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Tag Archives: Gender and Education

Education for Debt

Education for Debt

THE NEOLIBERAL UNIVERSITY: GENDER, CLASS, AND SEXUALITY

AMSTERDAM RESEARCH CENTER GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Conference: ‘Social Class in the 21st Century’

Panel Call for Papers: Deadline May 29th 2015

Panel on: The Neoliberal University: Gender, Class, & Sexuality

This panel intends to investigate processes of bureaucratization and business-afication of the university and the role that these have in re-shaping the interrelations of class, gender, and sexuality; and the specific ways that the change from educational pedagogy to business model has impacted classed, gendered, and sexual practices and relationships.

The rise of neoliberalism coincided with the increase of enrollments in universities and this panel proposes to investigate these two in relation to each other. The scale of the university has increased in terms of rising numbers of students enrolled. Also, as university has become more accessible to larger numbers of citizens, the importance of higher education as a marker of class has become, relatively, more available.

In the light of these shifts, the question is how the (increasing) importance of the university as a site of emancipation takes on questions of gender norms and practices, as well as forms of sexuality.

On the one hand, universities can be seen as sites of normative structures regarding gender, sexuality, race / ethnicity, class, age and more, shaping normativity from aesthetics to (gendered) harassment on college campuses.

On the other hand, universities have also been the sites for social justice and emancipation, regarding gender and sexuality, by the way of Women’s & Gender studies, LGBT studies and Queer Theory.

This panel seeks to bring together a collection of papers on the role of the neoliberal university in shaping, marking, and creating new expressions and relations of gender, class, and sexuality. In this way, it opens up the discussion to allow for the varied ways that universities implement and allow possibly opposing development of providing spaces for emancipation as well as reproducing normative spaces in terms of gendered, sexualized and classed possibilities.

Papers should seek to elaborate on both theoretical elements and empirical cases (from the Global North and South) and aspects of the role of the university in the 21st Century and its impact on gender, class, and sexuality.

http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/panels/panels/panels/content/folder/the-neoliberal-university-gender-class–sexuali.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-cfp-the-neoliberal-university

Conference Website: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/social-class-conference.html

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Gender and Education

TEACHING GENDER SERIES – CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

Sense Publishers

Series Editor, Patricia Leavy, PhD

The Teaching Gender Series will publish approximately three books annually. We are looking for books that deal centrally with gender and are intended to be used in college classes. Books should be of significant value to the teaching of gender. The series aims to promote social justice perspectives and will be published by Sense Publishers, leaders in educational research.

 

The International Editorial Advisory Board for the Series includes:

Tony E. Adams, Northeastern Illinois University, USA

Paula Banerjee, University of Calcutta, India

Nitza Berkovitch, Ben Gurion University, Israel

Cheryl Dellasega, Penn State University, USA

Máiréad Dunne, University of Sussex, UK

Mary Holmes, Flinders University, Australia

Laurel Richardson, Ohio State University, Emerita, USA

Sophie Tamas, Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada

  

Books on any gender-related topic will be considered; however, we are presently most interested in proposals for books on the following topics (please note we are looking to publish slim volumes and not very large textbooks- approximately 200 printed pages with an estimated 450 words per page when tabulated using Sense’s style guidelines):

  

Introduction to Gender Studies

International Perspectives on Gender

Women, Work & Family

Feminist Pedagogies

Feminist Research Methods or Research Methods for Gender Studies

  

Please send queries or full proposals for monographs or edited volumes to Series Editor, Patricia Leavy at pleavy7@aol.com.

Visit Sense Publishers at: www.sensepublishers.com

  

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

EDUCATING FROM MARX: RACE, GENDER, AND LEARNING – BY SARA CARPENTER AND SHAHRZAD MOJAB

Series: Marxism and Education

Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN-10: 0230115810

ISBN-13: 978-0230115811

270 pages; hardback

 

This text is an articulation of a renewed Marxist-feminist framework for adult education. In recent years adult educators have been working to develop an important body of literature on neo-liberalism, capitalism, and imperialism. Many of these analyses draw on various strands of Marxist theorizing. With the exception of Jane Thompson’s work as an early socialist feminist, a Marxist-Feminist framework has yet to be articulated for adult education. This text combines original empirical studies with literature review from critical adult education and feminist theory to examine the sites, theories, and practices of adult education from a Marxist-Feminist perspective.  

Contents:

PART I: MARXIST-FEMINISTS ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE

Introduction: A Specter Haunts Adult Education: Crafting a Marxist-Feminist Framework for Adult Education & Learning; Sara Carpenter & Shahrzad Mojab

Ideology, Science, and Social Relations: A Reinterpretation of Marx’s Epistemology; Dorothy E. Smith

Building from Marx: Reflections on ‘Race’, Gender, and Class; Himani Bannerji

PART II: MARXIST-FEMINIST PRAXIS

Examining the Social Relations of Learning Citizenship: Citizenship and Ideology in Adult Education; Sara Carpenter

Learning to Mentor Young People: A Saintly Vocation or an Alienating Experience?; Helen Colley

Exploring the Social Relations of Class Struggle in the OntarioMinimum Wage Campaign; Sheila Wilmot

The Ideological Construction of ‘Canadian Work Experience’: Adult Education and the Reproduction of Labor and Difference; Bonnie Slade

PART III: MARXIST-FEMINISM, IMPERIALISM, AND CULTURE

Adult Education in/and Imperialism; Shahrzad Mojab

Materiality and Memory: A Marxist-Feminist Perspective on the ‘Cultural Turn’ in Adult Education; Tara Silver 

Epilogue: Living Revolution, Learning Revolution, Teaching Revolution; Shahrzad Mojab & Sara Carpenter

 

SHAHRZAD MOJAB Professor in the Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Canada.
SARA CARPENTER is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Adult Education & Counselling Psychology at theUniversity ofToronto’s OISE,Canada.

“Congratulations to the editors and other outstanding contributors to this exemplary text. The collaborative project that underpinned and drove the production of this work is clearly evident throughout: therefore, in one text we find the critically analytical/theoretical coherence one expects from a single-authored text with the added benefit of that coherence being brought to bear on a multiplicity of contexts that only a multiple-authored text can provide. An amazing contribution to critical revolutionary praxis inspired and informed by Marx” — Paula Allman, author of Critical Education Against Global Capitalism: Karl Marx and Revolutionary Critical Education

At Palgrave Macmillan: http://us.macmillan.com/book.aspx?isbn=9780230115811

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333664978&sr=1-1

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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Feminism

DISSIDENT FEMINISMS

Announcing a New Series: Dissident Feminisms

Series Editor: Piya Chatterjee, University of California, Riverside

The University of Illinois Press is pleased to announce a new series, Dissident Feminisms, which seeks new feminist writing that traverses the fault lines of epistemology and power, particularly the relationship between social action, activism and theory. Featuring work by scholar-activists with critical and praxis-oriented methods, this interdisciplinary series seeks to intervene in conversations of critical import in a number of fields. We plan to foster rigorous feminist engagement with the enduring, intractable problems of our time: racisms; genocides; war and occupation; heteronormative, communitarian and state violence; militarism; and struggles for livelihood and basic human rights.

Dissident Feminisms seeks writing that breaks taboos. We will feature feminist analyses that combine radical critique with work towards progressive social change. The series is particularly interested in bridging the gaps between transnational and postcolonial feminist scholars, activists, and organizers and the work of U.S., immigrant, and native women of color. It will create space for radically plural critiques that combine analytic rigor with accessibility. The series will feature lucid and compelling academic monographs, edited collections that bring together a number of voices in focused, critical, and timely dialogue, and other writings that pointedly intervene in these urgent feminist conversations.

Please direct all questions and submissions to:

Larin McLaughlin
Senior Acquisitions Editor
University of Illinois Press
1325 South Oak St.
Champaign, IL 61820-6903
larinmc@uillinois.edu

 

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Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

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Education Crisis

MARXIAN ANALYSIS OF SOCIETY, SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION SIG OF THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (MASSES)
CALL FOR PAPERS

2012 Annual Meeting – Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Friday, April 13 – Tuesday, April 17, 2012
http://www.facebook.com/l/7ba756tNF7qOe9ItKjSdc1iil3A/www.aera.net/

*Why Marxism? Whose Marxism? Let’s Begin from the Beginning.*

*Rethink Class, Race and Gender Inequalities and Education*

The current global momentum is a profound paradox. On one hand, our era has been witnessing huge and dramatic transformations propelled by the biotech movement including genetic and biotechnological discoveries, as well as, the electronic revolution of communications and information both of which have had a huge impact on the way knowledge has been produced and reproduced.

Despite such progress, on the other hand, global societies have been experiencing, among other things, the shocking exacerbation (and in some cases the return) of horrendous social evils, namely, the return of slavery, legitimization of human genocide, new pandemics, the return of high vulnerability to old sicknesses that seemed to have been eradicated and now appear to be linked to new pandemics like HIV/AIDS, and naturalization of war, the domestication of revolting social inequalities (cf. Sousa Santos, 2005), the need of a more predatory capitalism to sustain neoliberal capitalism, the emergence of a new economy propelled by the need to fight terror(ism) (cf. Giroux, 2011).

Despite the fact that we never had a society that produced as much knowledge as today’s society, the fact is such production not only has been incapable of building a fairer and just society, but also as it has just served to increase and multiply social inequality. Such shocking paradoxes bring to the fore the vitality of (neo)Marxist analyses, as the ‘most rigorous, comprehensive critique of capitalism ever to be launched’ (Eagleton, 2011).

The 2012 Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG program asks scholars and educators around the globe, profoundly committed with the struggle for social and cognitive justice, to rethinking not only class, race, and gender inequalities and education, but also if the reinvigoration of the (neo)Marxist analyses and contributions to society and education implies the need to ‘begin from the beginning’ (Zizek, 2009). We asked scholars to critically address questions such as why (neo)Marxism and whose (neo)Marxism is a key to rethink and understand the current global disruption of capitalism and its implications of the daily live of teachers and students.

AERA: http://www.area.net

MASSES Yahoo Group (Marx and Education SIG): http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MarxSIG/  

 

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Education and Capitalism

EDUCATION AND CAPITALISM: STRUGGLES FOR LEARNING AND LIBERATION

EDITED BY JEFF BALE AND SARAH KNOPP

Forthcoming Fall 2011

“This book is a breath of fresh air! The chapters take on central issues in education with a clear vision of what could be. Class, race, language and culture become not just educational ‘problems,’ but tools with which to rethink the future. A stellar addition to books in our field” —Jean Anyon, author of Marx and Education

“At a time when the capitalist class and their corporate allies in the media have waged an all-out assault on teachers, students, and public education, Education and Capitalism responds by speaking truth to power.…Drawing from the lived experiences of the editors and their students, and informed by cutting edge socio-political critique, Education and Capitalism clears the path for a new understanding of the current assault on public schooling and points towards important directions if we are to save it.” —Peter McLaren, author of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of  Revolution 

In the first decade of the twenty-first century, a conservative, bipartisan consensus dominates about what’s wrong with our schools and how to fix them. In each case, those solutions scapegoat teachers, vilify our unions, and promise more private control and market mentality as the answer. In each case, students lose—especially students of color and the children of the working class and the poor.

This book, written by teacher activists, speaks back to that elite consensus. It draws on the ideas and experiences of social justice educators concerned with fighting against racism and for equality, and those of activists oriented on recapturing the radical roots of the labor movement. Informed by a revolutionary vision of pedagogy, schools, and education, it paints a radical critique of education in Corporate America, past and present, and contributes to a vision of alternatives for education andliberation. Inside are essays that trace Marxist theories of education under capitalism; outline the historical educational experiences of emergent bilingual and African American students; recap the history of teachers’ unions; analyze the neoliberal attack on public schools under Obama; critically appraise Paolo Freire’s legacy; and make the historical link between social revolution and struggles for literacy.

With contributions from:
Rose Aguilar
Megan Behrent
Bill Bigelow
Michele Bollinger
John T. Green
Jesse Hagopian
Adrienne Johnstone
Brian Jones
Jessie Muldoon
Gillian Russom
Adam Sanchez
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Elizabeth Terzakis
Dan Trocolli

Sarah Knopp is a public high school teacher inLos Angeles and an activist with United Teachers Los Angeles.

Jeff Bale is assistant professor of second language education at Michigan State University. Their work has appeared in Rethinking Schools, International Socialist Review, and CounterPunch

Available Fall 2011 |Trade paper | $17.00 | 220 pages | ISBN: 9781608461646 | Published by Haymarket Books | http://www.haymarketbooks.org | info@haymarketbooks.org | 773-583-7884

For review or desk copies, contact Sarah Macaraeg, sarah@haymarketbooks.org

Book details at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/52611703/EDUCATION-AND-CAPITALISM-STRUGGLES-FOR-LEARNING-AND-LIBERATION

For more information, visit:
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Education-and-Capitalism

or link to the book’s Facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/educationandcapitalism

***END***

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Blair's Educational Legacy

BLAIR’S EDUCATIONAL LEGACY: THIRTEEN YEARS OF NEW LABOUR

Edited by Anthony Green

Palgrave Macmillan (December 2010)

ISBN: 978-0-230-62176-3, ISBN10: 0-230-62176-7, 5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches, 244 pages

Providing an overview and Marxist assessment of Tony Blair and New Labour’sU.K.education policies, structures, and processes, the contributors in this exciting new collection discuss specific aspects of education policy and practices. This examination is set against the changing political and economic contexts of the British state’s responses to global and neo-liberal pressures.

Central themes include: New Labour and the education market state; New Labour, education, and ideology; and totality and open Marxism. 

Green’s work marks a timely contribution to Marxist analysis and Left critical assessment and is the first such collection addressing New Labour education policy.

Anthony Green is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Foundations and Policy Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London. He co-convenes Marxism and Education Renewing Dialogues (MERD), and is Series Editor for the Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series.

CONTENTS:

Introduction: Anthony Green * All the Wrong Answers: Labour’s Corporate-Centred Education Initiatives–Kevin Farnsworth * The Knowledge-based Economy and the Transformation of Higher Education: Issues concerning enclosing and protecting the intellectual commons–Molly Bellamy * The Professional Imagination: Further Education Professionalism in and beyond a Neo-liberal Context–Denis Gleeson * The Privatisation of Education Phase II: Perspectives on state schools the private sector and ten years of a Labour government–Thakir Hafid * Management and Governance of the School System–Richard Hatcher * City: Academies, Alienation, Economism and Contending Forces for Change–Philip Woods * Curriculum Change in the Blair Years–Terry Wrigley * Education still make you sick under Gordon Brown, Innit?–Martin Allen & Patrick Ainley * Ten Years of Education Policy and ‘Race’ Inequality: Whiteness or Neo-liberal Practice?–Alpesh Maisuria * Gendered Practices in Education–Rosalyn George & John Wadsworth

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Palgrave Macmillan): http://us.macmillan.com/blairseducationallegacy

Palgrave Macmillan Marxism and Education Series: http://www.palgrave.com/products/series.aspx?s=ME

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.co.uk): http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_13?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304672910&sr=1-13

Blair’s Educational Legacy (at Amazon.com): http://www.amazon.com/Blairs-Educational-Legacy-Thirteen-Education/dp/0230621767/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304673063&sr=1-10

‘I Read Some Marx (And I Liked It)’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wyqJ9wxZ9L0 

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Education

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION – VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/rcie/content/pdfs/6/issue6_1.asp

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Volume 6 Number 1 2011   ISSN 1745-4999

SPECIAL ISSUE
Girls and Young Women’s Education and Empowerment in Marginalized Regions of the World
Guest Editors: VILMA SEEBERG & KAREN MONKMAN

Karen Monkman. Introduction. Framing Gender, Education and Empowerment

Halla B. Holmarsdottir, Ingrid Birgitte Møller Ekne & Heidi L. Augestad. The Dialectic between Global Gender Goals and Local Empowerment: girls’ education in Southern Sudan and South Africa

Joan DeJaeghere & Soo Kyoung Lee. What Matters for Marginalized Girls and Boys in Bangladesh: a capabilities approach for understanding educational well-being and empowerment

Vilma Seeberg. Schooling, Jobbing, Marrying: what’s a girl to do to make life better? Empowerment Capabilities of Girls at the Margins of Globalization in China

Kristen J. Molyneaux. Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education Policy and its Effect on ‘Empowered’ Women: how reduced income and moonlighting activities differentially impact male and female teachers

Sofie Haug Changezi & Heidi Biseth. Education of Hazara Girls in a Diaspora: education as empowerment and an agent of change

Payal P. Shah. Girls’ Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: perspectives from rural India

Supriya Baily. Speaking Up: contextualizing women’s voices and gatekeepers’ reactions in promoting women’s empowerment in rural India

Mary Ann Maslak. Education, Employment and Empowerment: the case of a young woman in northwestern China

Joshua A. Muskin, Abdelhak Kamime & Abdellah Adlaoui. Empowered to Empower: a civil society-government partnership to increase girls’ junior secondary school outcomes in Morocco

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS: For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor David Phillips (david.phillips@education.ox.ac.uk). Full details concerning the submission of articles can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/RCIE/04.html

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeRCIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge your Librarian to take out a subscription so that we can provide unrestricted access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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Agency

AGENCY IN A CHANGING EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT

Just published at: http://www.wwwords.eu/eerj/content/pdfs/9/issue9_2.asp

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL
Volume 9 Number 2, 2010   ISSN 1474-9041

ECER KEYNOTES – VIENNA 2009

Stephen J. Ball. New Voices, New Knowledges and the New Politics of Education Research: the gathering of a perfect storm?

Roland Reichenbach. Two Solitudes: educational research and the pedagogical realm

Herbert Altrichter. Theory and Evidence on Governance: conceptual and empirical strategies of research on governance in education

SPECIAL ISSUE
AGENCY IN A CHANGING EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT: Negotiations, Collective Actions and Resistance
Guest Editors: ANNE-LISE ARNESEN, ELINA LAHELMA, LISBETH LUNDAHL & ELISABET ÖHRN

Anne-Lise Arnesen, Elina Lahelma, Lisbeth Lundahl & Elisabet Öhrn. Introduction. Agency in a Changing Educational Context: negotiations, collective actions and resistance

AGENCY

Kari Berg. Negotiating Identity: conflicts between the agency of the student and the official diagnosis of social workers and teachers

Jukka Lehtonen. Gendered Post-Compulsory Educational Choices of Non-Heterosexual Youth

Joakim Lindgren & Lisbeth Lundahl. Mobilities of Youth: social and spatial trajectories in a segregated Sweden

TEACHERS’ AND STUDENTS’ COLLECTIVE ACTIONS, NEGOTIATION AND RESISTANCE

Maria Rönnlund. Student Participation in Activities with Influential Outcomes: issues of gender, individuality and collective thinking in Swedish secondary schools

Ulpukka Isopahkala-Bouret. Vocational Teachers between Educational Institutions and Workplaces

Marianne Dovemark. Teachers’ Collective Actions, Alliances and Resistance within Neo-liberal Ideas of Education: the example of the Individual Programme

Carina Hjelmér, Sirpa Lappalainen & Per-Åke Rosvall. Time, Space and Young People’s Agency in Vocational Upper Secondary Education: a cross-cultural perspective

CHANGING CONTEXTS OF AGENCY

Ann-Sofie Holm. Gender Pattern and Student Agency: secondary school students’ perceptions over time

Katariina Hakala. Discourses on Inclusion, Citizenship and Categorizations of ‘Special’ in Education Policy: the case of negotiating change in the governing of vocational special needs education in Finland

Tove Steen-Olsen & Astrid Grude Eikseth. The Power of Time: teachers’ working day – negotiating autonomy and control

REVIEW ESSAY

Jörg Dinkelaker. Learning in the Knowledge Society and the Issue of Fundamental Change in Education: a comparative review

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2010 volume (this includes full access to ALL back numbers) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.eu/subscribeEERJ.asp

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Martin Lawn (m.lawn@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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William Godwin

ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

For a book entitled

Anarchist Pedagogies

Editor: Robert Haworth PhD

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Overview:

Anarchist movements have a long history of resisting traditional schooling and authoritative pedagogical practices, while at the same time, attempting to construct transformative educative processes. Examples include Francisco Ferrer’s (1913) work entitled, Origins of the Modern School and the creation of the Escuela Moderna schools in Spain, the Modernist Schools in the United States (Emma Goldman, Voltaraine de Cleyre, Alex Berkman and others) during the early 20th century as well as contemporary anarchists who are experimenting in participatory informal learning spaces. These examples are important to acknowledge within radical notions of teaching and learning being that they are experiences that enable activists and scholars to critically re-imagine education and build theories on “how” and “where” individuals experiment in constructing knowledge through differing learning spaces (Coté, Day & Peuter, 2007; de Leon, 2008, Malott, forthcoming).

Moreover, as totalizing efforts of the nation-state continue to develop standardized curriculum, efficiency models and data driven outcomes, anarchist pedagogies attempt to construct ongoing collective learning environments that can be described as ‘disciplined improvisation’ or ‘spontaneous’ in nature (Goldman, 1969; Haworth, forthcoming; Sawyer, 2003; Ward, 1972). Furthermore, these informal learning spaces create new ways of exposing illegitimate corporate and state power, as well as participating in the ‘coming communities’ (Day, 2007).

This edited book calls on international scholars (15 single authored or collectively authored chapters) in anarchist studies to critically reflect on historical and contemporary experimentations in anarchist pedagogies. Scholarly efforts will focus on what we have learned from past anarchist experiences and current transformative learning environments — where individuals are engaged in collective, participatory, voluntary and mutual efforts that contest global capitalist structures.

The edited collection responds to the need to reflect on anarchist pedagogies and will highlight three major themes. Authors in the first section will be encouraged to focus on historical discussions surrounding anarchism and education. The authors will give introspective critiques of historical practices, including theories of teaching and learning and alternatives to compulsory public schools. Authors in the second section will construct philosophical and theoretical frameworks evolving from contemporary anarchists, particularly through individuals participating in cooperatives, independent media collectives, infoshops, political zines, open source projects, DIY, direct action networks and other autonomous and cultural spaces.

Continued efforts to construct theoretical and philosophical discussions surrounding anarchism have also provided opportunities to build affinities and tensions with frameworks outside of anarchist writings (Cohn, 2007). The third section will encompass anarchist theories of teaching and learning. Authors will be asked to construct linkages and apprehensions to theories surrounding critical pedagogies and critical theory, autonomous Marxism, postmodernity and poststruturalism.

Proposed sections:

Forward:

Zack de la Rocha

1) Introduction

2) Section 1: Anarchism & Education: Historical experimentations

a. Anarchist perspectives on education

b. Modern Schools; Spain and the United States

c. Pedagogical practices: teacher/student relationship

d. Issues of the state and compulsory education

e. Connection and/or tensions between progressive education and social reconstruction

f. What have we learned?

3) Section 2: Anarchist Pedagogies in the “here and now”

a. Contesting power through multiple fronts: Movements against neoliberalism and learning through collective processes: Infoshops, cooperatives, autonomous spaces, zines, DIY

b. Teaching and learning in non-hierarchical, mutual and voluntary spaces — issues surrounding race, class, gender, LGBT

c. Technology: Issues surrounding the use of technology: open source, listservs, blogs & discussion boards

4) Section 3: Anarchism: Theoretical Frameworks on Teaching & Learning

a. Affinities: Anarchism & Critical pedagogies. Relationship to Postmodernism and Poststructuralism-Postanarchism

b. Informal learning spaces

c. De-schooling

d. Anarchism & the role of the university

e. Pedagogical practices

Audience:

Anarchist Pedagogies will draw upon and make connection to contemporary anarchist studies literature, particularly in education. The book will be important for scholars in anarchist studies, critical pedagogy, as well as undergraduate students and activists who are interested in building philosophical, theoretical, historical and contemporary discussions and imaginations beyond traditional forms of education.

Timeframe:

1) Proposals due by July 20th, 2010

2) Proposal confirmations: August 20th, 2010

3) Chapter drafts due by October 1st, 2010

4) Editor

5) Review of drafts: November, 2010

Editor will produce a comprehensive introductory and single authored chapter in one of the three sections. The forward will be written by an activist/scholar. Final editing and approval of the formatted version will be submitted December 30th, 2010. Publishing date will be set for early fall, 2011.

Contributors:

Process for submitting proposals:

Interested scholars, researchers, educators, activists and others should send to the editor, by July 20th, 2010, the following:

1) Names, positions, mailing addresses, fax and phone numbers, and email addresses of authors;

2) Title of proposed chapter;

3) Description, of no more than 300 words, of chapter, including type of research, approach, context, connection to the book, and other pertinent information;

4) Biographies of authors of no more than 200 words;

Biography of editor:

Robert Haworth is an Associate Professor in Multicultural Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He currently serves as the director for the Research Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses surrounding diversity and education, globalization and neoliberalism. He has published multiple peer reviewed book chapters and presented internationally on anarchism and informal learning spaces, as well as critical social studies education. He co-founded Regeneration TV, along with other research collectives that are directly involved in contesting neoliberal policies at the university level. This is Robert Haworth’s first edited book.

Robert Haworth PhD—Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, haworth.robe@uwlax.edu, 608.385.0891

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Gender and Education

GENDER AND EDUCATION ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE – BARCELONA 2010

Gender and Education Association Interim Conference 2010: Gender and Education. Diversity of Voices

8 – 9 April 2010,
Universitat de Barcelona
Edifici Històric de la Universitat de Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 585. 08007

Judith Butler

Capitolina Diaz

Lídia Puigvert

Myria Vassiliadou

Gaby Weiner

The conference will draw together outstanding international speakers and researchers as well as activists engaged in gender and education. We encourage submissions that address conceptual, methodological, and practical challenges and opportunities in research and practice, from a diversity of voices on gender and education. The aims of the conference are:

* To review the cutting edge feminist and gender theory research and learn current research trends

* To provide an environment for participants to dialog and share their concerns and claims on gender and education issues

* To create a learning space to network and strengthen collaborations

The Interim Conference 2010: Gender and Education. Diversity of Voices is organised by SAFO CREA Women’s group (CREA-UB is the Centre of research in Theories and Practices that overcome Inequalities at the University of Barcelona) with the support of the Gender and Education Association.

Our hope is that the submissions for the 2010 Interim Conference will stimulate new conversations and collaborations that broaden our understandings of gender and education, making it possible to use that knowledge to create learning opportunities for all.

Deadline for abstracts – 14th February
Information on the conference is posted on the website at: http://www.pcb.ub.es/crea/  https://exchange.lancs.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.pcb.ub.es/crea/  

Email enquiries to: gea@ub.edu

Telephone: +34 93 403 50 99

Complete details:

Dates: April  8- 9, 2010

Place: Edifici Històric de la Universitat de Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 585. 08007

Map: http://www.ub.edu/ubicat/  

https://exchange.lancs.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.ub.edu/ubicat/  

Tourist information and accommodation: http://www.barcelonaturismo.com  https://exchange.lancs.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.barcelonaturismo.com/

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