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Tag Archives: Globalization and education

The World Bank and Education

THE WORLD BANK AND EDUCATION: CRITIQUES AND ALTERNATIVES

THE WORLD BANK AND EDUCATION

Critiques and Alternatives

Steven J. Klees, University of Maryland, USA; Joel Samoff, Stanford University, USA; and Nelly P. Stromquist (Eds.) University of Maryland, USA

Sense Publishers

For more than three decades, the World Bank has been proposing global policies for education.  Presented as research-based, validated by experience, and broadly applicable, these policies are ideologically driven,  insensitive to local contexts, and treat education as independent of international dynamics and national and local economies and cultures.  Target countries, needing resources and unable to generate comparable research, find it difficult to challenge World Bank recommendations.

The World Bank and Education:  Critiques and Alternatives represents a powerful challenge to World Bank proposals. Probing core issues—equity, quality, finance, privatization, teaching and learning, gender, and human rights—highlights the disabilities of neoliberal globalization. The authors demonstrate the ideological nature of the evidence marshaled by the World Bank and the accompanying policy advice.

Addressing key education issues in developing countries, the authors’ analyses provide tools for resisting and rejecting generic policy prescriptions as well as alternative directions to consider. Robert Arnove, in his preface, says, “whether the Bank is responsive to the critiques and alternatives brilliantly offered by the present authors, the book is certain to influence development and education scholars, policymakers, and practitioners around the globe.”

 

Sense Publishers

Comparative and International Education: A Diversity of Voices volume 14

ISBN 978-94-6091-902-2 hardback USD99/EUR90

ISBN 978-94-6091-901-5 paperback USD19/EUR17.50

April 2012, 268 pages

Sense Online: https://www.sensepublishers.com/product_info.php?products_id=1450&osCsid=f3d0c8f0782b298c81ab3847a87e65dd

Free Preview
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Buy this book at Barnes & Noble: paperback | hardback

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Paulo Freire

PAULO FREIRE: THE GLOBAL LEGACY

A Celebration of Freire’s 91st Birthday

A major international conference, Hamilton, New Zealand, November 26-28, 2012

A major international conference hosted by the University of Waikato, Te Whare Wananga o Waikato, New Zealand, November 26-28, 2012, will be held at the Novotel Hamilton Tainui Hotel on the banks of the Waikato River, in central Hamilton.

“Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity or it becomes the practice of freedom, the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world.” — Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

The University of Waikato, Te Whare Wananga oWaikatois delighted to be hosting a major international conference, “Paulo Freire: The Global Legacy” as a retrospective celebration of his work and its legacy and influence across the globe.

The University of Waikato, with a student population of about 13,000 and 2000 academic and support staff, is committed to delivering a world-class education and research portfolio, providing a full and dynamic university experience, distinctive in character, and pursuing strong international links to advance knowledge.

The University works closely with Maori tribes (iwi), particularly Tainui, to make the University accessible to Maori students and to foster an environment of success. http://www.waikato.ac.nz/maori/http://www.waikato.ac.nz/about/  &  http://www.waikato.ac.nz/

Paulo Freire, one of the greatest educators of all time, was born in Recife, Brazil, on September 19, 1921 and died of heart failure in Sao Paulo, Brazil on May 2, 1997. Freire taught Portuguese in secondary schools from 1941-1947 before becoming active in adult education and workers’ training. He was the first Director of the Department of Cultural Extension of the University of Recife(1961-1964). Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) is an argument for a system of education that emphasizes learning as an act of culture and freedom. His works became justly famous as he gained an international reputation for his program of literacy education especially for the rural and dispossessed in Northeastern Brazil. He was jailed by the new government after 1964 and was forced into a political exile that lasted fifteen-years, eventually returning to Brazil in 1979. As a living testimony, his many works have been translated into many languages, and have inspired the tradition of critical pedagogy.

The conference is aimed at experienced and new researchers, policy-makers and practitioners from all around the world who engage with Freire’s work in any of the following broad themes that the conference will be organized around:

·      Globalization

·      De-colonisation

·      Indigenous cultures

·      Cultural studies

A Stream in Portuguese is planned for Portuguese speaking delegates to present and discuss their research in Portuguese. Abstracts will be available in both English and Portuguese. Dr Ana Ratto, from  Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil, who is Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Education at University of Waikato, in 2012 is coordinating this stream which will take place on Tuesday 27 November 2012.

 For further information, contact ratto.ana@gmail.com

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

OUT OF THE RUINS: THE UNIVERSITY TO COME

Call for Papers

TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, 28, Fall 2012

This special issue of TOPIA seeks contributions (articles, offerings, review essays and book reviews) that reflect on the contemporary university and its discontents. Fifteen years after the publication of Bill Readings’ seminal book The University in Ruins and in the wake of the UK government’s new austerity budget, Nick Couldry and Angela McRobbie proclaim the death of the English university. InItaly, students demonstrating against the Bologna Process protect themselves from police with giant books. On the heels of severe budget cuts and increasing privatization in the California state system, protesting students occupy university buildings, while in British Columbia and Quebec hundreds of students gather for rallies against spiralling student debt and increasing corporate influence on campus.

Everywhere university systems are being eviscerated by neoliberal logics asserting themselves even in the face of economic recession. After decades of chronic under-funding and restructuring, public universities have ceded the university’s public role in a democracy and embraced “academic capitalism” as a “moral” obligation. Acting as venture capitalists, they pressure academics to transfer and mobilize knowledge and encourage research partnerships with private interests; acting as real estate developers, they take over neighbourhoods with callous disregard for established communities; acting as military contractors, they produce telecommunications software and light armoured vehicles for foreign governments; acting as brand managers, they open branch plant campuses around the world and compete for foreign students who can be charged exorbitant fees for access to a “first world” education. With tuition fees and student debt on the rise, academic labour is tiered, cheapened and divided against itself; two-thirds of classes inU.S.colleges and universities are taught by faculty employed on insecure, non tenure-track contracts.

The casualization of academic labour and a plea for sustainable academic livelihoods were at the core of the longest strike in English Canadian university history. As collegiality, academic freedom, and self-governance recede from view, the university remains a terrain of adaptation and struggle.   We will need all the conceptual tools that cultural studies can muster to analyze the changing university as the foundation for our academic callings and scholarly practices. In addition to external influences such as globalization, technoscience, corporatization, mediatization, and higher education policy, internal managerial initiatives, bureaucratization, deprofessionalization, structural complicity between administration and faculty, and intellectual subjectivities must also be analyzed.

All of us, no matter what our political position, must take the time to reflect on the broad questions raised by these changes. Is the site of the university worth struggling over or re-imagining? Can the neoliberal university be set against itself? Is it time for reform or exodus? What other practices of knowledge production, interpretations, modes of organization, and assemblages are possible? This special issue is designed to reflect upon, analyze and strategize about the past, present and future of the university.  

In addition to these matters of concern, possible topics to further dialogue and enable further study include but are not limited to:

  • Analyzing and assessing the crisis of the public university
  • Implementing globalizations: theory, rhetoric and historical experience
  • Continuity and transformation in national academic cultures
  • The position and role of the arts, humanities and social sciences
  • University leaders and university making
  • Managerial theory/practice, academic ethics, and the symbolism of university finance
  • University-private sector intermediaries and initiatives; “innovation” and “creativity” as alibis for academic capitalism; knowledge “transfer” and “mobilization”
  • Marketing, media relations and the promotional condition of the university
  • Space, time, speed and rhythm in the network university
  • The professor-entrepreneur, research practice, and the imperative to produce
  • Academic labour, tenure, stratification and precarity
  • Faculty governance, unions and institutional democracy
  • The indebted, student-worker and the decline of academic study
  • Scholarly disciplines and territories, infrastructure, information practices, communication and publishing
  • The scholarly community of money: grant agencies, writing, committees and adjudication
  • Media/cultural production and critical/radical pedagogy
  • The development of knowledge cultures and the expansion of the commons
  • The university in relation to nearby communities and wider social movements
  • Resistance, common and counter-knowledge, alternative educational formations

Submissions  

To view the author guidelines, see: http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/topia/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.

To submit papers (with titles, abstracts and keywords) and supplementary media files online, you need to register and login to the TOPIA website at: http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/topia/user/register.  

The deadline for submissions is February 15, 2012.

Peer review and notification of acceptance will be completed by May 15, 2012.

Final manuscripts accepted for publication will be due July 5, 2012.

 

Comments and queries can be sent to Bob Hanke bhanke@yorku.ca or Alison Hearn ahearn2@uwo.ca.

For more information about TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, visit www.yorku.ca/topia.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Militant Boy

GLOBAL STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD – VOLUME 1 NUMBER 2 (2011)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/GSCH/content/pdfs/1/issue1_2.asp

GLOBAL STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD
Volume 1 Number 2 2011, ISSN 1463-9491
 

SPECIAL ISSUE
CHILDREN ON THE MOVE: The impact of involuntary and voluntary migration on the lives of children
Guest Editors: ADA LAI & RUPERT MACLEAN

Ada Lai & Rupert Maclean. Editorial. Children on the Move: the impact of involuntary and voluntary migration on the lives of children

Ravinder Sidhu, Sandra Taylor & Pam Christie. Schooling and Refugees: engaging with the complex trajectories of globalisation

Su-Ann Oh. Rice, Slippers, Bananas and Caneball: children’s narratives of internal displacement and forced migration from Burma

Rajeshwari Asokaraj. Resisting Bare Life: children’s reproduction of quotidian culture in a Sri Lankan camp

Antonina Tereshchenko & Helena C. Araújo. Stories of Belonging: Ukrainian immigrant children’s experiences of Portugal

Celeste Y.M. Yuen & Rosalind Wu. New Schooling and New Identities: Chinese immigrant students’ perspectives

 

COLLOQUIUM

Kim Fong Poon-McBrayer. Model Minority and Learning Disabilities: double jeopardy for Asian immigrant children in the USA

 

BOOK REVIEW
Childhood and Consumer Culture (David Buckingham & Vebjrg Tingstad, Eds), reviewed by Keith Cranwell
PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe immediately you may do so online at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeGSCH.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editors at GSCH@ied.edu.hk

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th JUNE 2011

EVENTS

CFP: CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR STUDY OF HIGHER EDUCATION (CSSHE) CONFERENCE: HIGHER EDUCATION, GLOBALIZATION, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

November 3 to 4, 2011
Morris J. Wosk Centre
Simon Fraser University
Vancouver, B.C.

Higher education has become more international, even globalized. Countries such as Canada have developed mass systems for higher education; these systems now serve the majority of the population through a highly diversified system of institutions. While the globalization of higher education presents exciting opportunities, there are concerns. Chief among these concerns is that globalization can result in neglect of the traditional social justice function of many public and private institutions, particularly if the reason for “going global” is primarily financial.

This conference will focus on both the opportunities and dangers of globalization of higher education. It will bring together researchers, administrators, policy analysts, and students from Canada and elsewhere. Within the overall theme of the conference, proposals for concurrent sessions and panels are invited.

Proposals of up to 400 words (for papers) and 800 words (for panels) should be submitted by or before June 30, 2011. Presenters and panel conveners will be notified by July 22, 2011 at the latest if their proposal has been accepted.

Conference details and registration information will also be available on: http://ocs.sfu.ca/leadingchange/index.php/csshe/. For more information about CSSHE go to: http://www.csshe-scees.ca/. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Conference cochair Dr. Michelle Pidgeon, michelle_pidgeon@sfu.ca

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STOP WAGE THEFT CAMPAIGN – SUPPORTERS MEETING

June 27, 2011
6 p.m.
720 Spadina Ave, Suite #223
(Main intersection Spadina Ave and Bloor, south of Spadina subway station)

Get involved in the Stop Wage Theft campaign!

Support workers who are speaking out!

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Stop Wage Theft campaign. We had a great campaign launch at Beit Zatoun on May 13, 2011. We heard members of WAC speaking out against wage theft and sharing their experiences.

We would like to invite all supporters and allies interested in supporting the Stop Wage Theft campaign to come to a campaign supporters meeting on Monday June 27th at 6pm.

The campaign will be heating up over the next few weeks and we can definitely use support from allies!

Please let us know if you can come by contacting Nadira at nadira@workersactioncentre.org or (416) 531-0778, ext. 223.

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SOLIDARITY WITH EGYPTIAN WORKERS: REPORT-BACK FROM CAIRO

June 21, 2011
6:00pm – 7:30pm
Bahen Centre, room 3008
40 St. George
UofT, north of College
Toronto, ON

Egyptian workers played a key role in the toppling of Mubarak and are continuing the revolution, forming independent trade unions and striking for better conditions. Join a report back to hear what Egyptian workers are doing, and how you can help.

Sponsored by the International Socialists

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THE MADISON MOMENT: NORTH AMERICAN PUBLIC SECTOR COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

June 23, 2011
7:00pm – 9:00pm
CMA Student Lounge – Ted Rogers School of Management
Ryerson University
Toronto, ON

Over the last year or so there have been over 700 attacks in the United States upon public sector collective bargaining. This alarming trend is also finding root in Canada with the elimination of collective bargaining rights for transit workers, the legislation back to work of Crown prosecutors and government attempts to impose wage restraints upon the public sector. This free symposium will explore this issue through a distinguished panel of speakers.

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO: STOP SIGNS: CARS AND CAPITALISM ON THE ROAD TO ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL DECAY

Opening remarks by Jordy Cummings and Rick Salutin.

Featuring co-authors Bianca Mugyenyi and Yves Engler.

Drawing on their new book Stop Signs: Cars and Capitalism on the Road to Economic, Social and Ecological Decay, authors Bianca Mugyenyi and Yves Engler describe how the automobile’s ascendance is inextricably linked to capitalism and involved corporate malfeasance, political intrigue, backroom payoffs, media manipulation, racism, academic corruption, third world coups, secret armies, environmental destruction and war.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls107.php

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ACT NOW! CANADA: NO BACK-TO-WORK LEGISLATION AT CANADA POST

(from LabourStart)

Postal workers across Canada could be forced back to work under a proposed law that the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) is calling unnecessary, unjust, and counterproductive. Minister of Labour Lisa Raitt has served notice of the government’s intent to introduce back-to-work legislation.

This legislation is contrary to ILO Conventions and contravenes the fundamental right of all workers to organize and to bargain collectively. It indicates clearly where the new Conservative Party government of Canada intends to take labour relations in that country.

Canada Post’s focus on concessions has made it impossible to negotiate. CUPW members are fighting to keep their collective agreement from being eroded and are also resisting wage rollbacks for new hires.

Please join the global campaign to preserve collective bargaining rights in Canada by sending a message to the Canadian government: http://www.labourstart.org/cgi-bin/solidarityforever/show_campaign.cgi?c=1022

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2009 FIGURES SHOW GROWTH RATE OF POVERTY IN ONTARIO THE HIGHEST OF ALL REGIONS IN CANADA SINCE 2007 ELECTION

(from Social Planning Network of Ontario)

Statistics Canada figures released this week show that Ontario’s poverty rate increased to 13.1% in 2009, a growth rate of 17% since the 2007 provincial election year.

“Using the province’s official low income poverty measure, Ontario’s poverty rate of 13.1% is slightly below the Canadian average of 13.3%,” comments Peter Clutterbuck, Coordinator of SPNO’s Poverty Free Ontario campaign, “the rate of Ontario’s poverty growth, however, has increased the highest of all other regions of Canada since 2007.” A total of 1,689,000 Ontarians in 2009 lived in poverty, which is 277,000 more than in 2007.

While the rate of poverty growth by age group is lowest among children at 3.5%, Poverty Free Ontario notes that the proportion of working age adults (18 to 64 years old) living in poverty increased from 11.2% to 13.4%, a growth rate of 19.6%. Ontarians 65 years and older also show an extremely high poverty growth rate of 41.9% since 2007, although the overall proportion of seniors in poverty still remains below 9%.

Read more: http://www.spno.ca/Media-Release/2009-figures-show-growth-rate-of-poverty-in-ontario-the-highest-of-all-regions-in-canada-since-2007-election.html

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AS LABOUR FIGHTS MULTIPLY, SO TOO WILL THE VICTORIES

By Morna Ballantyne, rabble.ca

The ground shifted for the Canadian labour movement this week. Monday night 4,000 thousand Air Canada workers walked off the job, joining 50,000 CUPW workers already on rotating strikes. CAW and CUPW-two unions that have made
breakthrough gains in past struggles-are blocking further stripping of their pension and benefit plans, and are refusing to agree to lower living standards for new workers.

Of course there have been other important confrontations over contract concessions in recent years, like the strikes against Vale Inco, the City of Windsor and the City of Toronto. But what is happening at Air Canada and Canada Post is different. For one thing, the disputes impact every part of the country. Second, both the CAW and CUPW bargaining units fall under federal jurisdiction and have forced Harper’s Conservative government to openly reveal its contempt of workers’ rights and collective bargaining.

But what is most important about the CAW and CUPW disputes is they demonstrate that union members are willing and able to take on a fight.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2011/06/labour-fights-multiply-so-too-will-victories

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(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):
Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

If you have any questions about the list, or have an event you would like to promote or news to share, send an email to csew-broadcast-oise-l@listserv.utoronto.ca Messages will be reviewed before posting.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd OCTOBER 2010

EVENTS

SEMINAR: THE TASKS OF THE CRITICAL SCHOLAR/ACTIVIST IN EDUCATION

with
Dr. Michael W. Apple, John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Tuesday, October 12, 2010
1:00 – 2:00 pm
OISE Building – 252 Bloor Street West
Second Floor, Room 2-211

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CONFERENCE: THE RACE TO GLOBALIZE HIGHER EDUCATION

January 21-22, 2011
Sutton Place Hotel, Toronto, ON

The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations (OCUFA) will be holding “The Race to Globalize Higher Education” to bring together speakers and participants from universities, research institutes, government, and the private sector in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

The fee for those registering on or before October 30, 2010, is $350.00, which includes continental breakfasts, lunch, refreshments and all materials.  The registration fee after October 30, 2010 is $400.00. The student rate is $150.00.

To register, please visit: http://www.ocufa.on.ca/conferences.c2011reg.gk

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CALL FOR PAPERS, WORKSHOPS AND PRESENTATIONS: WHEN UNIONS MATTER MOST – OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLABORATION AND SOLIDARITY

The Pacific Northwest Labour History Association’s (PNLHA) 43rd annual conference, presented in collaboration with the Simon Fraser University Centre for Labour Studies

June 17th – 19th, 2011
Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre, Vancouver, BC

The labour movement goes far beyond unionized workers. Significant struggles for workers’ rights have always involved non-union sectors, both locally and internationally. Some collaborations have been highly successful, others have left lingering distrust.

This conference seeks to find the best historical models for organizing, strategic alliances and coalitions, and to connect these models with contemporary actions to consider how the labour movement can strengthen for the future.

We invite proposals for academic research, panels, individual presentations, interactive workshops, drama, music, art, memorabilia displays and other forms of presentation. Interactive sessions are preferred and the reading of papers is discouraged.

Proposal deadline is January 14, 2011.  Please send a short summary and list of all presenters to Ms. Joey Hartman, PNLHA BC Vice President, by email to pnlha@shaw.ca, or by mail to #2402 – 6888 Station Hill Drive, Burnaby, BC,
Canada, V3N 4X5.

For further information contact Joey Hartman at 604-540-0245. For updates, check our website: http://www.pnlha.org

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NEWS & VIEWS

STRIKING IN A TIME OF AUSTERITY: THE NOSM STRIKE IN NORTHERN ONTARIO

by Scott Neigh, The Bullet

The 150 members of Unit 2 of Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) Local 677 have been on strike since August 16. The office, technical, and administrative workers at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) went on strike after almost a year of negotiations to try and achieve a first collective agreement. At the forefront of the struggle are basic quality-of-work and quality-of-life issues. But lurking in the background are larger questions of how workers in the broader public sector and their employers will position themselves with respect to the austerity agenda declared with such fanfare by world leaders at the G20 summit in Toronto in June, and affirmed in this year’s federal and provincial budgets by the Harper and McGuinty governments.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/417.php

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NEW REPORT REVEALS THE FUTURE OF LITERACY IN CANADA’S LARGEST CITIES

A new report from the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) provides an unprecedented look at the future state of adult literacy in Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal, from 2001 through 2031. 

Released to coincide with UNESCO International Literacy Day, The Future of Literacy in Canada’s Largest Cities uses statistical projections to generate literacy profiles for the country’s largest metropolitan areas. According to the report, the four cities will experience significant, above-average growth in the number of adults with low literacy in the coming decades.

Read more: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/Releases/20100908literacy2031.html

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REFORMER ELECTED TO HEAD ATU TRANSIT UNION

by Mark Brenner, Labor Notes

Larry Hanley was elected president today of the 190,000-member Amalgamated Transit Union, which organizes bus drivers in cities across the U.S. and Canada, by delegates to the ATU Convention.

Hanley helped found the Keep America Moving coalition to build support for mass transit. Labor Notes’ Mark Brenner interviewed Hanley this month about how he would run the ATU differently and organize transit workers together with community members.

Read more:
http://www.labornotes.org/blogs/2010/09/reformer-elected-head-ATU-transit-union

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SOCIAL PLANNING COUNCIL: CALL OUT TO CANDIDATES AND ORGANIZATIONS TO ENDORSE THE TORONTO OPEN BUDGET INITIATIVE DECLARATION TODAY

Social Planning Toronto is working with the Toronto Open Budget Initiative (TOBI) to get the word out to Mayoral and City Council candidates – it’s time to open the City’s budget process! TOBI, a broad-based group of residents and community organizations, is working to make the City’s budget process more open, transparent, inclusive and participatory. At present, residents and groups have only two opportunities to weigh in on the City budget process, both after most of the real decisions have already been made. In response to the lack of opportunity for meaningful civic engagement on the City’s capital and operating budgets, members developed the TOBI Declaration of Principles, Values and Recommended Actions to improve the City’s budget process. Principles and values include: inclusiveness, accessibility, integrity and transparency, influence, accountability, and flexibility and transformation. Recommended actions include changes to the process that would have residents and groups have their say throughout the budget process, starting at the early formative stages.

Are you a candidate for City Hall or a worker, volunteer or board member from a community group? We need to hear from you! Check out our new website at http://www.torontoopenbudget.ca to read over the TOBI Declaration and send in the Statement of Support to endorse these ideas for change. Deadline for submitting endorsements is Wednesday, October 6. After October 6, TOBI will be publicly releasing the list of endorsers. Event details to follow.

For more information or to join TOBI, please contact Beth Wilson at beth@socialplanningtoronto.org or call (416) 351-0095 x257.

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10 WAYS TO SOLVE THE JOBS PROBLEM

Imagine a no-holds-barred “summit” that comes up with ideas to solve both our job and environmental problems. What might it come up with?

Read more:
http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/a-resilient-community/10-ways-to-solve-the-jobs-problem

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VIDEO: THE VALUE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Newsroom/MultimediaCentre/AudioVideoArchive/LifelongLearning.html
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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

‘KNOWLEDGE WORKERS’ AS THE NEW APPRENTICES: THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANISATIONAL AUTONOMY, GOALS AND VALUES ON THE NURTURING OF EXPERTISE

Alison Fuller and Lorna Unwin
Vocations and Learning
Volume 3, Number 3, 203-222, DOI: 10.1007/s12186-010-9043-4
http://www.springerlink.com/content/qk662k1662437628/

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GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE CORRELATES OF VOLUNTEERING AND CHARITABLE GIVING
Christopher J. Einolf
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 28 September 2010
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010385949v1

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THE CHINESE REFORM EXPERIENCE: A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT
Martin Hart-Landsberg
Review of Radical Political Economics published 28 September 2010
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0486613410383954v1

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JOB POSTINGS

PROGRAM DIRECTOR, CHILD CARE CATERING
Real Food for Real Kids
Toronto, Ontario

Start date: November 1, 2010
Interviews: October 14-15, 2010
Hours per week: Full time
Compensation: Commensurate with experience & ability
Application Deadline: 12:00 noon on Oct 12, 2010

Real Food for Real Kids (RFRK) is Canada’s leading all-natural catering company for child care centres, schools and camps. Every day, we cook and deliver delicious meals and snacks to over 5,000 children throughout the GTA. We make food fresh from scratch using only natural ingredients, including as much local and organic food as possible.

About the Program Director for Child Care Catering:
You’ll take on responsibility for the development, growth, and delivery of
the child care catering program at RFRK.

We’re looking for a rare breed: part strategic superhero, part relationship builder, part manager, and all business (except when they’re not). Someone who can run a tight ship, but is loved by everyone sailing it. We need a problem-solver, cut-to-the-chaser, seasoned listener, and motivational speaker wrapped into one.

For more details and to apply: http://www.goodworkcanada.ca/greenjobs.php?id=12430

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EDUCATION COORDINATOR, NORTH YORK HARVEST FOOD BANK
Toronto, Ontario

North York Harvest Food Bank is one of Toronto’s largest food banks. An independent not-for-profit organization, we work with communities who face short-term emergencies and long-term poverty in northern Toronto.

Position Summary

The Education Coordinator develops and facilitates learning opportunities for North York Harvest stakeholders including visiting schools and corporate volunteer groups. These include Sort & Learn Tours which are conducted on-site and combine a classroom activity with a food sorting activity. We also offer off-site workshops for school and community groups.

Reporting Relationship: The Education Coordinator reports to the Senior Manager, Community Engagement.

Hours: 15 hours/week including some weekend or evening hours.

For more details and to apply:
http://www.goodworkcanada.ca/greenjobs.php?id=12415

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For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

No Future

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Crisis Sublime

THE PHENOMENON OF OBAMA AND THE AGENDA FOR EDUCATION

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

The phenomenon of Obama and the agenda for education: Can hope audaciously trump neoliberalism?

Under Contract with Information Age Publishing

Co-editors:

Dr. Paul R. Carr: Educational Foundations, Beeghly College of Education, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH, USA, 44555, prcarr@ysu.edu http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio: Educational Leadership, School of Education, Lewis University, Chicago, IL, USA, porfilio16@aol.com

Paul R. Carr is originally from Toronto, and now resides in Montreal. He studied for two years in France in the early 1980s, and then undertook the rest of his university studies in Canada in the areas of political science, sociology and education. He completed his doctorate in the sociology of education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto in 1996, with his thesis examining anti-racism and institutional culture in education. For the past few years, he has been a professor at Youngstown State University, where he teaches courses in multicultural education, the sociology of education, diversity and leadership, and qualitative methodology. His current research is broadly concerned with social justice, with specific threads related to critical pedagogy, democracy, media literacy, and intercultural education. In 2007, he co-edited The Great White North? Exploring Whiteness, Privilege and Identity in Education ( Rotterdam : Sense Publishers), and, in 2008, co-edited another book, entitled Doing Democracy: Striving for Political Literacy and Social Justice ( New York : Peter Lang). He is currently finalizing two other edited books dealing with intercultural education and youth culture, respectively, as well as a single-author book on critical pedagogy and democracy. Paul is the co-founder and co-director of the Global Doing Democracy Research Project, which aims to produce a range of studies on the international level, leading to critical, comparative analysis of how democracy and education can be more effectively connected. He has a blog on the Paulo and Nita Freire International Center for Critical Pedagogy on the theme of democracy. Lastly, he has been involved in a range of projects and initiatives in relation to solidarity with Latin America. His website is: http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio is Assistant Professor of Education at Lewis University in Romeoville, IL. He teaches courses on critical pedagogy, qualitative research, globalization and education, multicultural education, foundations of education, and curriculum theory in the Educational Leadership for Teaching and Learning Doctoral Program. The Educational Leadership Program at Lewis University is unique in its critical and transformative focus where students are prepared to become transformative educational leaders who are deeply discerning, knowledgeable and approach the educational system as a potential avenue for challenging and transforming the status quo. Dr. Porfilio received his PhD in Sociology of Education in 2005 at the University at Buffalo. During his doctoral studies, he served as an Assistant Professor of Education at Medaille College and D’Youville College, where he taught courses across the teacher education spectrum and supervised pre-service and in-service teachers from Canada and the US. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, edited volumes, and conference papers on the topics of urban education, critical social studies education, neoliberalism and schooling, transformative education, teacher education, gender and technology, and cultural studies.

Premise for the book:

Obama is, arguably, popular at home and (especially) abroad, especially among people of “color”. Expectations are high that he will transform the United States. His style, message and presence are extremely attractive, especially following eight years of problematic leadership in the White House.

Why is Obama popular? Does he provide hope, as he eloquently argued throughout the electoral campaign? Can he change society when the two-party system, combined with an overpowering neoliberal economic model, is infused into the cultural and political landscape of society? Will he challenge the military-industrial model, scaling back the 750 US military bases in a hundred countries and untold billions being spent on military purposes? Will he dismantle monopolistic, undemocratic business practices that supposedly underpin the marketplace? How will he promote meaningful critical engagement and change in relation to race, discrimination, marginalization and differential power relations?

The above questions are fundamental to framing a debate around what type of hope and change we are considering. To undertake an analysis of what this means in real terms of change, we are seeking progressive scholars to interrogate Obama’s education vision, agenda and policies, and, further, to assess how well the education agenda might address the broader call for change. While this is early in Obama’s first term, we consider education to be the lynchpin to promoting a paradigm of engagement that advances social justice while contextualizing neoliberalism. We have found only one book that addresses the Obama agenda but this work is not a critical diagnosis of the issues.

Globalization is not simply a concept that leads to prosperity for all, and continuing to consider education as a consumer-good, rather than a public good, can serve to reinforce social inequities. Moreover, the antipathy that many people around the world exemplify toward Americans, often focused on US foreign policy, will not be diminished if Americans themselves are not more engaged with “others”. Education is the key to critically understanding and challenging war, patriotism, inequities, injustices, and building a more robust, dynamic and meaningful democracy.

The challenges in education are enormous, given the effect of several years of No Child Left Behind. Obama’s early indications at changing education policy have left some believing that the substance is much more conservative than the style. Support for charter schools and merit pay for teachers have left some wondering if the US will further slide into decay internationally, where it traditionally does poorly on comparative assessments. Renowned cultural studies scholar Henry Giroux has commented that Obama’s plans for education will serve to further disenfranchise marginalized groups.

We are interested in examining the state of public education under Obama, and how education may or may not be used as a lever to transform society, to effectively build the socio-cultural and political architecture that can buttress a diminution of racial, ethnic, religious, gender and class cleavages. Thus, understanding and interrogating neoliberalism will be an integral focus of this book, seeking to determine if the change espoused from above (the Obama government) can find its way into the classroom, the community and workplace.

Our conceptual framework is inspired by the burgeoning critical pedagogical movement (Freire, Giroux, Kincheloe, Macedo, McLaren, Steinberg). As Freire has underscored, education is a political project, and our analysis will critically dissect and unravel the policy, curricular, pedagogical and socio-political contextual variables, manifestations and proposals framing the Obama educational agenda.

With trillions of dollars being spent on bailouts of banks, insurance companies and car manufacturers, in addition to the endless stream of funds being allocated for war, little attention has been paid to the importance of education. Yet, education is where society can be transformed or re-produced.

This book will not only provide a detailed, critical analysis of the Obama education agenda. It will also provide proposals and insight into an alternative vision for education, one that takes into consideration neoliberalism, and seeks to neutralize it through critical pedagogy.

Audience:

 This volume will be a valuable resource to instructors who teach in the fields of teacher education, social studies, educational leadership, social work, social, cultural and philosophical foundations of education, sociology, political science, and global studies as well as their students. It may also be of interest to researchers, scholars, and the broader education public as well as mainstream and media sources.

Time-frame:

1)      Proposals due by March 1, 2010;

2)      Confirmation of selected chapters by April 1, 2010;

3)      Contributors will have their first drafts completed by June 15, 2010.

4)      The editors will review these first drafts, and provide authors detailed comments and suggestions by July 15, 2010.

5)      The contributors will make all of the necessary edits, and send the final chapters to the editors by September 1, 2010.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Knowledge Production under Neoliberal Capitalism

 

A Symposium at Radical Notes

23rd September 2008

 

The papers from this Symposium are now online at Radical Notes, at: http://radicalnotes.com/content/blogcategory/19/43/

 

 

These papers include:

 

Class, the Crisis of Neoliberal Global Capital, and the Role of Education and Knowledge Workers – by Dave Hill

 

The Culturalisation of Class and the Occluding of Class Consciousness – by Deb Kelsh and Dave Hill

 

Education Toward War – by Faith Agostinone-Wilson

 

Neoliberalism and the Hijacking of Globalization and Education – by David Hursh

 

How Shall We Live as Lambs Among Wolves? Reason-Passion-Power and Organization – by Rich Gibson

 

The Evolution of Knowledge Production in Capitalist Society – by Curry Malot

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas, at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk