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Slavoj Zizek

ZIZEK IN NEW YORK CITY

BESTSELLING TITLE: LIVING IN THE END TIMES

By SLAVOJ ZIZEK

Published 21 April 2010

**MAJOR NYC EVENT***

Monday 8 November, 7pm, The Great Hall at Cooper Union, 7 East 7th Street, New York

Slavoj Zizek will be making a major New York City appearance at Cooper Union to discuss his most recent book Living in End Times, in which he reveals the signs of the coming apocalypse and identifies the terminal crisis of global capitalism.

For more information and to buy tickets go to http://livingintheendtimes-hm.eventbrite.com

Tickets: $10 student price / $20 regular price. Booking is essential.
Regular admission includes a FREE copy of Living in the End Times.
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“Zizek leaves no social or cultural phenomenon untheorized, and is master of the counterintuitive observation.” New Yorker.

“A great provocateur… Zizek writes with passion and an aphoristic energy that is spellbinding.” Los Angeles Times
“The most dangerous philosopher in the West.” New Republic
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Zizek analyzes the end of the world at the hands of the “four riders of the apocalypse.”

There should no longer be any doubt: global capitalism is fast approaching its terminal crisis. Slavoj Zizek has identified the four horsemen of this coming apocalypse: the worldwide ecological crisis; imbalances within the economic system; the biogenetic revolution; and exploding social divisions and ruptures. But, he asks, if the end of capitalism seems to many like the end of the world, how is it possible for Western society to face up to the end times? In a major new analysis of our global situation, Slavoj Zizek argues that our collective responses to economic Armageddon correspond to the stages of grief: ideological denial, explosions of anger and attempts at bargaining, followed by depression and withdrawal.

After passing through this zero-point, we can begin to perceive the crisis as a chance for a new beginning. Or, as Mao Zedong put it, “There is great disorder under heaven, the situation is excellent.” Slavoj Zizek shows the cultural and political forms of these stages of ideological avoidance and political protest, from New Age obscurantism to violent religious fundamentalism. Concluding with a compelling argument for the return of a Marxian critique of political economy, Zizek also divines the wellsprings of a potentially communist culture—from literary utopias like Kafka’s community of mice to the collective of freak outcasts in the TV series Heroes.
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Slavoj Zizek is today’s most controversial public intellectual. His work traverses the fields of philosophy, psychoanalysis, theology, history and political theory, taking in film, popular culture, and literature to provide acute analyses of the complexities of contemporary ideology as well as a serious and sophisticated philosophy. The author of over 30 books, Slavoj Zizek’s provocative prose has challenged a generation of activists and intellectuals. His latest book is Living in the End Times.

Called the “Elvis of cultural theory” and the “greatest intellectual high since anti-Oedipus” Zizek’s work has appeared in the The New York Times, the New Yorker and The Guardian, and he has appeared in Astra Taylor’s feature length films Zizek! and Examined Life. He is a Professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
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ISBN: 978 1 84467 598 2 / $29.95 / 432 pages
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For more information and to buy: http://livingintheendtimes-hm.eventbrite.com
 
END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Fanaticism

FANATICISM

On the Uses of an Idea

By ALBERTO TOSCANO

Published 7h June 2010

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EVENTS:

Thursday 3 June, 1pm at the RSA, London: A special introduction to Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea. For more information and book your free place: http://www.thersa.org/events/our-events/fanaticism-on-the-uses-of-an-idea

Friday 2 July, 2-3.30pm at the Marxism 2010 Festival in London, Room 3E at ULU, 2-3.30. For more information and to book:  https://www.marxismfestival.org.uk/2010/bookonline.html

Thursday 8 July, 6.45pm: Launch talk at the ICA. Further details to be announced here: http://www.ica.org.uk/7945/Talks/Talks-listings.html

Monday 11 October, 6.30 -8.00pm at the LSE, Wolfson theatre as part of the Forum for European Philosophy talks. Further details to be announced here:http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/forumForEuropeanPhilosophy/events/Default.htm

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“A tour de force in every sense – Toscano wipes the smug smiles off the self-righteous faces of the New Philosophers.” Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums

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Fanaticism is usually seen as a deviant or extreme variant of an already irrational set of religious beliefs. Drawing a straight line from the Peasant Wars to Bolshevism, this view of fanaticism is today invoked by the West in order to demonize and psychologize any non-liberal politics. Alberto Toscano’s compelling counter-history explores the critical role fanaticism played in forming modern politics and the liberal state, and undermines the idea that liberalism and fanaticism are irrevocably opposed. 

Tracing its development from the traumatic Peasants’ War of early sixteenth-century Germany, to contemporary Islamism, Toscano tears apart the sterile opposition of “reasonableness” and fanaticism. Instead, in a radical new interpretation, he places the fanatic at the very heart of politics, arguing that historical and revolutionary transformations require a new understanding of its role. Showing how fanaticism results from the failure to formulate an adequate emancipatory politics, this illuminating history sheds new light on an idea that continues to dominate debates about faith and secularism.

The ‘fanatic’ is the figure that we are all scared of – whether it’s the Islamic fundamentalist primed for a suicide bombing or the Christian anti-abortionist planning to murder a doctor. The fanatic is a whirl of contradictions: at once cold-blooded and insanely passionate, opportunistic but principled, backward and yet technologically sophisticated, murderous and prepared to risk everything to human rights. He or she is driven by abstract principles, whether religious or secular, that threaten the very basis of a pragmatic liberal democracy. But are these oppositions really the way to understand the conflict between religion and state, terror and democracy?

In this tour de force examination of political and philosophical rhetoric through the ages, Alberto Toscano examines the use of the term ‘fanatic’. Following its use by Martin Luther in the Reformation, the rationalists in the Enlightenment, and liberals in the Cold War and the present day, he finds our understanding of it dictated by the prejudices of the day.

Toscano argues that there is an unsettling intimacy between political behaviour regarded as fanatical, and rational, emancipatory politics: supposedly liberal political projects are also marked by fanaticism. Moreover, while a liberal would claim that passion and abstract principles (such as universal rights) are the jurisdiction of the fanatic and have no place in rational politics, we should seek to reclaim a place for these supposedly negative terms at the heart of contemporary politics. For example, finding that nineteenth century slavers called abolitionists fanatics for their ‘mad’ adherence to the Rights of Man, he asks us to reconsider who we regard as a fanatic.

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ALBERTO TOSCANO is a lecturer in sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Theatre of Production, translator of Alain Badiou’s The Century and Logics of Worlds and co-editor of, among others, Alain Badiou’s Theoretical Writings and Antonio Negri’s Political Descartes. He has published numerous articles on contemporary philosophy, politics and social theory, and is an editor of Historical Materialism.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 424 4 / $26.95 / £16.99 / CAN$33.50 / 304 pages

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/tuvwxyz/tuv-titles/toscano_alberto_fanaticism.shtml

To buy the book in the UK:

http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844674244/Fanaticism

or

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fanaticism-Uses-Idea-Alberto-Toscano/dp/184467424X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273744261&sr=8-1

To buy the book in the US:

http://www.amazon.com/Fanaticism-Uses-Idea-Alberto-Toscano/dp/184467424X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273744586&sr=1-1

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Visit Verso’s new blog for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers. http://versouk.wordpress.com/

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Global Power

10th ESSEX CONFERENCE IN CRITICAL POLITICAL THEORY

THEORY IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL CHALLENGES: CAPITALISM & ECOLOGY, COMMUNITY & CITIZENSHIP

Call for Papers
Dates: 16-18 June 2010
Location: University of Essex, Colchester, UK
Call for Papers Deadline: 30 April 2010
Website: http://www.essex.ac.uk/idaworld/10th_Essex_Conference_in_Critical_Political_Theory.html
All Inquiries to: polcon@essex.ac.uk

Keynote Speakers
ROMAND Coles is Professor of Community, Culture & Environment at Northern Arizona University.
DIANA Coole is Professor of Political & Social Theory at Birkbeck, University of London.
STEPHEN K. White is James Hart Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia.

Other Confirmed Speakers Include:

JANE Bennett, The Johns Hopkins University (USA)
WILLIAM E. Connolly, The Johns Hopkins University (USA)
ERNESTO Laclau is Emeritus Professor of Political Theory at the University of Essex.
FRANCISO Panizza, London School of Economics and Political Science (UK)

Organizing Committee at the University of Essex
JASON Glynos, Department of Government, University of Essex
DAVID Howarth, Centre for Theoretical Studies, University of Essex
ALETTA J. Norval, Centre for Theoretical Studies, University of Essex
JONATHAN Dean, Department of Government, University of Essex
KHAIRIL Ahmad, PhD Candidate, Department of Government, University of Essex
GRAHAM Walker, PhD Candidate, Department of Government, University of Essex

Methodology Workshops Organizing Committee
GRAHAM Walker, PhD Candidate, Department of Government, University of Essex

The Conference Theme: Theory in the Face of Global Challenges: Capitalism & Ecology, Community & Citizenship

FEW doubt, today, that we face a series of connected global challenges: the dangers of climate change and environmental degradation; a crisis of international finance and global capitalism; an ever-increasing logic of minoritization, which threatens to fragment communities and societies; greater social and economic inequalities, both nationally and globally; the intensification of various forms of religious belief, including fundamentalism, alongside a growing secularization of communities and societies; and a palpable disillusionment with politics and politicians.

THEORISTS and scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and the natural sciences also face new challenges: insistent demands to show the ‘relevance’ of their research for the ‘real world’; diminishing resources and institutional support; a growing marginalization from mainstream and corporately subsidized research. Universities and colleges are being compelled to show that their research has a ‘direct impact’ on the economy, public policy, or society in order to secure funding and research grants.

‘THEORY in the Face of Global Challenges: Capitalism & Ecology, Community & Citizenship’ takes up the challenge of rethinking different aspects of global capitalism, religion, the place of minorities, and the environment. It will also problematize and explore the role of theory in the academy and in relation to the pressing issues we confront.

HOW do we problematize and critically explain these new phenomena? What are the limits and potentials of contemporary political and ethical theory in addressing these new issues? What is the relationship between community, citizenship, and democracy? What kind of ethos needs to be cultivated in the face of these new challenges, and how can it be brought about? Must ecology be sacrificed on the altar of rebuilding the global capitalist system, or is an eco-egalitarian alternative possible? In what ways can various fundamentalisms be challenged and engaged with in the name of a democratic politics that is not itself fundamentalist in character? What is the relationship between cultural theory, radical materialism and various sorts of naturalism? What are the prospects and limits of pluralizing pluralism? Ought we to restrict agency to humans, or does it extend to the material and non-human world more generally? What is the relationship between nature and culture? How can cultural theory respond to recent developments in science? How do these broad sets of issues and questions get addressed in specific contexts and policy arenas? And what theoretical languages and methods are best able to respond to these changes and trends?

THESE are just some of the tasks of critical political theory today. Our invited speakers shall deliver keynote addresses to the conference that will shape the discussions with their distinctive voices and perspectives. Each of the speakers will address one or more of the themes announced in the title.

ROMAND Coles is Professor and Director of the Programme in Community, Culture & Environment at Northern Arizona University. He works at the intersections between radical democratic theory, continental philosophy, and grassroots democratic activism. During his two decades at Duke University he co-founded and co-directed an interdisciplinary project called Dialogical Ethics and Critical Cosmopolitanism, as well as The Third Reconstruction Institute, which cultivated collaborations between scholars and grassroots organizers across the South-Eastern United States. He currently directs the Programme for Community, Culture, and Environment at Northern Arizona University where he writes, teaches and organizes politically on issues pertaining to building grassroots democracy in schools, developing a green economy, crafting public spaces, immigration rights, urban agriculture, and the engaged pedagogy movement in higher education. His writings include: Self/Power/Other: Political Theory and Dialogical Ethics; Rethinking Generosity: Critical Theory and the Politics of Caritas; Beyond Gated Politics: Reflections Toward the Possibility of Democracy; and (with Stanley Hauerwas) Christianity, Democracy, and the Radical Ordinary: Conversations Between a Radical Democrat and a Christian. Romand’s address will explore possibilities for radical democratic transformation toward a green political economy, focusing on vital micro-relational dynamics among humans and the nonhuman that nurture revolutionary enthusiasms, hopeful visions of possibility, and networks of political power necessary for constructing alternatives to ecocidal global capitalism. His discussion will make connections between grassroots community organizing initiatives in which he is involved, theories of mimesis and mirror neurons, and broadening experiments in alternative political economy.

DIANA Coole is Professor of Political and Social Theory at Birkbeck, University of London. Her many books and articles include Women in Political Theory: From Ancient Misogyny to Contemporary Feminism, 2nd Edition (Hemel Hempstead, Harvester-Wheatsheaf & Colorado, Lynne Rienner, 1993); Negativity and Politics: Dionysus and Dialectics from Kant to Poststructuralism (London & New York, Routledge, 2000); Merleau-Ponty and Modern Politics after Anti-Humanism (Rowman and Littlefield, 2007); Materialism and Subjectivity (Duke University Press, 2007). Her address will focus on the discursive and ethical framing of question the population question for developed countries. Her concerns thus engage the intersection between capitalism and the environment, whilst raising significant controversies about immigration, community and new forms of citizenship. Drawing on her extensive knowledge of modern political and social theory, and contemporary continental political philosophy, she will also explore the role of theory and theorists in addressing these issues and their policy implications.

STEPHEN K. White is James Hart Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. His books include The Recent Work of Jurgen Habermas (Cambridge University Press, 1988) and Political Theory and Postmodernism (Cambridge University Press, 1991); Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics and Aesthetics (Sage, 1994). He has also edited volumes entitled Lifeworld and Politics: Between Modernity and Postmodernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 1989) and the Cambridge Companion to Habermas (Cambridge University Press, 1995). His contribution to the forthcoming conference arises from his most recent book – The Ethos of a Late-Modern Citizen – where he contends that the global challenges facing Western democracies require a systematic re-examination and re-articulation of the role of citizens and citizenship. His approach does not deny, in the name of tradition, the force of what is new, nor does he imagine that we can adequately confront change by simply rejecting the traditions of modern Western political thought. Instead, he offers an incisive interpretation of our late-modern ethical-political condition and explains how a distinctive “ethos” or spirit of citizenship might constitute part of an exemplary response. This ethos requires reworking basic figures of the modern political imagination, including our conception of the self, citizenship, and democratic politics.

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THE TENTH CONFERENCE IN CRITICAL POLITICAL THEORY at the University of Essex provides a space to address and engage with these issues. The conference has achieved a renowned reputation for the quality of the papers presented and the large number of international participants. Previous guest speakers have included Bill Connolly, Michael Hardt, Wendy Brown, Judith Squires, Quentin Skinner, Joan Copjec, James Tully, Jane Bennett, Fred Dallmayr, Bonnie Honig, David Owen, David Campbell, Simon Critchley, Ernesto Laclau, and Chantal Mouffe, amongst others. This year the conference will be hosted by the IDAWorld, Centre for Theoretical Studies, and the Department of Government at the University of Essex.

THE conference provides an important opportunity to engage with the contemporary challenges and possibilities of social and political theory and to exchange views on ongoing research. We welcome papers from all scholars, including postdoctoral researchers, postgraduates and early career scholars from a wide variety of backgrounds in the field of social and political theory. But as is customary with the Essex conference, the themes are in part shaped by the thought and writings of our invited guests, and this year is no exception. We are delighted to host Professors Romand Coles, Diana Coole, Ernesto Laclau & Stephen White.

Broad Themes Include
* Rethinking Community and Citizenship
* Critical Political Economy
* Discourse & the Media
* Politics of Immanence and Transcendence
* Ecology and Capitalism
* Politics and Technology
* Latin American Politics
* Universalism and Particularism
* Democracy and Representation
* Capitalism, Multiculturalism, Globalization
* Identity Politics and Mobilization
* Subjectivity and Psychoanalysis
* Religion, Faith and Pluralism
* Discourse and Affect
* Fundamentalisms
* New Ecologies
* Philosophies of Nature
* Discourse, Governance & Public Policy
* Culture and Political Economy
* The Politics of Space, Time and Territoriality
* Reworking Identity/Difference

Proposals for Papers, Panels and Roundtables
The conference organizers welcome proposals for individual papers; full panels (with papers); and roundtables (focused on discussion of a common theme rather than the formal presentation of papers). Paper, panel, and roundtable proposals (short abstracts) should be sent to polcon@essex.ac.uk no later than 30th April, 2010. Inquiries may also be sent to that address. Decisions on proposals will be made on a rolling basis. Inquiries may also be sent to that address. Final papers will be posted on the conference website.
Methodology Workshops

Some of the sessions will be devoted to methodological workshops. The 90-minute workshop sessions feature specialists in different aspects of critical and poststructuralist political analysis. The workshop sessions take the form of a “master-class”, with senior researchers meeting a small number of early career researchers using a particular methodological strategy or technique. The focus will be on questions raised by researchers, and their research will be treated as case studies to generate and engage a set of methodological questions.
The workshops aim at creating a setting where early career researchers can benefit from interaction with experts in their field. The sessions will be facilitated by fellow early career researchers, and the discussants will be established and renowned names in the field of interpretative political analysis, such as Jason Glynos, David Howarth and Aletta Norval. The sessions are fully incorporated into the regular conference program, and the sessions are open to all conference participants.

In order to take part in a workshop session, early career researchers invited to present their work in one of these will be asked to introduce their research project in a 2-3 page summary, pointing to the particular difficulties or methodological questions that arise from their research that they would like to explore in the workshop. Please note it clearly in your inquiry if you wish to be considered for inclusion in a Methodology Workshop. The deadline for inquiries is 30 April 2010. For additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact the chair of the Methodology Workshop Advisory Board (polcon@essex.ac.uk) marking your inquiry clearly for attention: Graham Walker.

Conference Fees*
Conference fees for Staff: £140
Conference fees for Early Career Researchers: £80
*Conference fees include coffee/tea, 3 lunch vouchers and the conference dinner (excluding wine) on Thursday night.
Note: Those not wishing to attend the conference dinner may subtract £30 from the conference fee.

Conference Site
The University of Essex is located in the ancient market town of Colchester and near the picturesque village of Wivenhoe in Northeast Essex. It is about 45 minutes from London by rail, 30 minutes from London’s Stansted Airport by cab or about an hour by bus. The conference programme will offer opportunities to enjoy the traditional villages and countryside in this scenic part of England. More information about accommodation, costs, and venue is available on the website.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

Crisis Sublime

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE IN TORONTO

Historical Materialism Conference
York University, Toronto
May 14-16, 2010

Call for Papers
 
Following on the considerable success of the First North American Historical Materialism Conference in April 2007, attended by 400 people, we are pleased to issue a call for papers for our follow-up conference at York University, May 14-16, 2010.

The conference will take place against the backdrop of a profound destabilization of global capitalism alongside significant challenges for labour and social movements. Imperialist wars abound and culture has been drawn into the service of empire. Robust theorizations and critical innovations are needed.

In this context it is vital to develop the resources of historical materialism in addressing the pressing problems of the day and informing all forms of activism, including the intellectual. The conference seeks to combine rich development of historical materialist analysis with critical innovations in areas where such analysis has lagged. The organizers welcome presentations from scholars and activists that reflect the current state of theoretical work and activist mobilization. Themes include:

•       Marxism and Philosophy

•       Political Economy of Capitalism and the Global Crisis

•       Gender, Sexuality and Social Reproduction

•       Race, Empire and Resistance

•       Ecology and the Environment

•       Working Class and Social Movements

•       Labour Processes and Class Relations

•       Art, Marxism, and Everyday Life

•       Revolutionary Experiences since 1848

•       Fascism, Militarism, Fundamentalism

•       State, Culture and Ideology

•       Land, Food and Accumulation by Dispossession

•       Marxism and the Urban Experience

•       Theorizing Crises in Historical and Comparative Perspective

We welcome individual submissions as well as panel proposals. For individual papers, please send an abstract of no more than 250 words; for panel proposals send a 100 word panel abstract along with paper abstracts of up to 250 words. We appreciate your suggestions about which of the above themes your paper might suits, and also welcome papers beyond these themes. Proposals can be submitted by email until January 8, 2010 to torontohm@gmail.com
 
P.S: Some of you will have received invitations to a Historical Materialism conference in New York in January. We are pleased to see this initiative. But that is a distinct event from the Toronto conference in May.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Unusual Pussus

Unusual Pussus

ENGAGING PETER McLAREN AND THE NEW MARXISM IN EDUCATION

 

David Geoffrey Smith

Interchange, Vol.40/1, pp.93-117 (2009) 

David Geoffrey Smith has written a very interesting and useful article in the latest issue of Interchange. Not only does he review Peter McLaren’s Rage + Hope: Interviews with Peter McLaren on War, Imperialism, & Critical Pedagogy (Peter Lang Publishing, 2006), but he also explores the New Marxism in Education, or the New Marxist Educational Theory (as it is sometimes called). Thus, he examines the impact of McLaren’s work along with other writers on the New Marxism in Education: Paula Allman, Glenn Rikowski, Mike Cole and Dave Hill.

He does spell my name wrong, though: having ‘Glen’ rather than ‘Glenn’ Rikowski. But that’s easily forgivable as Smith has produced an enlightening article. 

You can view the article at: http://www.springerlink.com/content/858j592687nt2554/fulltext.pdf

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

BIO/GEO POLITICS OF RELIGION

2009-10 Seminar at Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, New York, NY

Bio/Geo Politics of Religion
Co-Directors:  Lee Quinby and Sylvia Tomasch

Macaulay Honors College at CUNY invites applications from New York area faculty and doctoral students for the second annual Macaulay Seminar to be held during the 2009-10 academic year.  The Macaulay Seminar seeks to generate lively discussion on a topic vital to our time, to enrich teaching, and to help facilitate research toward publication.

The seminar will meet once per month on Monday evenings throughout the year.  Each member of the seminar will be expected to participate fully in the Seminar and present a paper at the conference on the same topic to be held April 16-18, 2010 at Macaulay.  Participants will be selected from departments across academic divisions to encourage wide-ranging discussion.  All full-time faculty members and graduate students are eligible.  (Other interested parties are welcome to apply).  A stipend of $750 will be awarded to participants.

This seminar will explore what Michel Foucault called “biopolitics,” the relations of power that focus on the management of life, with specific regard to organized religions and practices of religious conduct.  Although recently religion has been widely recognized as a leading force in contemporary life, with movements of both faith-based solidarity and conflict being played out on the world stage, the present context has a long history through which these movements may be understood.  Relevant topics might include themes of apocalypticism and millennialism, the economics of evangelicalism, fundamentalist movements over time and space, the policing of bodies and souls, textual literalism and interpretation, bio- and geo-political conjunctions, manuals of guidance and techniques of surveillance, utopian religious communities in life and literature, and connections between ecos, bios, power, and justice.  Readings will be selected to accommodate the specific interests and expertise of the participants.

The Co-Directors:

Lee Quinby is the inaugural Visiting Professor at Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York City.  The author of three books, Millennial Seduction (1999), Anti-Apocalypse (1994), and Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of America (1991), she is also editor of Genealogy and Literature (1995) and co-editor of Feminism and Foucault (1988) and Gender and Apocalyptic Desire (2006).

Sylvia Tomasch is Associate University Dean of Academic Affairs at Macaulay Honors College and Professor of English at Hunter College, both in the City University of New York. Recent publications include articles on the history of medieval studies, Chaucer, medieval antisemitism, historical cartography, and medieval postcoloniality.

Application deadline:  July 30, 2009.  To request an application or for further information, email: lee.quinby@mhc.cuny.edu or sylvia.tomasch@mhc.cuny.edu

Macaulay Honors College
35 W. 67th Street
New York, NY 10016
t: (212) 729-2919
f: (212) 530-8130

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Friedrich Engels: The Frock-Coated Communist

The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels

Tristram Hunt talks about his new book:

21st May, 7.00pm, Bishopsgate Institute, 230 Bishopsgate, London, EC2M 4QH  

Friedrich Engels is one of the most attractive and contradictory figures of the 19th century. A co-founder of international communism and co-author of The Communist Manifesto, Engels was far more than Marx’s right-hand man. He was a profound thinker in his own right who predicted the social effects of today’s free-market fundamentalism and globalisation. In this talk, Tristram Hunt discusses his biography of Engels, The Frock-Coated Communist, and considers how one of the great bon viveurs of Victorian Britain reconciled his raucous personal life with his uncompromising political philosophy.

Dr Tristram Hunt is one of Britain’s best known young historians. He is a lecturer in British history at Queen Mary, University of London and a former associate fellow at the Centre for History and Economics, King’s College, Cambridge. A leading historical broadcaster, he has authored numerous series for BBC Radio and Television and Channel 4 and is a regular contributor to The Times, The Guardian and The Observer.

 

This event is organised in partnership with Newham Bookshop.

745-747 Barking Road, London E13 9ER: http://newhambooks.co.uk/blog

 

Tickets £6 (Concessions £4)

Tel: 020 7392 9220

Further details and online booking: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/events_details.asp?EventsID=382

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Against Educational Illiteracy: Why Creationism is Wrong and Evolution is Right

Professor Steve Jones

Thursday June 4th 2009, University College London, 17.00 reception, 17.30 lecture, 18.30 refreshments, Great Hall, Strand Campus, WC2R 2LS
All Welcome

Steve Jones is Professor of Genetics and Head of the Biology Department at University College London.  

Guests are kindly requested to register online: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/sspp/education/annual/

Or RSVP to leonie.taylor@kcl.ac.uk

Leonie Taylor
Marketing & Publicity Officer
Department of Education & Professional Studies
King’s College London, Franklin-Wilkins Building
Rm 1/1 Waterloo Bridge Wing
Waterloo Road
London SE1 9NH
Tel : +44 (0)207 848 3139
Fax: +44 (0)207 848 3182

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com