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Punk

INTERFACE – VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1 (MAY 2011)

Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Interface: http://interfacejournal.net

Volume three, issue one (May 2011): Repression and social movements Issue editors: Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Lesley Wood http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue one of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Repression and social movements”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.

This issue of Interface includes 296 pages with 20 pieces in English and Portuguese, by authors writing from / about Angola, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Germany, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, South Africa, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

Cristina Flesher Fominaya and Lesley Wood, Editorial: repression  and social movements
Theme-related articles:

Peter Ullrich and Gina Rosa Wollinger, A surveillance studies perspective on protest policing: the case of video surveillance of demonstrations inGermany

Liz Thompson and Ben Rosenzweig, Public policy is class war pursued by other means: struggle and restructuring in international education economy

Kristian Williams, Counter-insurgency and community policing

Fernanda Maria Vieira and J. Flávio Ferreira, “Não somos chilenos, somos mapuches!”: as vozes do passado no presente da luta mapuche por seu território

Roy Krøvel, From indios to indígenas: guerrilla perspectives on indigenous peoples and repression in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua Action / practice notes and event analysis from:
    • Musab Younis, British tuition fee protest, November 9, 2010
    • Dino Jimbi, Campanha “Não partam a minha casa”
    • Mac Scott, G20 mobilizing in Toronto and community organizing: opportunities created and lessons learned
    • Aileen O’Carroll, Alessio Lunghi, Laurence Cox, “I’m in the news today, oh boy”: smear tactics and media bullying

Other articles:

Eurig Scandrett and Suroopa Mukherjee, Globalisation and abstraction in theBhopalsurvivors’ movement

George Sranko, Collaborative governance and a strategic approach to facilitating change: the South East Queensland Forest Agreement and the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement

John Agbonifo, Territorialising Niger Delta conflicts: place and contentious mobilisation
 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:
    • Laurence Davis and Ruth Kinna, Anarchism and utopianism
    • Fiona Dukelow and Orla O’Donovan, Mobilising classics: reading radical writing in Ireland
    • David Graeber, Direct action: an ethnography
    • Nathalie Hyde-Clarke, The citizen in communication: re-visiting traditional, new and community media practices in South Africa
    • Gabriel Kuhn, Sober living for the revolution: hardcore punk, Straight Edge, and radical politics
    • Alf Gunvald Nilsen, Dispossession and resistance in India: the river and the rage

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 1 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The season of revolution: the Arab spring” (submissions deadline November 1 2011).

We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://www.interfacejournal.net/2011/05/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-1-the-season-of-revolution-the-arab-spring/

Volume 3, issue 2 on “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement” is due to be published in November 2011. A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2, on “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work and workers” will shortly be published (deadline May 1 2012 for publication in November 2012).

Interface is always open to new collaborators. We need activists and academics who can referee articles in Chinese, Indonesian and Russian in particular, and translators to help with our multilingual project more generally. We are also looking for people willing to help set up regional groups in East Asia and Central Asia. We are also looking for collaborators for our existing groups, particularly but not only the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, and Oceania / SE Asian groups. More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net

Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested.

 

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Pirates Only

PIRATES AND PIRACY – MATERIAL REALITIES AND CULTURAL MYTHS

Editorial Notes: Pirates and Piracy – Material Realities and Cultural Myths

By Andrew Opitz

This special issue of darkmatter sets out to examine the complicated and often incongruous cultural meanings assigned to pirates and piracy in the twenty-first century. Debates about piracy have long featured certain telling contradictions. At different times, pirates have been seen as both violent monsters and colorful folk heroes. They have been cast by historians and cultural critics as both capitalist marauders and militant workers fighting for a restoration of the commons. How can we account for these seemingly incompatible visions? Of course, it is important to observe that pirates were hardly uniform in their social and political orientations. Some were greedy opportunists. Some were desperate sailors and slaves driven to mutiny. Others were somewhere in-between. We should also recognize that our understanding of piracy is powerfully shaped by our economic interests and our relationship with the law. The propertied targets of piratical theft are quick to view pirates as criminal actors outside the bounds of civilized behaviour, but the dispossessed are inclined to take a more nuanced approach that admires the defiance of the pirates at the same time as it fears their violence.

It is also important to note that pirates now have a symbolic importance that transcends the basic material conditions behind their banditry. Our enduring cultural fascination with pirates is tied to their status as celebrated figures of rebellion and nonconformity in popular novels and films. Although the actual history of maritime robbery is sordid and contradictory, the pirate has become a compelling symbol of freedom: freedom from oppressive work routines; freedom from polite behaviour; freedom from institutional controls; freedom from restrictive property laws; freedom from unjust social conventions surrounding race and gender roles. We now apply the pirate label to an assortment of activities – from the formation of transgressive sexual identities to the technology-assisted defiance of copyright law – that have little or nothing to do with the sea or those who “go down to it in ships.” The articles assembled in this special issue take a broad approach to the study of pirates and piracy, examining diverse subjects ranging from the working-class politics of transatlantic piracy in the eighteenth century to the actions of Nigerian media pirates in the twenty-first century and recent debates about Somali pirates within East African immigrant communities in North America.

The authors who contributed to this special issue of darkmatter have approached the cultural politics of pirates and piracy from different angles. They are historians, literary critics, legal scholars and media/cultural theorists. However, their scholarship is linked by the shared understanding that modern piracy, like the modern world itself, is inextricably bound to the history of colonial and neo-colonial relations of production and the legacy of racial and class conflict that they produced – a history that forged the global capitalist order that continues to shape our everyday relationships with other people. 

Pirates are often dismissed in the media as exotic anachronisms – colorful characters out of step with present realities. But the forces that produced, and continue to produce pirates – global shipping, the extraction of resources from colonial and neocolonial holdings, the mobilization and control of labor in the service of investment capital – still drive our world today. Studying pirates and their ongoing cultural resonance is hardly a frivolous activity. It is necessary for a true understanding of the socially uneven, violent and unstable world in which we live – a world that is still very much at sea.

Andrew Opitz
Guest Editor

Editorial Notes: Pirates and Piracy – Material Realities and Cultural Myths by Andrew Opitz • 20 Dec 09

Revolution Bootlegged: Pirate Resistance in Nigeria’s Broken Infrastructure by Jason Crawford • 20 Dec 09

Digital Pirates and the Enclosure of the Intellect by Irmak Ertuna • 20 Dec 09

Where’s the Booty?: The Stakes of Textual and Economic Piracy as Seen Through the Work of Kathy Acker by Paige Sweet • 20 Dec 09

Life Under the Jolly Roger: Reflections on Golden Age Piracy – Interview with Gabriel Kuhn by Nora Räthzel • 20 Dec 09

Hostis humani generis. History of a multi-faceted word by Salvatore Poier • 20 Dec 09

Atlantic Orientalism: How Language in Jefferson’s America Defeated the Barbary Pirates by Angela Sutton • 20 Dec 09

Voyage of the Black Joke: Piracy and Gallows Humor in an Era of Primitive Accumulation by Andrew Opitz • 20 Dec 09

The Pirate and the Colonial Project: Kanhoji Angria by Derek L. Elliott • 20 Dec 09

Unravelling Narratives of Piracy: Discourses of Somali Pirates by Muna Ali and Zahra Murad • 20 Dec 09

‘Liberty or Life!’: The Convict Pirates of the Wellington by Erin Ihde • 20 Dec 09

See: http://www.darkmatter101.org/site/category/journal/issues/5-pirates-and-piracy/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com