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Tag Archives: Green Jobs

Harvesting

ONE MILLION CLIMATE JOBS

Public Meeting

Launch of updated “1 Million Climate Jobs” pamphlet.

Speakers: John McDonnell MP, Caroline Lucas MP, Chris Baugh (Assistant Gen. Sec PCS) and Jonathan Neale (lead author of the pamphlet).

Over the last year, the “1 Million Climate Jobs” pamphlet has sold thousands of copies in the Trade Union and environmental movement. It received the endorsement of this year’s TUC Congress.

A new, updated and expanded version, responding in more detail to the Con-Dem cuts agenda, is to be launched on Thursday 14th October, 6pm-8pm in Committee Room 10 of the House of Commons.

Organised by Campaign against Climate Change Trade Union group

http://www.climate-change-jobs.org/

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 15th AUGUST 2010

EVENTS

PUBLIC MEETING – ECONOMIC CRISIS? WHO PAYS!?

A public forum on the government’s proposed public sector wage freeze.

At risk is free collective bargaining, workers’ rights, public services and our communities, so join members of the Toronto Workers’ Assembly for a discussion on what’s happening and how we can and should respond.

Tuesday Aug. 24

7-9pm

Ryerson Student Centre – Oakham Lounge (2nd floor)

55 Gould St. (closest subway stop is Dundas, building is on the corner of Gould and Church Sts.)

More details and flyer forth coming.

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BETWEEN THE LINES PUBLISHERS FALL 2010 LINE UP

– Random Acts of Culture explores vernacular culture and dissects our current passive, apathetic, and spectatorship-based culture in favour of a more active participatory culture.

– A new collection of essays addresses poverty in Canadian communities in Persistent Poverty.

– Ben Carniol provides an essential analysis of Canada’s social workers in Case Critical, Sixth Edition.

– And we add one new title to the No-Nonsense Guide series: Derek Wall’s comprehensive No-Nonsense Guide to Green Politics.

– We have also published two updated guides including Peter Steven’s updated edition of the No-Nonsense Guide to Global Media and Wayne Ellwood’s updated No-Nonsense Guide to Globalization.

More info: http://www.btlbooks.com/categoryinfo.php?index=37

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CALL FOR PAPERS – GLOBAL MEDIA JOURNAL-AMERICAN EDITION

Special Spring 2011 issue on New Media, Informal Learning and Social Change

 *Deadline for Submissions:* October 15, 2010

Global Media Journal invites the submission of essays and scholarly articles that builds on the relationship between new media, informal learning and social change for the Spring 2011 issue. The guest editors, Payal Arora from Erasmus University, and Matthew Kam from Carnegie Mellon University are particularly interested in articles that push the boundaries on how people in diverse transnational and cross-cultural environments learn to use new media technologies for a wide spectrum of social activity.

More info: http://lass.calumet.purdue.edu/cca/gmj/gmj_call%20for%20papers.htm

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TORONTO MAYORAL DEBATE ON DISABILITY ISSUES

– Want to hear from candidates running for Mayor what they will do to improve services for Torontonians living with disabilities?

– Do you have questions about City services and how they can be made more accessible?

– Are you interested in learning what ideas the candidates have for creating inclusive and accessible public spaces?

September 22nd, 2010

1 – 3pm

Scadding Court Community Centre Gymnasium

707 Dundas Street West, Toronto ON

 (please enter through doors on the east side of the parking lot on Bathurst St.)

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ALARA’S (ACTION LEARNING, ACTION RESEARCH ASSOCIATION) 2010 WORLD CONGRESS

6-9th September 2010

Melbourne, Australia

Engage with like-minded (and other-minded) people in conversations about historical and current philosophies underpinning participatory action research, debate issues of power, deepen your understanding of methodologies and be inspired by accounts of contemporary practices/praxis.

Be stimulated by critical dialogues and reflections within the ‘applied’ streams of: Social Ecology Community and International Development; Health and Wellbeing; Systems /Business /Organisational Development; Education and Learning; and Decolonising Practice, including cross-cultural learning with Indigenous and other peoples and contexts.

More info: http://www.alara.net.au/worldcongress/2010

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THE CATALYST CENTRE’S  SCHOOL OF ACTIVISM

Thursday Aug. 26 and Friday Aug. 27

Family Services Toronto

355 Church St., Toronto (just south of Carlton – closest subway: College at Yonge)

Facilitators: Chris Cavanagh & Deborah Konecny

Make good use of the slower pace of summer programming and lighter network schedules to build your skills for the coming year.

Take part in two days of intensive training to hone your planning and facilitation skills. You can register for either or both.

The recommended fee for each workshop is $150 or pay what you can.

To register: Please respond to this e-mail message or phone 416-516-9546 and tell us your name, e-mail, phone number and what you would like to pay.

– Thursday, August 26, 9:30-4:30: Democratic Facilitation By Design

– Friday,  August  27, 9:30-4:30: Not Just a Bag ‘o Tricks – Popular Education  Tools, Techniques and  Thoughts 

More info: http://www.catalystcentre.ca/a-school-of-activism

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NEWS & VIEWS

CURRICULUM & RESOURCES: GREEN JOBS AND GREEN BUILDINGS

Great resources for teaching from the Yes! Education Connection Newsletter.

Lesson plans, hands-on activities, and award-winning projects on green building and economies will demonstrate to your students that there’s a better, sustainable, and just future that they can help build, shape, and design.

Read more: http://bit.ly/cZoETc

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VIDEO – MEDICARE SUSTAINABILITY: FACTS & MYTHS

(Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives)

Canadians are being told that public health care financing is not sustainable, and that the solution is a shift to more private health insurance and private delivery of services. Renowned pollster Nik Nanos reviews the numbers, and Canada’s pre-eminent health economist, Dr. Robert G. Evans, presents the facts and the myths.

Watch the video: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/multimedia/medicare-sustainability-facts-myths

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BOOK:  LOW-INCOME STUDENTS AND THE PERPETUATION OF INEQUALITY

With a lingering recession sending Americans (back) to college in record numbers, and an administration determined to improve  the country’s record on degree attainment, higher education, more than ever, has plenty of public attention. But a new book argues that higher education in the United States is falling ever more short on a variety of fronts — particularly when it comes to those students who, theoretically, should stand to gain the most from it.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/07/07/berg

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BRITAIN’S AUSTERITY BUDGET: A CLASS ACT

By Hugo Radice, The Bullet

Following the inconclusive outcome of the British general election on May 6th, the ‘centrist’ Liberal Democratic Party decided to turn sharply to the right by agreeing to join the Tories in a coalition government. In the run-up to the election, the Tories had argued strongly that Britain faced the prospect of a fiscal crisis unless the government’s deficit was brought down further and faster than the outgoing Labour government intended.

The new government quickly cranked up the volume over the deficit, with fresh scare stories about the risk of contagion from the Greek sovereign debt crisis and the subsequent disarray across the Eurozone. Although Labour and the left at once warned of the danger that sharp cuts would risk a new recession, the coalition insisted on pursuing their austerity agenda – and none more so than the Lib Dem ministers, who before the election had sided firmly with Labour on the issue.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/385.php

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO REPORT – A RECOVERY-FREE ZONE: THE UNYIELDING IMPACT OF THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN ON NONPROFIT COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES IN ONTARIO

Community service organizations across Ontario report an unyielding dilemma, driven by the economic recession: how to meet increasing demand for services with falling revenues from funding sources.

A Recovery-Free Zone, a survey of 311 non-profit community service agencies across Ontario, released today by the Social Planning Network of Ontario follows up one year later on a similar survey conducted in 2009. It shows that service demand continues to rise with 68% of respondents seeing a greater demand in April 2010 than prior to September 2008. Almost 80% of respondents attribute this increase in demand as primarily or in part due to economic conditions.

Read more: http://bit.ly/98AZmT

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BUSINESS UNIONISM VS. WORKPLACE DEMOCRACY

Are unions an ally or an obstacle in the struggle to democratise work? It seems an odd question at first. There are many, many unionists who support the workplace democracy agenda. In fact the New Unionism Network is made up of them; it’s one of our 4 key principles. But take a read of this article by Wanda Pasz and have a think about her real target: business unionism. This is a model in which unions seek membership simply and solely to bargain for them over wages and conditions. Deliberately or not, these unions impose a strict limit on their members’ agenda. Studies have shown again and again that workers want more, particularly in the connected areas of voice and influence. Business unionism sets these aspirations aside. I’m sure many of us will share Ms Pasz’s view of what unions should be, even if we disagree with her assessment of what they currently are.

Read more: http://newunionism.wordpress.com/2010/04/24/business-unionism-vs-workplace-democracy/

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND SELFHOOD IN THE PRACTICE OF ADULT LEARNING

Elana Michelson

Adult Education Quarterly published 29 June 2010, 10.1177/0741713609358447

http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713609358447v1

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CLASS CONFLICT AND INDUSTRIAL LOCATION

Erik K. Olsen

Review of Radical Political Economics published 26 July 2010, 10.1177/0486613410377862

http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0486613410377862v1

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DOES THE CHANGE TO WIN FEDERATION REPRESENT U.S. LABOR’S THIRD MOMENT? EVIDENCE FROM NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD CERTIFICATION ELECTIONS, 2003–2005

Victor G. Devinatz

Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal Volume 22, Number 3, 161-173

http://www.springerlink.com/content/d107843q8n172237/

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BACK TO THE GARDEN: COMMUNES, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND ANTIURBAN PASTORALISM AT THE END OF THE SIXTIES

Steven Conn

Journal of Urban History published 2 August 2010, 10.1177/0096144210374449

http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0096144210374449v1

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JOB POSTINGS

EDITORIAL INTERN, CORPORATE KNIGHTS MAGAZINE

The Corporate Knights Internship Program lasts four months with our next cycle commencing September 2010.

The internship will consist of a minimum of 20 hours per week with flexible scheduling available. A small stipend will be based on the intern’s ability and availability.

Candidates with backgrounds in politics, business, engineering, statistics, environment, geography, development, and English are a good fit for Corporate Knights. A passion for sustainability is a must. Successful candidates will be self-motivated, flexible, and deadline- and detail-oriented. The internship requires a strong knowledge of Microsoft Excel. Mathematical and statistical understanding is an asset.

More details: http://corporateknights.ca/about-us/61-about-us/286-internship.html

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LEED PROJECT MANAGER, PROVIDENT ENERGY MANAGEMENT INC

Location: Toronto, Ontario

Provident Energy Management is a leading provider of sustainable solutions to the commercial and high-rise residential building industry.

Due to continued growth we are seeking a LEED Project Manager to join the sustainable building consulting team in our Toronto office.

Key Responsibilities:

– Review design and construction drawings to verify and document environmental performance

– Coordinate and track LEED submittal documentation provided by the project team and review for completeness and accuracy

– Perform calculations relating to energy and resource use to ensure sustainability targets are met

– Prepare LEED specifications for tender and construction purposes

– Attend site meetings throughout the construction phase and perform site reviews

– Assist in the research of new LEED-compliant construction products and technologies

More info: http://www.pemi.com/pdf/LEED_PM_10Jul12.pdf

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK):

Head: Peter Sawchuk

Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca.

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Socialist Project

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12TH DECEMBER 2009

NEWS & VIEWS

CSEW LAUNCHES ANTI-POVERTY NEWSLETTER

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work has just launched a newsletter, “Learning Changes”, which will highlight the work of its Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning Project.

To read more, click here: http://www.csew.ca/APCOLnewsletter2009v1n1.pdf

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25 IN 5 NETWORK FOR POVERTY REDUCTION – BULLETIN

Dec 11, 2009: Stand Up Against the Backlash from the Auditor General’s Report

In this week’s eBulletin:

-Quote of the Week
-Ontario Auditor General’s Report Underlines Need for Social Assistance Reform
-Backgrounder: Just the Facts
-What Can You Do? TAKE ACTION

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/5NmQu2

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VIDEO: ROOTS OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

A Presentation of the Critical Social Research Collaborative

Ottawa, October 29, 2009 – Facilitator: Carlo Fanelli

This workshop explores alternative interpretations of the current economic crisis. The presentations are from organized labour, community activists and academics. The focus of this workshop is critical engagement, discussion and debate. Questions addressed include: How have various perspectives analyzed and understood the roots of the current economic crisis? Is there something fundamentally unsound about the current political-economic structure? Is the current crisis to be located within a set of recently established policies, or better understood over the long-term historical development of capitalism? How have the policy prescriptions and ideological rationales shifted over the years? And, more ambitiously, where do we go from here?

View: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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WE AREN’T BUILDING AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Posted December 9, 2009

>From No Excuse: The Poverty Project Blog:

The Ontario Auditor General’s latest report has received a lot of media attention. With the report nearly three hundred pages long, it is not surprising that the media has to pick and choose what it will focus on. In this case, they seem to have come down on that old chestnut, welfare fraud. More on that to follow. But first I’ll say that they missed this bigger story — affordable housing programs don’t really build affordable housing.

For more details visit: http://bit.ly/6w7YQp

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THE NEW SOCIALIST REGISTER WEBSITE IS NOW FULLY UP AND RUNNING!

Featuring SR 2010 on Morbid Symptoms: Health Under Capitalism, alongside our amazing archive of all 700+ essays we’ve published since 1964!

We’re sure you will want to check it out at http://socialistregister.com

This is first year the Register is being published simultaneously online and in print and it is the first time that all the essays ever published in the Register are available in one electronic archive. We are sure you agree this is a big deal, and given how much the world needs the Socialist Register that you will want to do all you can to make it successful. We would very much hope that you will personally subscribe now (from the home page go to the Subscriptions tab and click on the Merlin order link at the bottom – at £25 it’s value for money, to use that term).

We would also appreciate your help to make effective a major subscriptions campaign we are undertaking. At the very least, if you are working at an institution with a library, could you immediately contact the appropriate people at your library and ask them to take out an institutional subscription to the Register? Many of these librarians will be getting a version of the attached flyer, but we know that librarians are only likely to act on this when requests are made from users.

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VIDEO: OCAP METRO HALL OCCUPATION

Toronto, December 8, 2009

More Than 150 Angry Social Assistance Recipients Storm and Occupy Municipal Welfare Offices

Members of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP) and more than 150 people struggling to survive on Ontario Works and ODSP occupied the 12th floor of Toronto’s Metro Hall. The group refused to leave until they receive the Special Diet Benefit that they are entitled to. The City is responsible for administering social assistance in Toronto, and people are currently being denied their right to the Special Diet Benefit. More people than ever are being forced to live on welfare in Ontario. They face two major problems. First of all, the income they receive does not let them pay their rent and feed their families properly. Secondly, welfare offices do all they can to deny even the small benefits people are supposed to get. When they apply for Special Diet, Community Start Up and other benefits, they are denied their rights. This must stop.

View: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES (CCPA) UNVEILS NEW WEBSITE

Dear Friends and Members,

We’re excited to announce the launch of the CCPA’s new website. Built on an entirely new platform with open-source software, the site is loaded with new features to make the Centre’s research easier to access and follow.

– find what you’re looking for with an advanced search engine;
– watch and listen to videos, slideshows and podcasts in our new multimedia section;
– share our content to social networking sites or email pages to your contacts;
– purchase CCPA books, gift memberships, and join or donate to the Centre with an improved shopping cart system.

Click here for a full tour of the site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/welcome-new-site

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: RESEARCH ON HEALTHCARE FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED AND UNINSURED

Individuals/organizations are invited to submit abstracts for oral presentations or poster presentations by Friday December 18, 2009 for a conference aiming to gather local academic and community researchers with interest in health services for uninsured and undocumented clients.

For more info, click here: http://bit.ly/667OnB

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HOUSING AGAIN BULLETIN

Sponsored by Raising the Roof as a partner in Housing Again.

A monthly electronic bulletin highlighting what people are doing to put housing back on the public agenda across Canada and around the world, sponsored by Raising the Roof as part of the Housing Again partnership.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/6rbsyg

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THE NEW UNIONISM NETWORK – ORGANIZING FOR WORKPLACE DEMOCRACY

New Unionism is about unions setting agendas, rather than just reacting to them. This network unites supporters of four key principles: organizing, workplace democracy, internationalism and creativity.

To read our latest blog entries, click here: http://newunionism.wordpress.com/

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OPPORTUNITIES FOR GREEN JOBS IN CANADA HIGHLIGHTED IN GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH REPORT

The world is facing climate and economic crises, people are experiencing serious impacts and without urgent action the world is in peril. Mere weeks away from the important climate negotiations in Copenhagen, Denmark, world leaders are already warning that urgent action may not come soon. This must change.

The Council of Canadians and the Canadian Labour Congress have produced Green Decent and Public, a report focused on opportunities for the public sector to play a prominent role in generating good jobs. Green Decent and Public focuses on opportunities for improving energy efficiency and rapidly expanding electricity production from renewable resources. Public and community ownership of renewable power is offered as an alternative that has distinct advantages to further market liberalization in the electricity sector. These advantages include retaining economic revenues, maximizing social benefits, prioritizing conservation and ensuring energy security.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4FIs8A

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RADICALS AT WORK NETWORK

Radicals at Work is a network of young activists and radicals involved in workers’ movements. We have come together to connect our radical ideas to our jobs and to work together to build a stronger labor movement.

We come from many jobs and communities – we are young rank and file workers, office workers, union and non-profit staff, activists working with workers centers, students, and teachers. We have a shared commitment to grassroots democracy and a workers movement that takes on racism, sexism, homophobia and isn’t afraid to go head-to-head with the boss.

Our website is meant to inform, spark discussion and be a place for conversations and education on some of the issues facing workers’ movements today.

To read more, click here: http://radicalsatwork.org/

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CALEDON INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL POLICY – DEVELOPING A DEPRIVATION INDEX: THE RESEARCH PROCESS

by Richard Matern, Michael Mendelson and Michael Oliphant, December 2009

This paper tells the story of the development of the Ontario Deprivation Index by the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

To read more, click here: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/836ENG.pdf

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MURRAY DOBBIN’S BLOG – POVERTY: THE ULTIMATE LITMUS TEST OF DEMOCRACY

If we were to judge democracy using the language of business we would ask how it does on the “deliverables.” In other words, does it deliver on its promises of equality? In a capitalist society it is virtually impossible to deliver anything like complete equality but the role of government in the period following the Second World War was to provide a measure of equality in a system whose foundation was inequality. It has always struck me that the term we use to describe our political economic system – liberal democracy – is an oxymoron. Or more accurately a system that tries to integrate two mortally hostile notions: property rights and democracy. These are two principles that cannot be reconciled – eternal conflict is literally guaranteed.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4mRZCs

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BOOK REVIEW – UNPREDICTABLE FUTURES: STORIES FROM WORKER-RUN FACTORIES IN ARGENTINA

Written by Benjamin Dangl  

Reviewed: Sin Patron: Stories From Argentina’s Worker-Run Factories, edited by Lavaca, 320 pages, Haymarket Books, 2007.

Following the social upheaval in Argentina in 2001-2002 a book was published in Spanish that a lot of activists and independent journalists in the country began trying to get their hands on. It wasn’t in all of the bookstores, but news about it traveled like wildfire. Now the legendary book, Sin Patron: Stories From Argentina’s Worker-Run Factories, is translated and available to the English-speaking world.

To read more, click here: http://towardfreedom.com/home/content/view/1770/1/

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG – BEYOND THE BUBBLE: IMAGINING A NEW CANADIAN ECONOMY

(Here is a brief summary of my new book, published earlier this month by Between The Lines Publishing, Toronto.)

Beyond the Bubble: Imagining A New Canadian Economy, makes the case that the economic crash of 2008 marked the end of one world age and the beginning of another. What has ended is the neo-liberal age of globalization and the American-centred global economy. What lends weight to this thesis is both the nature of the system of finance whose collapse is at the centre of the global crisis and the crushing problems that face the United States, making the re-assertion of an American-centred global economy exceedingly improbable.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4xbapx

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MUSEUM WORKERS AT WAR: PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND THE PUBLIC SECTOR SQUEEZE

by Priscillia Lefebvre

The casualization of labour has placed many workers in a position of precariousness forcing them into a state of perpetual insecurity characteristic of the ‘new economy’ neoliberal nightmare. In an effort to reduce production costs and maximize profitability, many employers have adopted a neoliberal approach to employment, which is achieved through the temporary and discretional use of labour, major layoffs, the retrenchment of wages, workplace intensification and the denial of benefits. The result of which has brought real wages to a near stand-still over the past twenty-years, as well as a growing chasm between worker productivity and the compensation that follows.

The battle for wage parity and job security rages on in Ottawa between the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (CMCC), which operates both the Canadian Museum of Civilization and Museum of War, and the 92% of fed up workers who voted in favour of a strike. The current strike by 420 Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) members is the longest running labour strike in PSAC history. The workers have been on strike for more than 60 days after initial attempts to bargain for a fair collective agreement came to a halt on September 18th of this year.

To read more, click here: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/278.php

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Note: the Socialist Project web site is excellent: http://www.socialistproject.ca/

TRADE UNION COMMISSION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

 A commission for four British trades unions argues the case for the immediate creation of a million new jobs all of which reduce green house gases – and urge the British government to create a national climate service:

http://www.pcs.org.uk/en/resources/green_workplaces/green_campaigns/one-million-climate-jobs-now.cfm

Introduction

Several trade unions and many climate activists in Britain have decided to fight to make the government create one million green climate jobs immediately. This short report from the Campaign against Climate Change explains how we can do that and why we must.

At some point gradual climate change is going to turn into runaway catastrophe. We may well hit that point in the next twenty years. To avoid doing so, we need drastic cuts in the amount of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases we put into the air.

This will mean government regulation and international agreements. It will also take a lot of work – jobs. We have to produce wind, wave, tide and solar power. We have to renovate and insulate our homes and buildings. And we have to provide a network of cheap buses and trains.

There are two and a half million unemployed people in Britain. By next year there are likely to be three million or more. It is possible that the economy will have started to ‘recover’ by 2010. But recovery only means that profits and sales begin to rise. Unemployment will grow for a time after ‘recovery’ begins, and may stay high for a very long time.

We have people who need jobs and work that must be done. A million climate jobs in the UK will not solve all the economy’s problems. But it will take a million human beings off the dole and put them to work saving the future.

We cannot halt climate change by action only in the UK. But if we act, people all over the world will know, and take hope and courage to act themselves.

Who are we?

In the spring of 2009 the trade union group of the Campaign against Climate Change organised a conference of 200 union activists. That conference decided to start a serious fight for green climate jobs. We set up a working commission to draw up detailed plans. That commission has people from the campaign, from several UK unions, from non-governmental organisations and many academic experts. It is preparing a longer report with more detailed calculations of how many jobs will be needed in each sector and how much they will cut emissions.

But we are bringing out this booklet now, because we want unions to start fighting for a million jobs right away.

The main kinds of new jobs we need:

* Producing alternative energy,

* Insulating and renovating buildings and making better appliances

* Public transport on trains and buses

* Manufacturing

* Educating and training the new workers. 

Section 1 – What are climate jobs?
Climate jobs are jobs that reduce the amount of greenhouse gases we put into the air. Greenhouse gases cause global warming. This preliminary report will concentrate on the most important gas, carbon dioxide (CO2). We are emitting CO2 into the atmosphere by burning coal, oil and gas – these are called CO2 ’emissions’. We need to cut CO2 emissions as fast and as deeply as possible, especially in developed countries like the UK. Here we should be looking at cuts of around 75% to 80%. That means burning only 20% of the coal, oil and gas we do now. (For the reasons why, see section 3).

We can do that. But it will take a lot of work. If we can cut our energy use in half and supply half of that from alternative energy, we can cut CO2 emissions by 75%. We will need at least a million new climate jobs to do that. When we say a million climate jobs, we mean something rather different from what the politicians mean when they talk about ‘green jobs’.

We mean climate jobs, not ‘green jobs’. Climate jobs are jobs that cut down the amount of greenhouse gases we put in the air and thus slow down climate change. ‘Green jobs’ can mean anything – jobs in the water industry, national parks, landscaping, bird sanctuaries, pollution control, flood control and many more things. All these jobs are necessary. But they do not affect global warming.

We want a million new jobs, not ones people are already doing. We don’t want to add up existing and new jobs and say that we now have a million climate jobs. We don’t mean jobs with a climate connection, or a climate aspect. We don’t want old jobs with new names, or ones with ‘sustainable’ in the job title. And we don’t mean ‘carbon finance’ jobs.

We want the government to employ a million workers. That means we want the government to start employing 83,300 workers a month and to have employed one million within twelve months. This is a new idea. Up to now, government policy has been to use subsidies and tax breaks to encourage private industry to invest in renewable energy. They also plan to give people grants or loans for part of the cost of renovating their homes. Their idea is to encourage the market.

We want something more like the way the government used to run the National Health Service. In effect, the government sets up a National Climate Service and the new NCS employs staff to do the work that needs to be done. That way we can be sure it is done. Given what the scientists are telling us, we need to be sure.

Most of us in the trade union group would like to see almost all of these workers employed by central or local government. We are aware this may not be politically possible, and part of the work will probably be done by contractors. But we want the government to control the project – so that we all know they are making sure it happens – and not simply rely on the market. And we want jobs with proper wages, pensions and trade union rights. A million new climate jobs will also create hundreds of thousands of other new jobs. This always happens with new investment. New jobs are created with suppliers. For example, the new National Climate Service may run the wind turbine factory. But that factory will buy steel, wood, aluminium, electricity, brooms and tea, and the people who make and transport those things will also have jobs.

New jobs are also created because a million new workers with wages spend more money than they did on the dole. Somebody has to make the goods and services they buy. Those people have new jobs too. And so do the people who make the things they buy, and the new materials their companies buy. But some people will lose their jobs. If there is a massive expansion in renewable energy, some of the jobs in the old energy economy will go. By no means all and it won’t happen quickly, but it will happen.

In the same way, a massive shift to public transport would create jobs driving buses, making buses, and making electric cars. But there would be fewer jobs making petrol and diesel cars. Many more jobs will be created than lost. It takes many more workers to run buses and trains than it does to build cars for the same number of passengers. For a given amount of energy, it takes more workers to build and operate alternative energy than it does to build and operate gas or coal fired power stations. And jobs renovating homes and buildings do not put anyone out of work.

We will have to protect people who lose their jobs because of the new climate economy. This is easy if the government employs the new climate workers. The government simply guarantees new jobs to these workers and provides training if needed.

Communities dependent on fossil fuel industries must also be supported economically and financially to help transform the local economy and improve community well-being. Moreover, enough of the new jobs in the climate economy must go to the communities most affected. This is not only a matter of social justice. If we don’t guarantee jobs in this way, different groups of workers will be in conflict. There are powerful forces in society, like the oil companies, who do not want a new climate economy. They will use those divisions between workers to make sure nothing is done. So the new Climate Service will employ a million direct workers, but create about one and a half million jobs in all. This is a rough estimate. The government will be employing 1,000,000 workers directly. Examples from other industries suggest that these million workers will create approximately another 850,000 jobs in related industries and increased spending in local economies. On the other hand, some jobs will also be lost. We cannot yet be precise about these numbers, but something like 350,000 is probably not that far out. This gives us a net gain of 1,500,000 workers.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk