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No Future

No Future

NO PRESENT: NEW ENCOUNTERS IN FRENCH AND ITALIAN THOUGHT

March 13-14, 2015

Villanova University

Keynote: Jason E. Smith

The negotiation between French and Italian activists and intellectuals in the latter part of the twentieth century (marked by 1968 in France and 1977 in Italy) opened a field of theoretical experimentation, the effects of which pose a challenge for contemporary politics. This encounter materialized through various collectives, traversing the neat intellectual and practical boundaries of the academy. Whether through the images of intellectuals in the streets or through radical activist groups extending from the Situationist International to Tiqqun, the laboratory of French and Italian thought poses a constellation of conceptual weapons that remain vital for any contestation with the state of things. These implements have been successful in intervening within contemporary struggles on the level of theory, practice, and the construction of history in the present.

Under the inheritance of this tradition, this conference invites submissions from the interstices and margins of recent French and Italian philosophy. Possible paper topics include feminist recapitulations of post-workerism, the theoretical legacy of biopolitics as it is taken up in Agamben and Esposito, and the ongoing challenges for theory and practice posed by social movements extending from Latin America to the Mediterranean in the wake of events such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation.

Other topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Post-Althusserian philosophy
  • Decolonial challenges to eurocentric thought and strategies
  • Wages for Housework and care economies
  • Realism and contemporary cntologies
  • Re-interpretations of the Gramscian legacy
  • Philosophies of life and the problem of vitalism
  • Lacanian psychoanalysis and its heritage
  • French and Italian receptions of Spinoza, Hegel, and Marx
  • Affect theory and imagination in cultural productions (e.g. film and media)
  • Left Heideggarian reflections on community between Nancy and Agamben

 

The Philosophy Graduate Student Union at Villanova University welcomes graduate students and junior faculty to submit any of the following to be considered for our conference: paper abstracts of 250-350 words, papers of approximately 3000 words (including co-authored work) suitable for a 20 minute presentation, or proposed panels. Authors of accepted abstracts should send completed papers by March 1, 2015.

Please send submissions, prepared for blind review, by Dec. 21, 2014 to YUcont2015@gmail.com

This conference is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Conference participants and attendees are encouraged to contact the above email address to discuss accommodations.

Villanova University (About): http://www1.villanova.edu/content/main/about.html

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

STUDIES IN MARXISM – VOLUME 13

Studies in Marxism Volume 13

This is now available. Purchasing it will also renew your membership of the specialist group. Contact Mark Cowling: C.M.Cowling@tees.ac.uk for details.

Table of Contents

Revolutionaries Seldom Harvest the Fruit: The 17th Bouazizi 2010
Sabah Alnasseri

Eliminate Capitalism and Distrust Socialism: What Remains of Marxism?
Alberto Martínez Delgado

Eliminate Marxism and Distrust Socialism: a Reply to Martínez Delgado
Joe Femia

The Spectral Proletariat: The Politics of Hauntology in The Communist Manifesto
Tim Fisken

Culture, Community and Cognition: A Vygotskian Foundation for a Republican Approach to Deliberative Democracy
Martyn Griffin

Beyond Dominion, Beyond Possibility of Justice
Leonard Mazzone

The Elephant in the Room: Agamben’s ‘Bare Life’ and Marxist Biopolitics
Arthur C Whittall

Communism without self-emancipation: a critique of Slavoj Žižek’s concept of ‘divine violence’
Alan Johnson

Towards a Critical Future of Technology? ‘Futurism from below’, Wall-E, and the emergence of hyper-consumerism as subjectivity
Mark Edward

Reviews

Kevin B. Anderson
Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies

Sean Sayers
Marx and Alienation: Essays on Hegelians Themes.

Marcello Musto (ed.)
Marx for Today

Mahamdallie, H (ed.)
Defending Multiculturalism: A Guide for the Movement

V. I.  Lenin
Revolution, Democracy, Socialism: Selected Writings. Edited by Paul Le Blanc

Kieran Allen
Marx and the Alternative to Capitalism

Matthew Johnson (ed.)
The Legacy of Marxism:  Contemporary Challenges, Conflicts and Developments

Garry Browning
Global Theory from Kant to Hardt and Negri.

Andy Merrifield
Magical Marxism, Subversive Politics and the Imagination.

Sebastian Dullien, Hansjörg Herr and Christian Kellerman
Decent Capitalism: A Blueprint for Reforming our Economies

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/studies-in-marxism-volume-13

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Religion

Religion

THE RELIGION OF CAPITAL: SOME UNFAITHFUL REFLECTIONS ON WEBER, BENJAMIN AND AGAMBEN

Seminar by Dr Alberto Toscano (Sociology, Goldsmiths), which is part of RUPE Political Theology seminar series 2013

14 March 2013, 05:30 – 19:30

Richard Hoggart Building, Room 141
Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW

This talk will explore the links between political theology and economic theology that can be gleaned from the writings of Max Weber, Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben and others (among whom Marx’s nephew Paul Lafargue, author of the curious drama ‘The Religion of Capital’). The aim of the exercise will be to ascertain the extent to which a confrontation with the real abstractions of capital can serve to problematise the recent centrality ascribed to political theology in general, and sovereignty in particular, as a matrix for social power in our societies. Or, what the abstract domination of capitalist equivalence as ‘the religion of everyday life’ (Marx) may tell us about the continued function of the sovereign decision.

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/alberto-toscano-the-religion-of-capital-some-unfaithful-reflections-on-weber-benjamin-and-agamben-goldsmiths-14-march

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Autonomy of the Political

The Autonomy of the Political

THE AUTONOMY OF THE POLITICAL: CONCEPT, THEORY, FORM

This booklet brings together four topical essays on the subject of autonomy and the concept of the political in twentieth century political philosophy presented at a conference at the former Jan van Eyck Academie in 2011.

The booklet makes for a very good introduction to a specialised debate with essays by Sara Farris, Dario Gentili, Elettra Stimilli, and Tracy B. Strong. It is presented with a general conceptual introduction by the editors Nathaniel Boyd and Michele Filipinni, and followed by a visual exploration of the concept by Luisa Lorenza Corna who is also responsible for the design of the booklet.

The essays cover a broad range of subjects, from the Italian workerist tradition (with a particular emphasis on Mario Tronti) to Agamben, the Schmitt/Kojève debate, to a philosophical interrogation of the autonomy of the political more generally.

Anyone with a keen interest in this subject will find the booklet a valuable edition, a source of varied thoughts and reflections on the autonomy of the political and its tradition, as well as a critical engagement with its figures and ideas.

You can purchase it on Amazon by the following the link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Autonomy-Political-Concept-Theory/dp/9072076672/refsr_1_4?ieUTF8&qid%2057324083&sr8-4

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-autonomy-of-the-political-concept-theory-form

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Critique

Critique

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 9 – JULY-DECEMBER 2012

Kritikos, V.9: July-December-2012

http://intertheory.org/work.htm

 

CONTENTS:

Philosophy, Theology and the Narrative of Hope…(g.dargan)

Barbie and the Power of Negative Thinking: Of Barbies, Eve-Barbies and I-Barbies…(t.botz-bornstein)


Beyond the Landscape, or Agamben and the Impotentiality of Art…(m.jecu and j.pinto)


Of Religion and Politics: Refusing the Space-Between…(g.finn)


Kritikos Reviewshttp://intertheory.org/reviews.htm

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Feminism

Feminism

FEMINIST CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Please find below the Call for Applications for the upcoming Feminist Critical Analysis course, which will take place in Dubrovnik(Croatia) from May 28 to June 1. Note that the extended deadline is April 28, but we urge you to apply as soon as possible.

We would also like to draw your attention to the stipends offered to doctoral/PhD students by the Inter-University Center in Dubrovnik. You can find more information here: http://www.iuc.hr/hesp-osi.php  

Sincerely yours,
Center for Gender Studies Jove Ilića 165 11000 Belgrade

———————————

Feminist Critical Analysis
Inter-University Center (IUC), Dubrovnik
May 28th to June 1st, 2012

The Center for Gender and Politics of the Belgrade University (Political Science Department), Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers of the State University of New Jersey, and the Department of Gender Studies of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest are pleased to announce the next annual postgraduate course in

Feminist Critical Analysis: Science, Bodies and the New Materialism

The course will be held at the Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik (www.iuc.hr) from May 28 to June 1 (2012).

The course is co-directed by Dasa Duhacek, Center for Gender and Politics, University of Belgrade, Ethel Brooks, Women’s and Gender Studies Department, Rutgers University and Anna Loutfi, Gender Studies Department, Central European University (CEU).

The course is built on the intellectual dialogue among a diverse body of scholars from different geographical locations and the participating faculty is drawn from different universities.

Topic

The seminar invites discussion of a key issue currently bringing together disciplines from across the humanities, social, physical and life sciences: the nature of materiality. What are the significant philosophical and theoretical contributions to materialism – past and present? Why does it become necessary for political or social theory to engage with particular ideas of materialism or materiality at certain historical junctures? What does it mean to speak of the social, cultural, political and historical meanings of natural or material concepts? How might the ‘natural sciences’ incorporate social theories of ontology and agency, and how might the ‘social sciences’ incorporate issues around materiality as they surface in, say, neurobiology or physics? How can knowledge help situate and make sense of embodiment and lived experience? We encourage explorations of ecological frameworks that challenge reductionist, mechanistic, and exclusively molecular approaches to life and living systems. We encourage reading and debate around the work of contemporary thinkers in the fields of biopolitics who interrogate ‘the politics of life itself’ (e.g. Giorgio Agamben). We also invite discussion around the work of ‘the new materialists’. This is a rich field that takes on a wide range of modern philosophical traditions. These include, but are not confined to, ‘vitalistic’ theories (e.g.Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze), neo-Marxian materialisms (Bourdieu, Balibar), phenomenological accounts of agency and materiality (Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger), theories of psychic power as a materialist force in the world (Nietzsche, Freud), feminist re-engagements with materiality, lived experience and biology (Moira Gatens, Elizabeth Wilson, Coole and Frost, Elizabeth Grosz), as well as social scientific investigations of problems in the neurosciences, such as the problem of consciousness or the mind-brain relation (Fernando Vidal).

ELIGIBILITY

IUC courses are conducted at a postgraduate level. All postgraduate students interested in the topic may apply for participation. Participants should seek funds from their own institutions to cover travel and accommodation costs. Limited financial support is available for participants from Central and Eastern Europe. All meetings are conducted in English.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

A short narrative (up to 250 words) explaining your interest in the topic and your C.V. with your current complete contact information should be submitted by e-mail;

Final deadline for applications is April 28, 2012

Please send your applications to the Center for Gender and Politics University of Belgrade, Faculty of Political Sciences, at studijeroda@fpn.bg.ac.rs with Dubrovnik 2012 in the subject heading.

 

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

 

Aesthetics

REVIEWS IN CULTURAL THEORY

Dear All

We’re writing to announce the publication of several new reviews accessible at reviewsinculture.com. We’d also like to invite you to contribute to RCT by offering to review one of the books listed in the latter half of this message.

New Reviews

The Pig Stays in the Picture: Visual/Literary Narratives of Human-Animal Intimacies: Susan McHugh. Animal Stories: Narrating Across Species Lines. University of Minnesota Press, 2011. 280pp.

No Exit? Imagining Radical Refusal: Simon During. Exit Capitalism: Literary Culture, Theory, and Post-Secular Modernity. Routledge, 2010. 280 pp.

Architectural Positions: Pier Vittorio Aureli. The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture. MIT Press, 2011. 251 pp.

Pattern Pre-Recognition: Richard Grusin. Premediation: Affect and Mediality in America after 9/11. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. 208 pp.

Reading Age and Disability in Film: Sally Chivers. The Silvering Screen: Old Age and Disability in Cinema. University of Toronto Press, 2011. 213 pp.

The Meaning of Christ and the Meaning of Hegel: Slavoj Žižek and John Milbank. The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? Ed. Creston Davis. MIT Press, 2009. 320 pp.

Affecting Feminist Subjects, Rewriting Feminist Theory: Clare Hemmings. Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory. Duke University Press, 2011. 272 pp.
Books Available for Review

In addition to inviting reviewers for the books listed below, we also welcome proposals for longer review essays, focusing on recently published (2012-) titles. If you are interested in contributing a review or a review essay to RCT, please write to us at editors@reviewsinculture.com.

Charles R. Acland. Swift Viewing: The Popular Life of Subliminal Influence. Duke University Press, 2012.

Giorgio Agamben. The Kingdom and the Glory: For a Theological Genealogy of Economy and Government. Trans. Lorenzo Chiesa and Matteo Mandarini. Stanford UP, 2011.

Alain Badiou. Trans. Gregory Elliott. The Rebirth of History: Times of Riots and Uprisings. Verso, 2012.

Lauren Berlant. Cruel Optimism. Duke University Press, 2011.

Bruno Bosteels. Badiou and Politics. Duke University Press, 2011.

Susan Brown, Jeanne Perreault, Jo-Ann Wallace, and Heather Zwicker, eds. Not Drowning But Waving: Women, Feminism and the Liberal Arts. University of Alberta Press, 2011.

James V. Catano and Daniel A. Novak, eds. Masculinity Lessons: Rethinking Men’s and Women’s Studies. John Hopkins University Press, 2011.

Eric Cazdyn. The Already Dead: The New Time of Politics, Culture, and Illness. Duke University Press, 2012.

May Chazan, Lisa Helps, Anna Stanley, and Sonali Thakkar. Home and Native Land: Unsettling Multiculturalism in Canada. Between the Lines Press, 2011.

Rey Chow. Entanglements, or Transmedial Thinking about Capture. Duke University Press, 2012.

Jean Comaroff and John L. Comaroff. Theory from the South: or, How Euro-America is Evolving Toward Africa. Paradigm, 2012.

William E. Connolly.  A World of Becoming. Duke University Press, 2011.

Grant H. Kester. The One and the Many: Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context. Duke University Press, 2011.

Vicky Kirby. Quantum Anthropologies: Life at Large. Duke University Press, 2011.

Tonya K. Davidson,OndinePark, and Rob Shields, eds. Ecologies of Affect: Placing Nostalgia, Desire, and Hope.  Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2011.

Kit Dobson and Áine McGlynn, eds. Transnationalism, Activism, Art. University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Boris Groys. Introduction to Antiphilosophy. Verso, 2012.

David Harvey. Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution. Verso, 2012.

Sharon Patricia Holland. The Erotic Life of Racism. Duke University Press, 2012.

Andrew Karvonen. The Politics of Urban Runoff: Nature, Technology and the Sustainable City. MIT Press, 2011.

Garry Neil Kennedy. TheLastArtCollege:Nova ScotiaCollegeof Art and Design, 1968-1978. MIT Press, 2012.

Katie King. Networked Reenactments: Stories Transdisciplinary Knowledges Tell. Duke University Press, 2012.

Michael G. Lacy and Kent A. Ono, eds. Critical Rhetorics of Race.New York University Press, 2011.

Stephanie Li. Signifying Without Specifying: Racial Discourse in the Age of Obama. Rutgers UP, 2011.

A. Ricardo López and Barbara Weinstein, eds. The Making of the Middle Class: Toward a Transnational History. Duke University Press, 2012.

Lucio Magri. The Tailor of Ulm: Communism in the Twentieth Century. Verso, 2012.

Walter D. Mignolo. The Darker Side of Western Modernity: Global Futures, Decolonial Options. Duke University Press, 2011.

Nicholas Mirzoeff. The Right to Look: A Counterhistory of Visuality. Duke University Press, 2011.

Martha Nussbaum. The New Religious Intolerance: Overcoming the Politics of Fear in an Anxious Age. Harvard UP, 2012.

Elizabeth A. Povinelli. Economies of Abandonment: Social Belonging and Endurance in Late Liberalism. Duke University Press, 2011.

S.S. Prawer. Karl Marx and World Literature. Verso, 2011.

Jacques Rancière. Staging the People: The Proletarian and His Double. Verso, 2011.

Jacques Rancière. The Intellectual and His People: Staging the People, Volume 2. Verso, 2012.

Sherene Razack, Malinda Smith, and Sunera Thobani,eds.Statesof Race: Critical Race Feminism for the 21st Century. Between the Lines Press, 2011.

Mark Rifkin. The Erotics of Sovereignty: Queer Native Writing in the Era of Self-Determination. University of Minnesota Press, 2012.

Gayle S. Rubin. Deviations: A Gayle Rubin Reader. Duke University Press, 2011.

Peter Sloterdijk. Bubbles: Spheres Volume I: Microspherology. Trans. Wieland Hoban. Semiotext(e), 2011.

Joe Soss, Richard C. Fording, and Sanford F. Schram. Disciplining the Poor: Neoliberal Paternalism and the Persistent Power of Race. University of Chicago Press, 2011.

Joan Wallach Scott. The Fantasy of Feminist History. Duke University Press, 2012.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization. Harvard UP, 2012.

Bernard Stiegler. The Re-Enchantment of the World: The Value of the Human Spirit vs Industrial Populism. Trans. Trevor Arthur. Continuum, 2012.

Tiqqun. Preliminary Materials for a Theory of the Young-Girl. Trans. Ariana Reines. Semiotext(e), 2012.

Jini Kim Watson. The NewAsianCity: Three-Dimensional Fictions of Space and Urban Form. University of Minnesota Press, 2011.

Robyn Wiegman. Object Lessons. Duke University Press, 2012.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Time

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME IN A TIME OF REVOLUTION

Call For Papers
As editors of a book proposal accepted for publication by Cambridge Scholar Publishing, we announce a call for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the connection between concepts of time and social change. The volume will have a strong focus on interdisciplinarity, the fusion of theory with practice, and presenting possibilities for ways in which the consideration of alternative notions of time could bring about social change. Thus it is not only practical philosophy papers that we invite, but also contributions from fields such as literary studies, media studies, cultural studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, sociology and political science.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution
The year 2011 marked a global turn in acts and ideas about revolution. Western culture and media categorized uprisings in Egypt, Libya, Yemen and other nations as “the Arab Spring.” Yet revolution does not take part only on the national stage: radical social change is constantly being called for globally on the levels of gender, race and class, reflecting a future-oriented view of time that aims to change the thrust of history.

Merely looking into the future is itself a limited way of evaluating approaches through which we can create a more just society. Philosophers have long critiqued the patriarchal, linear notion of time reflected in national narratives and teleological worldviews, which often function only to reinforce the status quo. Marx himself calls for an end to temporal limitations, while Negri considers the possibilities of kairos time, and Deleuze and Guattari the importance of becoming, expanding into Agamben’s and Benjamin’s notions of messianic time.

Time is thus not simply socially constructed notions of linear clock time and teleological conceptions of history, but rather time is an encounter that differs according to human experience. Julia Kristeva’s work on women’s time, for example, outlines the cyclical temporalities and specific subjectivities unique to women, while Robert Levine suggests that climate can have an effect on the pace of life in  various countries, although postcolonial writers have critiqued this perspective as at least uninformed if not racist. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies. 

Nations are held together by popular conceptions of shared times which often function to exclude minorities and repress their actual histories, while class antagonisms are partly characterised through ideas of productive time and leisure time.

The breaking and rupture of such a standardized conception of time which remains that of Western Modernity is the task of the essays being collected in this work, seeking “to brush history against the grain” as Benjamin would have it. Non-Western belief systems have also put forward alternative conceptions of time. Indigenous cosmologies, for instance, portray time as cyclical, while Buddhism separates time into tiny moments or even offers possibilities of transcending time. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution is interested in the intersection between theory and practice, including case studies that consider ways in which ideologies of time and alternative temporalities can be useful for solving conflicts and overcoming stereotypes created around questions of gender, race, ethnicity and socio-economic inequality. Time-perception is often used as a tool for marginalisation, but the alternative temporalities of the subaltern may also provide a way out of current restrictive policies around the world. The focus of the collection will be on time as an element of radical activism: how can visions of the future and the past, embodied time, untimely time, protest time and political time be implemented both theoretically and practically in order to change the way in which time functions as a vital element of social, political and cultural revolution?

As a thread that connects human life on so many levels, time is at once both subtle and dominating, reminding us that the moment of change must be seized before time itself, our creation, escapes us, or that to enact change we must escape or recreate time, or do something totally new with time. There has never been a better time to consider how both ancient and modern, philosophical and aboriginal conceptions of time and temporality might be employed in a quest to reconcile alternative  histories, and to bring about radical social change.

Please email expressions of interest in the form of an abstract (up to 500 words) with “Time and Revolution book proposal” in the subject line, as an attachment to Cecile Lawrence at (clawren1@binghamton.edu) by the 8th of January 2012, with a c.c. to Natalie Churn at messiahy@hotmail.comand, Christian Garland atchristiangarland@hotmail.com

Please send your completed submission as a Microsoft Word document by Sunday, the 31st of January 2012.

Contributions should be written in Times New Roman and follow the Chicago referencing style or we won’t consider them. Authors of accepted papers will receive a short guide to the specific Chicago method to be used for references. If your article includes images, please let us know in advance. Papers should be no more than 3,000  words in English or approximately 20 double spaced pages, inclusive of notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, must be the original work of the author, and previously unpublished. Please also include a brief biographical statement of no more than 50 words.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.
Co-editors Cecile Lawrence, Natalie Churn and Christian Garland.
https://sites.google.com/site/timeandrevolutionbookproject/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Antonio Negri

BIOPOLITICS OF THE COMMONS

Call for papers to the Colloquium “Biopolitics of the Commons”
Institute for Humanities and Faculty of Social Science and History
Diego Portales University
Santiago-Chile
Thursday, October 27th 2011, 15.00 – 20.30 hrs.

The commons has emerged as one of the key concepts around which social, political and cultural demands are being articulated and theorized today. Harkening back to the displacement of people from shared communal spaces and their transformation from public into private property – a central act in the development of European capitalism in the 18th and 19th centuries — the commons insists on the fundamentally shared character of social life: that everything from language to education, from nature to our genetic inheritance, belongs irreducibly to all of us; to a living which is, in that sense, always ours.

Moreover, in a national and global conjuncture, where the private seems to appropriate everything that is collective, this symposium will explore which are the possible answers given by the contemporary political theory to the so called “accumulation by dispossession”, based on the approaches of Antonio Negri, Giorgio Agamben, Roberto Esposito, Jean-Luc Nancy and Étienne Balibar, among others.

To this end, we invite scholars who would be interested in participate in this event, to submit an abstract of 300 words (in Spanish or English) by the August 30th, 2011to the professors Ricardo Camargo (ricardo.camargo@udp.cl) and Miguel Vatter (miguel.vatter@udp.cl) There will be a selection of the submitted proposals. The accepted applicants should send the complete paper at least two weeks before of the symposium’s date.

This symposium will count with the presence and participation of Antonio Negri, one of the most prominent political thinkers of our time. Professor Negri has been involved in developing a theoretical approach not only to the notion of the commons, but also to the notions of Empire, Multitude, Intellectual Labor, among others theoretical categories, all of which are embodied in his recent trilogy, co-authored with Michael Hardt: Empire, Multitude and Commonwealth.
The symposium will be closed with an open lecture given by Professor Negri.
 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

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Karl Marx

MARXISM AND PHILOSOPHY SOCIETY REVIEW OF BOOKS – UPDATE 20th APRIL 2011

New reviews just published online in the Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

·        Sutton on Jameson

·        Landa on Marx and progress

·        Calderbank on Vighi on Žižek

·        Short on Zartaloudis on Agamben

·        Garland on Crack Capitalism

New comments and discussion

And a new list of books for review all at: www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/

For notices of new reviews, comments, etc. join the Marx and Philosophy Society email list: (http://lists.topica.com/lists/mpslist)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Professor Sean Sayers,

Editor, Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

School of European Culture and Languages
University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NF, UK
Tel +44 1227-827513; Fax +44 1227-823641
http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/

***** 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Manufacturing Happiness

 

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Manufacturing Happiness: Investigating Subjectivity, Transformation, and Cultural Capital

The Graduate Students of George Mason University invite paper proposals for our 4th Annual Cultural Studies Conference. The Conference will take place on Saturday, September 19, 2009 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia

This conference considers practices, institutions, and products that promise happiness, in a sense of inducing “the good life,” typically expressed as self-realization or finding one’s purpose-borrowing Agamben’s term, subjective technologies that have a specific relationship to social and political forces. How do practices designed or claimed for such diverse purposes as personal stress management, recovering from colonization, parenting, global conglomeration, and corporate development work? What kinds of transformations do they bring, in terms of personality, power, and communitas? And what becomes of the living cultural traditions from which these practices are abstracted, as in the care of the psychotherapeutic practice of “western Buddhism,” which Zizek claims is the “hegemonic ideology par excellance of late capitalism?” From the transmission of packaged idealisms and practices with a putative relationship to traditional sources to the commodified transactions for services and goods, the conference organizers seeks papers that investigate the growing cultural industries, both global and local, devoted to manufacturing happiness.

The wide-ranging contexts for our investigation include, but are not limited to: the social positions within the family, home, workplace, community, or nation-state; geographical and global considerations of institutional development and affiliation; the political economy of corporate training models; cultural capital and legitimation; media and mediation (print, television, DVD, Internet, radio, etc.); religious connections and origins; the confirmation and construction of identities (gender, physical, class, spiritual, national, sexual, and race) in social or political realms; and the rise and intensity of ecological subjectivities.

Examples:
* Integral Institute, Integral Naked, and Ken Wilber
* Est Training
* Shambhala Training
* Eckhardt Tolle and Oprah’s Book Club
* Weight loss and Constructing Beauty
* The “Human Potential” Movement
* The Zen Alarm Clock
* The Secret
* Hollywood Kabballah Centre
* Transpersonal Psychology
* The “Self-Help” Industry
* Magazines such as What Is Enlightenment?

Please e-mail a 500-word abstract of your presentation along with a short CV to Michael Lecker (mlecker@gmu.edu) no later than June 15, 2009.

 

Additional information:

http://www.allconferences.com/conferences/2009/20090427183905/

http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=168118

http://culturalstudies.gmu.edu/happiness/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski