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Tag Archives: George Bush

STATE POWER AND DEMOCRACY: BEFORE AND DURING THE PRESIDENCY OF GEORGE W. BUSH

A new book by Andrew Kolin

Palgrave Macmillan

January 4th 2011

$85 Hardcover

ISBN 978-0-230-10935-3

Contact: Alaina Kunin, Publicist: T 646-307-5659, E alaina.kunin@palgrave-usa.com

Torture. Secret Prisons, Wiretaps on Americans. Even with a new president in the White House, daily headlines contain disturbing revelations about how theUnited Statesconducts itself in the “war on terror”. While other books have analyzed specific, shocking issues about the war on terror, there is a surprising disconnect in them: they don’t connect the actions with the George W. Bush administration to those of previous administrations. This book is the first to do that. It shows that the bush police state didn’t commence when Bush was inaugurated. It proves, instead, that the seeds of an American police state can be traced all the way back to the founding of the republic.

Praise for State Power and Democracy:

“Since the tragic events of 9/11, the United Sates has gutted its democratic ideals in the name of security while increasing its authoritarian tendencies as part of the war on terror. This book not only rigorously takes note of how the Bush administration (and increasingly the Obama government) undermined any promise of a democracy in the United Statesbut also vividly illustrates the long trajectory of authoritarian practices and punishing policies that have been deeply ingrained in American history. Andrew Kolin provides both a powerful warning and a wake-up call about the death of democratic ideals in the United States.” — Henry Giroux, Chair, English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University and author of Hearts of Darkness: Torturing Children in the War on Terror

“Andrew Kolin exposes the persistent efforts of autocrats to suppress popular democracy. His treatment is wide-ranging, historically informed, and most relevant to the police-state transgressions occurring in today’s America.” — Michael Parenti, author of God and his Demons and Contrary Notions

“This compelling book traces the assault on democracy and the rise of a police state that reached its zenith in the George W. Bush administration. From the war on communism to the war on terror, our government has used surveillance, preventive detention, torture, and a climate of fear to consolidate its power and neutralize dissent. Under the guise of nurturing democracy at home and abroad, the U.S.government has actually undermined it. Required reading for all who seek to recapture our democracy.” — Marjorie Cohn, Professor, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, and author of Cowboy Republic: Six Ways the Bush Gang Defied the Law

Growth of State Power and the Assault on Democracy * Eroding Democracy in a Time of Crisis * Accelerating the Assault on Democracy * Absolute Power at the Expense of Democracy * A Police State * Actions Taken Against Enemies of the State * Exporting An American Police State * The Future?

Andrew Kolin is a Professor of Political Science at Hilbert College. He is author of The Ethical Foundations of Hume’s Theory of Politics (1990); One Family: Before and During the Holocaust (2000); and State Structure and Genocide (2008).

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David Cameron

‘THE MEANING OF DAVID CAMERON’ – WITH RICHARD SEYMOUR

Wednesday, 26 May 2010
Time: 19:00 – 21:00
Location: Housmans Bookshop
Street: 5 Caledonian Road, Kings Cross
Town/City: London, United Kingdom

Description:
Richard Seymour, blogger of ‘Lenin’s Tomb’ fame, and author of ‘The Liberal Defence of Murder’ will be in store discussing his latest publication, ‘The Meaning of David Cameron’.

The Tories are posing as a ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ alternative to New Labour. Drawing from George W Bush’s ‘compassionate conservatism’, they maintain that the ‘Big Society’ can do what ‘Big Government’ cannot – produce a cohesive, mutually supportive, happy society. Cameron’s court intellectual, Philip Blond, maintains that this if David Cameron’, which is a viable alternative to the failures of the egalitarian left and the excessively pro-market right. But is this more than campaign mood music? And are the conservative traditions that they draw on – from the bucolic, pseudo-medievalism of G K Chesterton to the anti-statism of Friedrich Hayek – really a bulwark of progress and radicalism?

Richard Seymour argues that such ideas can only seem ‘progressive’ in light of New Labour’s acquiescence to Thatcherism. To understand the Cameronites, it is necessary to understand how the social landscape and corresponding political language was transformed by the collapse of post-war social democracy and its more radical competitors. To resist the Cameronites, he argues, it is necessary to attack the neoliberal consensus on which all major parties found their programme.

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Henry Giroux

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 1, 2010

Now available at
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/8/issue8_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 8 Number 1 2010, ISSN 1478-2103

Henry A. Giroux. Zombie Politics and Other Late Modern Monstrosities in the Age of Disposability

Sigrid Haunberger. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

Brian McKenna. Exposing Environmental Health Deception as a Government Whistleblower: turning critical ethnography into public pedagogy

John Opute. Managing Reward in Developing Economies: the challenge for multinational corporations

Alex Means & Kendall Taylor. Assessing the Debt: George W. Bush’s legacy and the future of public education under Barack Obama

Mark T. Yates & Richard D. Lakes. After Pell Grants: the neoliberal assault on prisoners

Khalida Tanvir Syed. Storied Understandings: bringing Aboriginal voices to Canada’s multicultural discourse

Stuart Tannock. Learning to Plunder: global education, global inequality and the global city

Janet Mansfield. ‘Literacies’ in the Arts: a new order of presence

D. Brent Edwards Jr. Trends in Governance and Decision-Making: a democratic analysis with attention to application in education

Tina (A. C.) Besley. Digitized Youth: constructing identities in the creative knowledge economy

OCCASIONAL THOUGHTS

Henry A. Giroux. Torturing Children: Bush’s legacy and democracy’s failure

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access). Subscription to the 2010 issues (i.e. full access to the articles in Volume 8, Numbers 1-6) is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. Personal subscriptions also include automatic free access to ALL PAST ISSUES. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

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For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact Professor Michael A. Peters (mpet001@illinois.edu).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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Noir

Noir

FILM NOIR, AMERICAM WORKERS AND POSTWAR HOLLYWOOD

 

New Noir Book:

“Busts This Town Wide Open”: Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood

Dennis Broe, University of Florida Press

Order now for a 40% Discount with Code Listed Below

Ever since French critics began using the term film noir in the mid-1940s, a clear definition of the genre has remained elusive. Broe’s interdisciplinary examination is a cogent argument for the centrality of class in the creation of film noir, demonstrating how the form itself came to fruition during one of the most active periods of working-class agitation and middle-class antagonism in American history.

In the 1940s, both radicalized union members and protagonists of noir films were hunted and pursued by the law. The book details how, after World War II, members of the labor movement who waged a series of strikes that paralyzed American industry, including Hollywood, were forced to use extralegal means because of pressure applied by new legislation such as the Taft-Hartley Act. In the same way the film noir protagonist moves further and further outside the law in this period until the films become a lament for a change hoped for but not achieved. The book then marks the sharp distinction between noir and the police procedural where the working class cop, now shorn of his or her radical sympathies, becomes the subject of the film.

A coda describes noir under Reagan and Bush (“A Thousand Points of Dark”) and post-9/11 noir which alternately resists and validates the replaying of the Cold War as the War on Terror.

What the Critics are saying:

‘[This is] an intriguing study of U.S. film noir as a left-wing cultural formation. Broe makes an informative and convincing case for the repressed, often overlooked working class determinants of early noir, and his discussion of individual films is consistently insightful. This is an important addition to the literature on the subject.’ James Naremore, author of More Than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts

‘With keen insight and a deep appreciation of the politics of film noir, Broe has broken new ground in the interpretation of cinema itself. With this book film noir has found its most astute and informed critic.’ Gerald Horne, author of Class Struggle in Hollywood, 1930-50

‘Broe puts the red back in the black. His book contours amidst the shadows of film noir those battles and tussles of the laboring classes that have too often been written out of film history, as out of the authorized narrative of U.S. history. Through wonderfully synthetic overviews and deft extended readings, a panoply of films is shown to chart in devious and overt ways the ups and down of union power and working class perspectives.’ Esther Leslie, author of Walter Benjamin and Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde

‘[The book is] a bracing alternative history of how noir represented the roiling state of American culture in the 1940s … His categorization scheme will carry great weight in all future discussion of noir’s thematic landscape.’ Donald Malcolm, Noir City Sentinel

For a special 40% discount, until October 1, 2009, call toll free 800-226-3822, or order online at: http://upf.com/book.asp?id=BROEXS07 with discount code NOIR9.

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‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’

Organised by the Department of Development Studies

School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

University of London

Convenor: Prof. Gilbert Achcar

2008-2009

LECTURE 1

 

 

THE IMPERIAL PARADOX:

IDEOLOGIES OF EMPIRE

FROM ALEXANDER THE GREAT TO GEORGE W. BUSH

 

 

PROFESSOR ELLEN MEIKSINS WOOD

Professor Emerita of Political Science at York University (Toronto, Canada)

 

Wednesday 29 October, 6:30pm

SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre, London

 

 

Professor Ellen Meiksins Wood is the author of many major books on the history of political thought and the history of capitalism.

Her most recent works include:

Citizens to Lords: A Social History of Western Political Thought from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (2008)

Empire of Capital (2005)

The Origin of Capitalism: A Longer View (2002)

— 
Gilbert Achcar
Professor of Development Studies & International Relations
University of London – School of Oriental and African Studies
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG
Phone +44 (0)20 7898 4557
Fax     +44 (0)20 7898 4759

 

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