Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Graham Taylor

Global Economic Crisis

Global Economic Crisis

SOCIOLOGY AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Sociology

A journal of the British Sociological Association

Sociology and the Global Economic Crisis

 

Special Issue Call for Papers

Deadline for submissions: 31 August 2013

 

Editorial Team:

Ana C. Dinerstein (University of Bath), Gregory Schwartz (University of Bath) and Graham Taylor (University of the West of England)

 

Brief: As the Editors of the 2014 Annual Special Issue of Sociology (http://soc.sagepub.com), a journal of the British Sociological Association (http://www.britsoc.co.uk), would like to invite you to submit a paper, and extended book review essay, or a theoretical intervention that does one of two broadly defined things: 

·         Explore how sociology can contribute to a better understanding of (the lived experience of) the global economic crisis; and/or

·         Reflect on how social processes and movements confronting the crisis can inspire a new sociological imagination.

 

Our aim is to bring together contributions that:

·         Bridge disciplines

·         Unsettle conventions

·         Cosmopolitanise epistemologies

·         Renew sociology

 

We welcome contributions on relevant topics in any field of social science engaging with sociological research, from early career and established academics, and from those outside academia.

 
Rationale: The Editorial Board of Sociology considered a high number of proposals in response to the tender for the Special Issue of the journal in 2014. Our proposal, titled ‘Sociology and the Global Economic Crisis’ was selected as the successful submission. The Special Issue will address the urgent need to deconstruct and interrogate the formulation and reality of the global economic crisis. Additionally, it will systematically and critically investigate the specifically social processes underpinning its development and intensification.

Our aim in this proposal has been to tackle the challenge confronting the social sciences by the current economic crisis, in that there has largely been a failure to translate a quotidian reality of crisis into adequate forms of knowledge. While there has been discussion of ‘the crisis’, or ‘austerity’, of growing poverty, precarity, unemployment, and proletarianisation, there have been severe limitations in the disciplines of social science to engage with their object of knowledge in a way that seriously rethinks the epistemological and methodological assumptions of such knowledge. In short, the emergence of the current crisis has tended to highlight serious limits to the sociological imagination. Rethinking the ‘crisis’ could facilitate the renewal of sociology as an intellectual force in the public sphere, and imbue sociology with a critical or radical force that has been missing in recent decades.

With the explicit aims of the special issue to bridge disciplines, unsettle conventions and cosmopolitanise epistemologies, we see the contribution of critical Marxist theorists as paramount. Why? Above all, by asking authors to reflect on how social relations of production are confronted and rethought by various (new) movements and (new) forms of politics, and how modes of protest are not only confronting the political-cultural and class changes, but how social mobilisation itself nurtures epistemological innovation. 

Queries: The full paper should be submitted by the 31 August 2013. The articles will be peer reviewed following the journal’s usual procedures. The special issue is to be published in October 2014. To discuss initial ideas, seek editorial advice, or discuss a specific paper, please contact the Special Issue Editors by email on sociology.specialissue.2014@gmail.com

The Full Call for Papers can be viewed at: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/48566/Global_Economic_Crisis_SOC_SI_2014_CFP.pdf

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-sociology-and-the-global-economic-crisis

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CRISIS

CRISIS

 

 

It's CrisisTime!

It's CrisisTime!

CRISIS WHAT CRISIS: FORWARD TO THE PAST?

 

 Critical Labour Studies: 6th Symposium 2009

Venue: The School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Saturday 21st/Sunday 22nd November 2009

Statement of Intent
It is clear to researchers and activists, both in the trade union movement and universities, that global capitalism is increasingly shaping the worlds of work and employment. The imposition of this neo-liberal orthodoxy has many profound implications, not least that states seek to both de-legitimise workers’ opposition and marginalise their organisations. However, just as capitalism has embraced neo-liberal strategies, there has emerged a new politics of resistance that is varied and diverse, embracing: trade union and socialist organisations, green and ecological protest movements, anti-war activists, feminists, human rights campaigners and NGOs. It is against this background that the Critical Labour Studies (CLS) symposium has aimed to bring together researchers and activists to discuss key features of work and employment from a radical and labour-focused perspective. We recognise that while left academic researchers participate in the usual round of mainstream conferences, the scope for focused radical debate around these themes is actually quite limited. Through CLS we have developed an open working group and discussion forum that engages with many of the challenges facing researchers and trade unionists within the current environment of work and employment. By ‘labour’, we anticipate, in the traditions of radical researchers over the ages, a broad understanding of myriad social, economic and political agendas. To date, themes have included: race, identity and organising migrant workers, global unionism and organising internationally, the new politics of production, privatisation, outsourcing and offshoring. The list of themes and questions that concern us continues to develop over time, and the intention will be to reflect this evolving agenda at this year’s symposium. An ancillary objective is to engage in genuinely critical debate, rescuing this term from its co-option by mainstream agendas.

The Format of the Symposium
Building on the successes of the past five years, the forthcoming symposium will be structured as a series of plenary sessions. Each will be organised around a particular theme with speakers and discussants, followed by a broad discussion. It has been an important principle of CLS that the conference is not based on the convention of academic conferences with specific papers being presented in separate streams. Rather our intention has been to deepen discussion and debate, and to bring together researchers and labour/union movement activists (where possible) in joint sessions. All sessions are genuinely open and inclusive and involve a broad range of participants, from established academics to early-career researchers, and from established trade union officials to shop-floor representatives and grass-roots activists. The distinctive organising principles of CLS are, therefore, to assist unions and workers in dealing with the challenges faced in the neo-liberal world of work and employment. Ultimately, discussion of strategies and tactics are related to the broader aim of creating a socialist society.

*CLS PROGRAMME 2009*

VENUE: School of Oriental and African Studies
– Khalili Lecture Theater (KLT), University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

DATES: 21st and 22nd of November

Organisers: Demet Dinler, Jane Holgate and Miguel Martinez Lucio

Saturday 21st

8.30-9.30 Registration (with coffee and tea)

9.30 Welcome and introduction

First Session – Work Intensification and Lean Production

10.00 – 11.00

‘Is that Banana Active?’ Lean and Mean in the Civil Service
Speaker from PCS, Bob Carter (de Montfort University), Andy Danford (University of West of England), Debra Howcroft (University of Manchester), Helen Richardson (University of Salford), Andrew Smith (University of East of London), Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde)

11.00-11.30 tea and coffee

11.30-12.30

Challenging lean production in the car industry. The politics of developing critical research agenda in and beyond the shop floor.
Steve Craig (UCATT), Ken Murphy (UNITE and Paul Stewart (Strathclyde University)

12.30-1.00

Prospects for a Critical Labour Psychology
Thomas Ryan (Northumbria University)

1.00-2.00 Lunch

Second Session – Labour Markets, Migration and Labour

2.00-2.45

The growth of living wage campaigns across university campuses

Clare Soloman – SOAS coordinator of the campaign; Jose Stalin Bermudez – shop steward; Demet Dinler – SOAS

2.45-3.30

Adapt or Decline – A Trade Union Future for Black Workers

Jane Holgate (Working Lives Institute) and Wilf Sullivan (TUC)

3.30- 4.00 tea and coffee

4.00-4.30

Racism, Nationalism and the Labour Movement in Northern Ireland: Racist bigots; they haven’t gone away you know

Independent Workers Union (IWU) address to CLS – Tommy McKearney IWU

4.30-5.30 Towards a Critical approach to Migration and Labour

Migration research: Why theory and methodology matters
Jutta Moehrke, Stoke-on-Trent Citizens Advice Bureau
Steve French, Centre for Industrial Relations, Keele University

Migration and the Politics of Research: Comparisons and Stereotypes
Heather Connolly and Miguel Martinez Lucio (University of Manchester)

Social 7pm onwards Rugby Tavern, 9 Great James St London, WC1N 3ES

Sunday 22nd

Third Session: Politics and Unions: Class and Organising

9.30 tea and coffee

10.00-11.00

Organising and Class
Mel Simms (Warwick) and Martin Smith GMB

11.00-12.00

Towards a Typology of Alternative Trade Union Futures in Western Europe
Martin Upchurch (Middlesex University), Andy Mathers (University of the West of England), Graham Taylor (University of the West of England)

12.-12.30

Time for a different model of public sector trade unionism
Roger Kline (UCU)
12.30-1.30 – Lunch

1.30 -2.30 – Open Discussion: CLS and Future Developments
_______

Join the Critical Labour Studies Email List

If you would like to be added to the CLS email list, please go to:
https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A0=CRITICAL-LABOUR-STUDIES

Check out our website: http://criticallabourstudies.org.uk/site/

Registration and Contact for the Conference

• The sessions will be held at the Khalili Lecture Theater (KLT) and registration is at the entrance of this lecture theatre in SOAS.
• The registration fee for the weekend is £60.00 (unwaged or low waged £40). This will include food, tea/coffee and Saturday evening’s entertainment.
• For further information contact Demet Dinler dd1@soas.ac.uk, Jane Holgatej.holgate@londonmet.ac.uk, or Miguel Martinez Lucio Miguel.MartinezLucio@manchester.ac.uk.
• TO REGISTER AND SEND YOUR CHEQUE CONTACT Jane Holgatej.holgate@londonmet.ac.uk – Dr Jane Holgate, Working Lives Research Institute, London Metropolitan University, 31 Jewry Street, London EC3N 2EY – Make cheques payable to the ‘LONDON ORGANISERS NETWORK’.
• It is recommended that you register and confirm attendance in advance of the conference due to the restrictions on numbers.

This event is supported by Historical Materialism, Capital and Class, and the BUIRA Marxist Study Group

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

The Labour Debate / El Trabajo En Debate

The Labour Debate / El Trabajo En Debate

THE LABOUR DEBATE

 

 

The Labour Debate: An Investigation into the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work was originally published in 2002 by Ashgate. The book was edited by Ana Dinerstein and Michake Neary. It has now been translated into Spanish, with a new Preface by Ana Dinerstein. The bibliographic details of this new Spanish edition are:

A.C.Dinerstein y Neary Mike (2009) (Comp.) El Trabajo en debate. Una investigacion sobre la teroia y realidad del trabajo capitalista, Ediciones Herramienta, Buenos Aires, ISBN: 978-987-1505-09-8

My chapter in the was 2002 edition was ‘Fuel for the Living Fire: Labour-Power!’.

Details on the Spanish Edition (2009):

Ediciones Herramienta presenta:

EL TRABAJO EN DEBATE: Una investigación sobre la teoría y la realidad del trabajo capitalista

Ana C. Dinerstein, Michael Neary

Compiladores

Ediciones Herramienta, Buenos Aires, 304 páginas

ISBN: 978-987-1505-09-8

 

Temas:

John Holloway Clase y clasificación: en contra, dentro y más allá del trabajo, y Un marxismo reduccionista. • Simon Clarke La lucha de clases y la clase obrera: el problema del fetichismo de la mercancía • Werner Bonefeld Capital, trabajo y acumulación primitiva: clase y constitución • Graham Taylor Trabajo y subjetividad: repensar los límites de la conciencia obrera • Massimo De Angelis Hayek, Bentham y la máquina global del trabajo: la aparición del panóptico fractal • Harry Cleaver ¡El trabajo todavía es la cuestión central! Palabras nuevas para mundos nuevos • Michael Neary El trabajo se mueve: una crítica al concepto de “sindicalismo del movimiento social” • Glenn Rikowski Combustible para el fuego vivo: ¡la fuerza de trabajo! • Ana C. Dinerstein Recobrando la materialidad: el desempleo y la subjetividad invisible del trabajo • Ana C. Dinerstein y Michael Neary Antivalor en movimiento: el trabajo, la subsunción real y la lucha contra el capitalismo

Palabras de los editores

Un plan

Era una tarde fría de un jueves de septiembre de 2007. Llegamos al departamento donde se alojaba Ana junto a su familia. Esa tarde era la despedida, porque debía volver a Inglaterra. Nos encontramos entre juguetes, mate, facturas, sándwiches, familiares y amistades.

Días antes habíamos empezado el plan. Se nos había ocurrido una idea loca. Había sido en un instante fugaz, de esos que suceden en el éxtasis generado por lecturas irreverentes, por aquellos textos que dejan la planicie de las letras para provocar relieves en nuestras vidas. Puntos de fuga. Salidas al más allá. El plan se ponía en marcha, sólo faltaba una cómplice clave.

En medio de la reunión, nos retiramos unos minutos con Ana para conversar en privado. Allí fue cuando juntos, susurrando, como si estuviéramos armando una bomba, lanzamos nuestro plan.

— Ana, queremos traducir The Labor Debate. Es un texto fascinante y nos interesa que sea parte de las discusiones que circulan de este lado del charco. Por eso este libro tiene que ser editado en castellano. Nosotros nos encargamos de las traducciones.

Ana respondió afirmativamente. El plan se ponía en marcha. Su sorpresa y agradecimiento fue tan motivador como los textos mismos.

A los pocos días Ana nos confirmó que conseguiría el dinero para la publicación: Michael Neary, el otro compilador de la obra, fue quien se encargó de ello. Con esa noticia en nuestras manos reunimos a un grupo de traductores amigos: Carla Poth, Florencia Martínez, María de las Nieves Puglia, Mariana Carrolli y Nicolás Harambour. Junto a ellos se sumaron otros traductores y las manos estoicas que hicieron posible la publicación del libro, editando, terminando y realizando las traducciones faltantes, como así también enseñándonos el camino del quehacer editorial. Nos referimos, pues, a Francisco Paco Sobrino, Carlos Pipo Cuéllar, Sibila Seibert, Ignacio Chiche Vázquez y Néstor López.

Un cronopio llamado El Trabajo en Debate

El texto que estamos presentando desde Herramienta pertenece a esa rara especie de cronopios cortaziano. El mismo constituye un debate que tiene una forma muy particular: cada autor parece estar escuchando una misma canción al tiempo que hace su propio baile. Se conforma así un bricolage en el que el trabajo es puesto como el fuego que da vida. El debate nos recuerda que el trabajo, como el sol, se esconde en la inmensidad del firmamento para aparecer a través de la luz más destacada en la noche, la(s) luna(s), aunque ella misma ya no sea el sol.

Herramienta desde hace varios años se ha dado la tarea de dar a conocer una serie de autores que proponen un debate en y desde el marxismo en múltiples direcciones. Son autores que han dado lugar a esa dolorosa incomodidad teórica llamada marxismo abierto. Así Debate sobre el trabajo forma parte de un esfuerzo emprendido por Herramienta que –explorando el campo abierto por los compañeros y compañeras de dos revistas que han dejado su huella en la izquierda argentina, Cuadernos del Sur y Doxa– encuentra en este texto el incentivo para continuar la discusión en torno a un tema que parece haber sido olvidado en las ciencias sociales y que a su vez ha recibido un desigual tratamiento al interior del propio marxismo: el trabajo.

Son estos autores-cronopios los que, explorando la categoría trabajo, nos llevan a ver en ésta mucho más que una realidad empírica; nos trasladan con esta categoría hacia el estallido de las teorías famas y de las realidades empíricas. Son, en definitiva, autores cortazianos que nos provocan la sensación de que al terminar de leerlos sabemos que la única seguridad con la que contamos es la de estar viviendo en un mundo que resulta insoportable, y que, aunque no lo queramos, eso mismo que lo vuelve intolerable es nuestra producción.

Por ello, para el colectivo que conforma Herramienta es una alegría muy grande impulsar la edición de este libro. No sólo por la calidad de los textos, ni por la amistad que a nos une con los autores. Lo es porque seguimos reforzando el lugar que ocupa Herramienta: aportar al debate sobre el cambio revolucionario.

Desde la editorial queremos fervientemente que El Trabajo en Debate se transforme en una herramienta para el debate intelectual, militante y académico. Esta aspiración no es casual: nos encontramos hoy en un momento en que la teoría ha vuelto sobre sus pasos para refugiarse en la fuerza de lo constituido, en las “teorías seguras”. Asimismo, la práctica militante parece recostarse en la certeza de las formas constituidas. Pareciera ser que nuevamente nos encontramos ante el ocaso (del pesimismo) de la seguridad. Sin embargo, los textos que conforman este libro, a pesar de haber sido escritos hace ya diez años, contienen la actualidad de mirar allí donde la fuerza del presente encuentra su fortaleza en la irrupción del pasado no realizado. Dicho con otras palabras, el texto que estamos presentando no sólo posee vigor por los temas tratados, sino porque representa un modo teórico en el que la lucha contra lo constituido se produce desde la incomodidad de lo no sido aún.

Rodrigo Pascual y Luciana Ghiotto

Buenos Aires, 21 de abril de 2009

http://www.herramienta.com.ar

Bibliographic details for the original 2002 Edition:

Ana C. Dinerstein and Michael Neary (Eds.) (2002) The Labour Debate: An Investigation in to the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work, Aldershot: Ashgate.

ISBN: 0-7546-1779-3

Summary at the publishers (Ashgate) and ordering details: http://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calctitle=1&pageSubject=413&pagecount=11&title_id=4163&edition_id=4748

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk