 7 Damaging Myths,” “Science and Social Welfare,” “L’Université et la revanche des ‘Elites’ aux Etats-Unis,” “Why Public is Losing to Private in American Research,” and “Can American Studies Do Economics?” He is the author of The Emerson Effect: Individualism and Submission in America (University of Chicago Press, 1996), Ivy and Industry: Business and the Making of the American University, 1880-1980 (Duke University Press, 2003), and Unmaking the Public University: The Forty Year Assault on the Middle Class (Harvard University Press, 2008), chairs the Innovation Group at the NSF Center for Nanotechnology in Society, runs a blog on the current crisis in higher education, Rethinking the University (http://utotherescue.blogspot.com), blogs at the Huffington Post, and is working on a book called Lower Education: What to do about our Downsized Future.

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Capitalist Crisis

THE UNIVERSITY OF FINANCE

Business and management theorists have so far responded to the financial crisis by centring on the notion of finance as an object of study. The inference here has been that the responsibility for the crisis lies with the flaws of individual managers, and, consequentially, that a sprinkling of Business Ethics (Wayne, 2009) and/or Critique (Currie et al, 2010) to the MBA curriculum is a suitable panacea for the recent excesses. From this we get the characterisation of the crisis as a product of individual misbehaviours in the financial sector: a regression onto the already decisively discredited “bad apple” thesis (e.g. Bakan, 2005). A different but related set of responses has sought to de-emphasize this traditional role of the business school as handmaiden to capitalism and thereby widen the curriculum to include politics, philosophy and cultural studies (e.g. HBR, 2009; Schmidt, 2008).

The questions raised in this special issue attempt to push the debate within the university in general, and the business school in particular, on from this concern with finance as an object of study and on towards a concern with finance as a condition of study. This focus upon the notion of finance as condition of study considers the various ways in which students and teachers alike have long been induced to view study through a purely financial logic: as surplus value without underlying production, as “knowledge transfer” without work. Within this special issue, our contributors therefore consider not so much how the curriculum might be changed in light of the crisis. Instead, they consider how the very study of finance as a condition of study might itself form the basis for a collective resistance to the ongoing financial conditioning of study.

http://www.ephemeraweb.org

Ephemera

Volume 9, Number 4 (November 2009)

Editorial

Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne and Casper Hoedemaekers: The University of Finance

Articles:

Morgan Adamson: The Human Capital Strategy

Dick Forslund and Thomas Bay: The Eve of Critical Finance Studies

Ishani Chandrasekara: Why is Finance Critical? A dialogue with a women’s community in Sri Lanka

Talk:
Stefano Harney: Extreme Neo-liberalism: An introduction

Roundtable:

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Sydney Forum on the financial crisis: an introduction

John Roberts: Faith in the numbers

Randy Martin: Whose crisis is that? Thinking finance otherwise

Martijn Konings: The ups and downs of a liberal conciousness, or, why Paul Krugman should learn to tarry with the negative

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Homemade Financial Crisis

Melinda Cooper and Angela Mitropoulos: The Household Frontier

Fiona Allon: The Futility of Extrapolation: Reflections on crisis, continuity and culture in the ‘Great Recession’

Reviews:

Elizabeth Johnson and Eli Meyerhoff: Toward a global autonomous university

Francesca Bria: A crisis of finance

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High Finance

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