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Tag Archives: Geo-politics

Cultural Marxism

MARXISM AND CULTURAL STUDIES

Call for Essays: Culture, Theory and Critique special themed issue on Marxism and Cultural Studies (special thanks to Indiana University’s Cultural Studies Program)

Many accounts of the emergence and development of Cultural Studies accord a central place to Marxism, both as a body of knowledge and as an important ideological component of the New Left. The rediscovery of the writings of Antonio Gramsci, George Luckacs, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor Adorno, among others, along with the formation of the Birmingham Centre for Cultural Studies, led to a general renaissance of Marxist theory and cultural analysis, which in turn resulted in ground-breaking studies of working class culture, the political role of new social movements that were not class based, the power of ideology and mass culture in sustaining existing social relations, and critical analyses of state-authoritarianism. As Cultural Studies crossed the Atlantic and gained an institutional foothold in the United States, some have feared that its engagement with Marxism has been diluted through an over emphasis on the subversive potentialities of mass media and consumer capitalism.

Some possible questions to consider:

 * How do we understand the relationship between the base and superstructure today?

* Does ideology critique still have an ongoing usefulness?

* Do globalization and the world recession require new objects of study?

* To what extent does Marxism provide a utopian impulse for existing social movements?

* Do iterations of Cultural Studies in South Asia, Africa, Central and Latin America, the Middle East, and
Eastern Europe retain a commitment to Marxism and how is this work revitalizing the field more broadly?

* Does the Marxist imperative to historicize challenge current paradigms of cultural analysis such as
the “New Formalism”?

* What exactly does a historical materialist methodology enable?

* How do we articulate media analyses with questions of political economy, geo-politics, and activism?

* What is the role of the intellectual in Cultural Studies?

We welcome essays that address any of these issues. The questions are not meant to be proscriptive, however, and we welcome queries about possible article content.

Abstracts (250-500 words) due September 15, 2011; final essays need to be submitted for peer review by October 31, 2011. Length 5,000-7,000 words including notes.

Send proposals and essays to Joan Hawkins, editor and Jen Heusel, editorial assistant ctcjourn@indiana.edu

Culture, Theory and Critique is a refereed, interdisciplinary journal for the transformation and development of critical theories in the humanities and social sciences. It aims to critique and reconstruct theories by interfacing them with one another and by relocating them in new sites and conjunctures. Culture, Theory and Critique’s approach to theoretical refinement and innovation is one of interaction and hybridisation via recontextualisation and transculturation.

 

‘Culture, Theory and Critique’: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/routledge/14735784.html

 

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BIO/GEO POLITICS OF RELIGION

2009-10 Seminar at Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, New York, NY

Bio/Geo Politics of Religion
Co-Directors:  Lee Quinby and Sylvia Tomasch

Macaulay Honors College at CUNY invites applications from New York area faculty and doctoral students for the second annual Macaulay Seminar to be held during the 2009-10 academic year.  The Macaulay Seminar seeks to generate lively discussion on a topic vital to our time, to enrich teaching, and to help facilitate research toward publication.

The seminar will meet once per month on Monday evenings throughout the year.  Each member of the seminar will be expected to participate fully in the Seminar and present a paper at the conference on the same topic to be held April 16-18, 2010 at Macaulay.  Participants will be selected from departments across academic divisions to encourage wide-ranging discussion.  All full-time faculty members and graduate students are eligible.  (Other interested parties are welcome to apply).  A stipend of $750 will be awarded to participants.

This seminar will explore what Michel Foucault called “biopolitics,” the relations of power that focus on the management of life, with specific regard to organized religions and practices of religious conduct.  Although recently religion has been widely recognized as a leading force in contemporary life, with movements of both faith-based solidarity and conflict being played out on the world stage, the present context has a long history through which these movements may be understood.  Relevant topics might include themes of apocalypticism and millennialism, the economics of evangelicalism, fundamentalist movements over time and space, the policing of bodies and souls, textual literalism and interpretation, bio- and geo-political conjunctions, manuals of guidance and techniques of surveillance, utopian religious communities in life and literature, and connections between ecos, bios, power, and justice.  Readings will be selected to accommodate the specific interests and expertise of the participants.

The Co-Directors:

Lee Quinby is the inaugural Visiting Professor at Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York City.  The author of three books, Millennial Seduction (1999), Anti-Apocalypse (1994), and Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of America (1991), she is also editor of Genealogy and Literature (1995) and co-editor of Feminism and Foucault (1988) and Gender and Apocalyptic Desire (2006).

Sylvia Tomasch is Associate University Dean of Academic Affairs at Macaulay Honors College and Professor of English at Hunter College, both in the City University of New York. Recent publications include articles on the history of medieval studies, Chaucer, medieval antisemitism, historical cartography, and medieval postcoloniality.

Application deadline:  July 30, 2009.  To request an application or for further information, email: lee.quinby@mhc.cuny.edu or sylvia.tomasch@mhc.cuny.edu

Macaulay Honors College
35 W. 67th Street
New York, NY 10016
t: (212) 729-2919
f: (212) 530-8130

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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