Skip navigation

Tag Archives: French Revolution

Revolution

CRISIS AND MOBILIZATION SINCE 1789

Call for Papers

International Conference “Crisis and Mobilization since 1789” International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, February 22-24, 2013

Organized by the International Scholars’ Network “History of Societies and Socialisms” (HOSAS)/H-Socialisms Organizers of the 2nd HOSAS conference, to be held in Amsterdam in February of 2013, welcome proposals from all fields of the social sciences and humanities from around the world that consider socialism and its relation to the conference theme –Crisis and Mobilization since 1789.

The political Left—mainstream socialists above all, but also anarchists, communists, feminists, and others—has played a central role throughout modern history in giving access to democracy and its benefits to ever widening portions of society. Socialists—especially those organized in Marxist-oriented European social democratic parties—proved adept at mobilizing popular support during political, economic, and other crises to push forward agendas aiming to combat the social inequalities created by industrial capitalism, to broaden citizenly enfranchisement in order to include formerly excluded groups (for example, wage-earning workers and women), and to pursue many other reformist or revolutionary goals. Geoff Eley’s landmark study Forging Democracy (2002), is among the strongest recent arguments for the importance of the socialist Left in shaping and democratizing modern European history, particularly through its capacity for mobilizing in response to crisis. We are pleased that Eley will be present at the conference to give a key-note address and engage in a discussion of his theses.

Alongside impressive successes, resounding defeats and setbacks have characterized socialism’s record in modern Europe and around the world. But until the late 1960s, conventional socialist or social democratic parties stood at the center of this drama and self-consciously led the European Left, while more revolutionary variants held sway in the “developing” world. Since the late 1960s, however, the socialist Left has declined in influence due to the rise of identity and one-issue movements (for example, feminist and environmentalist movements), the changing geographies and modalities of the global economy and labor, the concomitant weakening of trade unions that had constituted socialism’s traditional base of support in many countries, the final discrediting and collapse of Soviet-style “real existing socialism” in Eastern Europe, the growing power of neo-liberalism as the ideology of the political mainstream, and other structural and contingent changes. These developments have challenged conventional socialist politics’ claims to leadership of the political Left and have led many to question socialism’s very relevance.

Since the 2008 onset of the current economic crisis, critiques of capitalism—many of them invoking Marx and/or the socialist mobilizations of previous eras—have re-entered mainstream political debates in Europe and around the world. Scholarly discussions about this legacy and its contemporary relevance have also profited from a surge in interest. Not least, socialist parties have won some significant electoral contests, as they recently did in France. Yet in many places, conventional socialist or Leftist political parties still remain on the defensive and some of the most recent popular mobilizations that challenge the political and economic status quo (for instance, the Occupy Movement) generally reject alliances or identification with established socialist politics.

In this climate, we think it timely to consider the historical trajectory of socialism—in all its diverse forms—through crisis and mobilization. We understand crisis in the broadest sense of the word, encompassing not just economic downturns, but also political, social, cultural, and environmental crises as well as war, famine, natural disasters, and other disruptions. Crises vary in scale too, from the global or continental level down to the local. By bringing together scholars from multiple disciplines who specialize in various time periods and places across the globe, and by opening broad temporal, comparative, and transnational vistas, we hope to update and enrich the scholarly conversation about socialism(s).

Among the core questions that we aim to address are:

– How have socialist politics developed historically as a response to crisis, broadly defined, and through mobilization?

– Why have certain people and movements in history self-identified as “socialist,” and which theories and concepts have they drawn on?

– How and what did these people and movements learn from their activist experiences, and what are the memories and legacies of mass mobilization in times of crisis?

– What lessons – if any – do present-day activists and movements draw from the past, and how are various memories and myths appropriate to current debates and actions?

– To what extent have socialist mobilizations that respond to crisis displayed unique characteristics in the non-European/western or developing world?

– What have socialist mobilizations accomplished (or not accomplished) in attempting to redefine the relationships between the state and society and between society and capitalism?

– How has the recent economic crisis contributed to, or changed, socialist politics as well as our understanding of socialism as an aspect of European or global modernity?

– How have socialists (of any sort) stood in relation to other Leftist political groupings and/or non-Leftists in responding to crisis, both historically and today?

– To what extent does “socialism” remain a useful category for animating/galvanizing or studying mobilizations of a certain kind?

In addition to papers that address one or more of these questions, we invite papers or panels dealing with any of the following broad thematic areas in any part of the world that have relevance to the central conference theme:

I. Capitalism in Crisis: Experiences, diagnoses and solutions, past and present

II. Riots, Revolts & Revolutions: Violent reactions, street activisms, and their outcomes

III. Parties & Movements: Organisations, networks, and institutions

IV. Ideas & Programs: Analyses, ideologies, and remedies

V. Rebels & Leaders: Who is in charge, why and how?

VI. Elites & Masses: Interests, alliances, and encounters

We invite both junior and senior scholars to present results of research, works-in-progress, or polished papers concerning these issues and others related to the general workshop theme. We are interested in receiving individual paper proposals and proposals for panel sessions. The organizers will consider publishing some of the contributions following the conference. Conference presentations will be 15 minutes in length.

Please email your proposal (250-300 words) along with a brief (100 words max.) academic bio,

to H-SOCIALISMS@H-NET.MSU.EDU by September 30, 2012.

Keynote speaker:

Geoff Eley (University of Michigan): Forging Democracy: On the history of the “Left”, 1850-2000

The organizers are:

Giovanni Bernardini, German-Italian Historical Institute – FBK, Trento, Italy

Christina Morina, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany

Jakub S. Beneš, University of California, Davis, USA

Kasper Braskén, Åbo Akademi University, Finland

For more information on HOSAS/H-Socialisms, visit: http:// www.h-net.org/~socialisms/

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-201ccrisis-and-mobilization-since-1789201d-international-institute-of-social-history-amsterdam-february-22-24-2013

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Birds

FASHION AND MATERIALISM

Ulrich Lehmann (University for the Creative Arts)

Marxism in Culture Seminar
Friday 15 June 2012, 17.30-19.30
Senate Room, 1st Floor Senate House (Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU)

Fashion is the most materialist of industries, promoting the constant consumption of new objects at ever increasing intervals. Yet fashion has not been subject to any substantial materialist critique or analysis. In this seminar I will discuss the historical basis and contemporary approach to a materialism of fashion.
Ulrich Lehmann is a cultural historian living inLondon. He works across two areas of research: 1) European cultural history of the long nineteenth century (French Revolution to fin-de-siecle), in particular artisanal labour, its organisation and products; 2) modern fashion history and theory (1860 to today), especially the cross-over between clothing and other cultural philosophies and expressions.
All welcome!

http://www.marxisminculture.org

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Progress

HOW TO END A REVOLUTION?

CALL FOR PAPERS (DEADLINE: JANUARY 31st, 2012)
The Annual Interdisciplinary Humanities Graduate Student Conference
Harvard University, Cambridge MA, United States
April 13-14, 2012

How to begin a revolution is a question that has received much attention from many great thinkers. The goal of the 2012 Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference at the Mahindra Humanities Center is to reverse that perspective and ask: How to end a revolution?

The end of a revolution is not something inherently given, but a process in the making that serves different perspectives and interests. At the same time, the phase of transition characterized by chaos and instability very often opposes and challenges the attempts of making an end – from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. Is an end of a revolution even possible if history is understood as a constant process based on a linear definition of time and temporality? What challenges does the idea of a leaderless movement pose towards traditional views of political authority and authorship? What happens when unity and cohesion break apart and many different individual interests and powers evolve? What comes after the revolution?

The ongoing revolutions and uprisings in the Arab world highlight both the challenges of making a (constructive and collective) end, as well as the significance and timeliness of these questions to be addressed at the conference. Drawing upon contemporary and historical examples like the Arab Spring and the French Revolution, we invite you to examine the complex, multifaceted and mutable discourse that is shaped by historians who define, politicians who declare, writers who narrate and lawyers who legitimate the end of a revolution. In what violent and non-violent ways have people tried to stop, use or influence a revolution? Which strategies, tools and techniques are employed to end a revolution and how are they determined by underlying concepts of time, history and change? Through our collective
inquiry – by analysing how people deal and dealt with moments of transition and by comparing their strategies, interests and narratives – our goal is to better understand the phenomenon of social and political change. With this approach we hope not only to expand the knowledge of revolutions but also to develop new ideas and strategies that will potentially prove to be practically important and relevant.

We seek rich, rigorous graduate student contributions from the humanities, social and political sciences (in particular from the following disciplines: law, literature, history, philosophy, political sciences, sociology), and even natural sciences if relevant.

Discussion themes may include, but are not restricted to:
* What is an End? Thinking About and Representing the End
* The End Versus Ending – Revolution as Process or Given?
* Controlling the End – Controlling the Power. Attempts of Overtaking the Protest
* Temporality, Change – and Order? How to Transform Chaos into Stability
* New Beginnings. Manifestos and Literary Narratives
* The People, the Media or the Military? Authorship of Revolution
* Continuity of Power. How to Deal with the Old Structures?
* Circular Revolution, Linear Progress and Permanent Evolution?
* Arts, Religion and Empathy. Lessons to Unite the People
* Trials, Constitutions and Elections. The Role of Law in Transitional Periods

We ask prospective participants to submit a short curriculum vitae and a 500 word abstract that outlines the paper’s topic, methodology and argument, as well as how the prospective participant’s research interests relate to the theme of the conference more generally. Participants will be notified by mid-February whether their paper has been accepted into the conference. Please note that participants can apply for a limited number of travel grants.

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION: TUESDAY, JANUARY 31st, 2012

For more information and submission details, please visit: http://isites.harvard.edu/revolution2012

For further questions, please contact the coordinators by e-mail: hcconfer@fas.harvard.edu

Conference coordinators:
Eike Hosemann, Harvard Law School
Scott Liddle, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Matthias Meyer, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Ani Nguyen, Chemical Biology Graduate Program, Department of Systems Biology

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Chartism

HOBSBAWM: HISTORY AND POLITICS

Gregory Elliott

Pluto Press, 12/7/2010
ISBN: 978-0-7453-2844-7, ISBN10: 0-7453-2844-X, 5 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches, 160 pages,

Historian Eric Hobsbawm is possibly the foremost chronicler of the modern age. His panoramic studies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, stretching from the French Revolution to the fall of Soviet communism, have informed the historical consciousness of scholars and general readers alike. At the same time, his writings on labour movements and socialist politics have occupied a central place in left-wing debates. Despite this, no extended study of Hobsbawm’s work has yet been attempted. Gregory Elliott fills this gap in exemplary fashion.

Elliott analyzes both the scholarly record of Hobsbawm and the intellectual and political journey that his life represents. I n doing so, he seeks to situate Hobsbawm’s thought within the context of a generalised crisis of confidence on the Left after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Rich in content and written in Elliott’s authoritative and highly readable style, this book is a must for anyone with an interest in Hobsbawm and the crisis of the Left.

“The remarkable and prolific works of Eric Hobsbawm have gone too long without a serious critical analysis which treats them as an evolving whole. In a closely argued and highly readable account, Gregory Elliott sets out to fill this gap. Reviewing Hobsbawm’s intellectual and political formation, his contributions to both academic and political debates, and his climactic interpretation of 20th century world history, Elliott provides not only a summary of each in turn but also a revealing exploration of the light they shed on each other.” –Justin Rosenberg, Reader in International Relations, University of Sussex
Gregory Elliott is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His books include Ends in Sight (Pluto, 2008), Perry Anderson: The Merciless Laboratory of History (1998) and Althusser: The Detour of Theory (2nd edition, 2006).

Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
1 Formative Experiences, Refounding Moments
2 The International and the Island Race
3 Enigmatic Variations
Conclusion: The Verdict of the World
Notes
Bibliography
Index

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

WORKSHOP ON AGRARIAN REFORM

22nd – 25th SEPTEMBER 2010

PARIS

http://actuelmarx.u-paris10.fr/cm6/index6.htm

La Réforme agraire, au passé et au futur

coordonné par Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

La Reforma Agraria, en pasado y futuro

Agrarian Reforms: Past and Future

La Section histoire du Congrès Marx International VI, Crise, révoltes, utopies propose la réunion d’un Atelier de travail consacré a la discussion, dans une perspective historienne et marxiste, de cette problématique du monde contemporain. Il est ouvert aux spécialistes de l’étude de la réforme agraire de par le monde. Mais il voudrait aussi amorcer une réflexion sur la réalité des mondes ruraux actuels et des désastres humains et naturels provoqués dans les campagnes par plusieurs décennies d’un néolibéralisme mondialisé et impitoyable. Il voudrait également s’interroger sur le futur d’une lutte pour la réforme agraire, dans son sens originel, qui semble désormais plus actuelle que jamais.

La réforme de la possession des terres est une aspiration moderne. Après les projets des philosophes, des théologiens et des penseurs, les hommes politiques réformateurs ont essayé de la mettre en pratique avec toutefois des objectifs différents, que ce soit dans le monde britannique ou en Europe continentale (les pays germaniques et nordiques, la France, la Péninsule ibérique, la Péninsule italienne). A la fin du 18e siècle, la Révolution française a eu, tel que nous le savons, une forte composante agraire et paysanne. La nationalisation et la vente des biens du clergé et de la noblesse, pour s’attaquer aux forces hostiles au processus révolutionnaire, a pu ouvrir la voie à un important transfert de terres dans le court et dans le moyen terme, qui a également favorisé certains segments sociaux du monde paysan.

Sous des formes diverses, tout le 19e siècle a été marqué ici et là, y compris en Russie et en Amérique, par la question agraire et par celle de la possession de la terre. Ces deux ambitions ont été en même temps des revendications socioéconomiques et politiques, rattachées souvent, dans le cadre des empires, à la reconnaissance des peuples et des nations sans Etat et à la lutte contre l’oppression nationale, pour la liberté. La paysannerie et sa lutte pour la terre et contre les propriétaires fanciers et les hobereaux, étrangers ou autochtones, se sont ainsi régulièrement situées au cœur du mouvement national.

Mais il a fallu attendre 1910 — il y a tout juste un siècle —, pour voir vraiment apparaître le mot « réforme agraire » dans sa signification contemporaine. Et avec le mot son contenu et avec le contenu son application politique concrète, dans le contexte d’un mouvement populaire victorieux. C’est au Mexique, — où se produit la première révolution du 20e siècle — et dans la pratique des mouvements paysans puis des gouvernements révolutionnaires, que la réforme agraire a pris tout son sens de lutte pour le changement de la propriété de la terre, pour la réforme du régime de travail, pour la transformation du système de production et de distribution de la richesse, et aussi pour le pouvoir politique de l’Etat. Le mot d’ordre Terre et liberté qui synthétisait alors, et durant plusieurs décennies, les aspirations des Indiens et des paysans mexicains est devenu depuis la pierre de touche des projets de réforme agraire formulés et mis en pratique.

Le 20e siècle a connu des réformes agraires, au pluriel, les unes plus radicales que les autres, proposées soit par la lutte paysanne et ouvrière révolutionnaire, soit par des Etats réformateurs (parfois militaires et/ou nationalistes), et même par des projets politiques qui ont voulu preserver la société et le système en vigueur et contrecarrer des mouvements révolutionnaires en perspective. Cette tendance, mondialement transversale, n’a pratiquement épargnée aucune région du monde: l’ancienne Russie devenu URSS, la Chine populaire, l’Europe centrale, orientale et méridionale, l’Inde, l’Indochine, l’Amérique latine, et meme l’Afrique d’avant et d’après les décolonisations.

Les propositions d’intervention peuvent être envoyées jusqu’au 30 juin 2010 à pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne)

La Reforma Agraria, en pasado y futuro

La reforma de la posesión de la tierra es una aspiración moderna. Luego de los proyectos esbozados por filósofos, teólogos y pensadores, los hombres políticos reformistas intentaron ponerla en práctica —aun cuando fuera con objetivos distintos—, ya sea en el mundo británico o en Europa continental (Los países germánicos y nórdicos, Francia, la Península Ibérica o la Península Italiana). A finales del siglo XVIII, como sabemos, la revolución francesa tuvo un fuerte componente agrario y campesino. La nacionalización y venta de los bienes del clero y la nobleza, para neutralizar a las fuerzas hostiles al proceso revolucionario, desencadenó a corto y a mediano plazo una importante transferencia de tierras que también favoreció a determinados segmentos sociales del mundo campesino.

Bajo formas distintas y en diversos lugares, incluso en Rusia y en el continente americano, todo el siglo XIX estuvo signado por la cuestión agraria y la cuestión de la posesión de la tierra. Estas dos ambiciones fueron al mismo tiempo reivindicaciones socioeconómicas y políticas, muy ligadas en el contexto de los imperios al reconocimiento de los pueblos y naciones sin Estado y a la lucha por la libertad y contra la oppression nacional. El campesinado y su lucha por la tierra y contra los terratenientes e hidalgüelos, oriundos o extranjeros, se situaron muy a menudo en el corazón de los movimientos nacionales.

Pero hubo que esperar 1910 —hace exactamente un siglo—, para asistir a la aparición verdadera de la palabra « reforma agraria » en su acepción contemporánea. Y con la fórmula el contenido ; y con el contenido su aplicación política concreta, en el cuadro de un movimiento popular victorioso. Fue en México —en donde se produjo la primera revolución del siglo XX— y en la práctica de los movimientos campesinos, primero, y luego en la de los gobiernos revolucionarios, donde y cuando la réforma agrarian adquirió todo su sentido de lucha por el cambio en la propiedad de la tierra, por la reforma del régimen de trabajo, por la transformación del sistema de producción y distribución de la riqueza y también por el poder político del Estado. La consigna Tierra y Libertad que concretizó entonces, y durante varias décadas, las aspiraciones de los indios y campesinos mexicanos, se volvió la piedra de toque de los proyectos de reforma agraria concebidos y puestos en aplicación.

El siglo XX asistió a reformas agrarias, en plural; unas más radicals que las otras. Algunas propuestas por la lucha campesina y obrera revolucionaria, otras por Estados reformistas (a veces militares y/o nacionalistas), e incluso algunas fomentadas por proyectos políticos que quisieron preservar el orden y el sistema vigentes, contrarrestando movimientos revolucionarios en ciernes. Fue una tendencia mundialmente transversal, que no dispensó a casi ninguna región del planeta: la antigua Rusia, transformada en URSS ; China popular ; Europa central, meridional y oriental ; India e Indochina ; América Latina ; e incluso la Africa de antes y de después de las descolonizaciones.

La Sección Historia del Congreso Marx Internacional VI, Crisis, Revueltas, Utopías (http://netx.u-paris10.fr/actuelmarx/cm6/index6.htm), que tendrá lugar en París —entre el 22 y el 25 de septiembre de 2010—, propone reunir sobre esta problemática del mundo contemporáneo un Taller de trabajo y discusión, en una perspectiva histórica y marxista. Un encuentro abierto a los especialistas del estudio de la reforma agraria en el mundo. Pero también un encuentro para reflexionar sobre la realidad de los mundos rurales actuales y los desastres humanos y naturales provocados en el campo por varias décadas de un neoliberalismo mundializado y despiadado. También desearía interrogarse sobre el porvenir de una lucha por la reforma agraria, en su sentido original, que parece de aquí en adelante más actual que nunca.

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Agrarian Reforms: Past and Future

Reforms related to land ownership is a modern hope. After Philosophes, theologians and thinkers had earlier made their own proposals for change, political reformers then tried to implement their own specific reforms, their objectives being however different, whether in Britain or in Continental Europe (German and Scandinavian countries, France, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas). At the end of the 18th century, the French Revolution had a significant agrarian and peasant component, as we all know. The nationalization and sale of clergy and aristocratic land and property, which aimed at suppressing the forces hostile to the Revolutionary process, opened the door to important land transfers as a short-term or medium-term phenomenon, which also favorised some groups within the peasantry.

In different ways in the 19th century, various places, including Russia and America, were affected by issues related to land distribution and land ownership. These two phenomena also reflected socio-economic and political demands which within empires were often associated to the recognition of the peoples and nations without State deprived of self-determination and to their fight against oppression towards liberty. The peasantry and its fight for land against large land owners and foreign or national squires and hobereaux were thus recurrently caught in the middle of national movements.

It was however in 1910 —one hundred years ago only— that the concept of “agrarian reform” was for the first time formulated and given its contemporary meaning. And with the word, there followed its concrete political implementation, within a victorious popular movement. It was in Mexico that the first twentieth-century revolution took place with the development of peasant movements and the establishment of revolutionary governments. There, agrarian reforms reflected the fight for land ownership changes, for labour reforms, for the transformation of the production and redistribution of wealth, and also for state power. The slogan “Land and liberty” which symbolized then and for several decades Indian and Mexican peasants’ aspirations became the touchstone of all the agrarian reforms which were then proposed and implemented.

The 20th Century knew several agrarian reforms, some being more radical than others, proposed either by peasant or working-class revolutionary groups or by reformatory States (sometimes military and/or nationalist ones) and even political projects whose programs aimed at preserving the status quo in their current society and government in an attempt to counteract and downplay growing revolutionary movements. This world trend spared almost no part of the world from old Russia (now USSR), the People’s Republic of China, Central, Eastern and Southern Europe, India, Indochina, Latin America, and even Africa before and after decolonization.

The History Section of the VI International Marx Conference entitled Crisis, revolts, utopias (http://netx.u-paris10.fr/actuelmarx/cm6/index6.htm), which will meet in Paris — September 22nd – 25th, 2010 — proposes a workshop to discuss these contemporary issues using a Marxist and historical perspective. It welcomes specialists of the study of agrarian reforms in the world. The intent is also to engage in discussions on today’s rural reality and on human and natural disasters taking place in rural areas which experienced several decades of ruthless global neoliberal governance. The organizers will also encourage debates on the future of the campaign for agrarian reforms in its original form, one which seems more topical than ever.

Pablo F. Luna (Université Paris Sorbonne): pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Organisateur  : Pablo F. Luna, pablo-fernando.luna@paris-sorbonne.fr 
Maître de conférences, Histoire, Université Paris Sorbonne, Paris IV

Président de séance : Béaur Gérard, Professeur, Histoire, GDR 2912, CRH – EHESS, CNRS
Président de séance : Piel Jean, Professeur, Histoire, Université Denis Diderot, Paris 7

Barkin David, barkin@correo.xoc.uam.mx  Professeur, Economie, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana de México, Xochimilco, Mexique

Pour reconsidérer le nouveau rôle de la paysannerie en Amérique latine: Les nouvelles réalités communautaires rurales

Partout où elles se trouvent en Amérique latine, les communautés agraires et indigènes réagissent devant le rétrécissement de possibilités résultant de l’effort gouvernemental d’internationalisation économique. Leur réponse articule des stratégies locales et régionales d’autonomie visant l’autosuffisance à plusieurs niveaux, pas seulement sur le plan alimentaire mais aussi sur le plan des infrastructures, des services sociaux (par exemple, la santé et l’éducation), de la préservation et de la réhabilitation de l’environnement. Cette communication voudrait apporter, à partir des expériences locales concrètes, une discussion sur les notions analytiques qui permettraient de comprendre ces stratégies productives et politiques, confrontées aux defies lancés aux communautés. Et ceci afin de mettre en relief une nouvelle approche pour élaborer des réponses « post-capitalistes ».

Bregianni Catherine, cbregiann@academyofathens.gr, Chercheuse-enseignante, Histoire, Université Ouverte Grecque, Grèce

Réforme agraire et monétisation de l’économie agraire en Grèce (de la fin du XIXe siècle à la Seconde Guerre mondiale)

Dans le but d’examiner la réforme agraire en Grèce, ayant eu lieu pendant la période de l’entre-deux-guerres, exprimant les objectifs politiques de la Première République Grecque, il a fallu observer premièrement l’évolution de la question rurale qui dans le pays s’est posée en même temps que celle de l’expansion territoriale. Ainsi, une première réforme a été appliquée au cours des années 1870, quand les terres nationales ont été partiellement divisées et octroyées aux paysans sans terre par le gouvernement libéral. La formation d’une classe sociale de petits propriétaires fonciers, orientée vers la culture des produits commerciaux, a ainsi été mise en œuvre, laquelle — en alliance avec les élites du Royaume — aurait pu soutenir les efforts de modernisation. Néanmoins, l’annexion de la Thessalie, en 1881, et ensuite celle de la Macédoine grecque en 1912, ont donné naissance à la question rurale, puisque le mode de production dominante y était la grande propriété foncière. Outil des Etats réformateurs grecs, la reforme agraire des années 1920 a provoqué la création de mécanismes d’incorporation de l’agriculture à l’économie nationale, tels que les coopératives agricoles et la diffusion du crédit agricole. Ainsi, dans le secteur agricole ont été créés des réseaux techniques qui avaient en même temps une fonction sociale, tels les réseaux bancaires et les réseaux de coopératives agricoles. La protection de l’agriculture a également induit l’articulation des instituts étatiques visant à implanter dans le monde rural les méthodes de culture rationnelles. Sans doute, la politique modernisatrice de l’Etat grec pour l’économie agraire visait aussi à anticiper les protestations paysannes et à contrecarrer l’influence croissante du parti communiste à la campagne (étant donné qu’en Grèce la classe ouvrière était fortement liée au monde rural). La faillite du schéma linéaire « réforme agraire – monétarisation de l’économie rurale – expansion des coopératives agricoles » à la fin des années trente a été souvent approchée par l’historiographie moderne grecque comme étant le résultat de l’activité bancaire. Ι lest néanmoins clair que les mécanismes bancaires ne sont pas autonomes vis-à-vis du marché. Cet aspect nous aidera à formuler nos conclusions afin de nous approcher au présent, en ce qui concerne la situation actuelle de l’agriculture grecque, sous le prisme du néolibéralisme.

Brocheux Pierre, pib531@wanadoo.fr  Professeur, Histoire, Université Denis Diderot, Paris 7

Réforme agraire et Développement au Viet Nam : contradiction ou complémentarité? (1953-1989)

Dans un but à la fois politique et économique les gouvernements au pouvoir dans le nord (République démocratique du Viet Nam) et dans le sud (République du Viet Nam) ont changé l’assiette foncière de leur paysannerie en appliquant des méthodes différentes. Les communistes du nord ont fait une révolution agraire à la manière chinoise avec reference à la lutte des classes, la mise en place de tribunaux populaires et sociodrames, expropriations et exécutions des personnes. Cette revolution agraire qui débute en 1953, utilise la violence physique et engendre des « erreurs » qui sont corrigées en 1956-1957. Cette « correction » donne lieu à une redistribution des terres, qui n’est que le prélude à la collectivisation des campagnes jugée nécessaire à l’essor de la grande agriculture moderne qui doit accompagner et soutenir l’industrialisation. Le gouvernement du Sud Viet Nam applique tardivement (1970-1971) des procédures légales et non violentes (sur le modèle japonais et taïwanais). La réforme renforce les rangs et le rôle économique de la petite et moyenne paysannerie qui fait échouer la collectivisation que les communistes veulent introduire dans le sud après avoir conquis et réunifié le pays (1975-1976). La réforme agraire du sud qui avait pour but politique de couper l’herbe sous les pieds des communistes, révèle son efficacité, elle est l’une des raisons déterminantes de la politique dite de Rénovation du gouvernement socialiste du Viet Nam. La Rénovation débute dans les campagnes et enclenche la dé-collectivisation, autrement dit un deuxième partage des terres. Le retour à l’exploitation familiale est aussi celui à l’économie de marché et à la spéculation commerciale et foncière. Cette évolution pose la question : le développement dans son sens classique ne favorise-t-il pas le retour à la concentration foncière et à la différenciation sociale dans campagnes ?

Cohen Arón, acohen@ugr.es  Professeur, Géographie,  Universidad de Granada, Espagne
Ferrer Amparo, aferrer@ugr.es  Maître de conférences, Géographie, Universidad de Granada, Espagne

Des « sans terre » aux « sans papiers » ? Réflexions à propos des campagnes andalouses

Au lendemain de la mort de Franco la revendication d’une réforme agraire restait un des signes programmatiques de l’opposition antifranquiste la plus active. Au début des années 1980, au cœur de la Transition politique, le PSOE cumulant le gouvernement central et ceux des toutes récentes «autonomies» de l’Espagne méridionale, inspirait la Carte de l’Autonomie Andalouse. Un des objectifs affichés était la « réforme agraire entendue comme la transformation (…) des structures agraires » dans la région. Cet objectif est resté complètement inédit, et assez vite la remise à jour du vocabulaire, dans le discours politique dominant et dans les normes, a effacé la moindre source de malentendu : point de recours désormais à d’autres catégories que celles de la « modernisation » et de l’ « entreprise » agricoles. Parallèlement, avec l’émergence de l’Espagne comme pays d’immigration, l’ « immigré » s’est quasiment substitué au « journalier » dans les discourse en vogue… et comme objet d’analyse. Les sujets sociaux et la nature des dossiers ne sont plus les mêmes. Les réclamations des « papiers pour tous » et contre l’ « exclusion sociale » ne laisseraient-elles plus de place aux « questions agraires »?

Estevam Douglas, douglasestevam@mst.org.br Représentant du MST, Brésil, Mouvement des paysans sans terre, Brésil

Les limites de la reforme agraire au Brésil et les conséquences du renforcement du modèle de l’agrobusiness

Cette communication analysera les conséquences du modèle brésilien de l’agrobusiness, à partir de plusieurs points de vue. D’abord, du point de vue social, avec la reproduction d’une population de paysans sans terres. Ensuite, du point de vue économique, en fonction de la concentration de richesse qu’un tel modèle engendre, de la réduction du nombre de travailleurs agricoles, des problèmes concernant les conditions de travail, ou à propos de l’absence d’une politique publique pour la production vivrière, mais aussi du point de vue du rôle du capital financier dans la production agricole et dans la concentration des terres. Ce modèle se configure dans le cadre d’un marché de plus un plus internationalisé et dans un contexte de crise énergétique où la production d’agro-carburants se présente comme un secteur économique de grande importance.

Figueroa A. Víctor  Professeur, Histoire, Universidad Marta Abreu, Las Villas, Cuba

Cuba : une expérience de développement rural

Cette communication présente et résume l’expérience cubaine dans la mise en œuvre de la Loi de la réforme agraire de 1959. Elle explique les conditions objectives historiques qui ont conduit à cet événement; elle présente aussi une analyse des premiers résultats obtenus. Cette communication fournit également les données statistiques illustrant la
situation avant et après la mise en œuvre de la loi, ainsi que les principales caractéristiques particulières du cas cubain.

Jacobs Susan, S.Jacobs@mmu.ac.uk  Reader, Sociologie, Manchester Metropolitan University, Grande-Bretagne

Gender and agrarian reforms : Critical reflections

Au cours des dernières années, lorsque l’on a parlé de la réforme agraire ou de la redistribution des terres, ce sont des sujets tels que la hausse des prix ou la sécurité alimentaires, ou l’appropriation des terres, qui ont concentré l’attention des spécialistes. Cette communication voudrait examiner l’impact des processus de réforme agraire sur les femmes, en particulier dans le modèle familial individuel. Dans des nombreux contextes et sous l’optique de la tenure et de la conduite des terres, les femmes se sont trouvées dans une situation défavorable, que ce soit du point de vue de la concession des titres de possession ou par la préférence accordée aux hommes comme chefs de famille. Cependant, des groupes familiaux conduits par des femmes ont souvent obtenu des terres et dans certaines réalités, en Chine, au Viet Nam ou dans certains pays d’Amérique latine, on a essayé de garantir les droits à la terre des femmes mariées. L’exploitation des terres ouvre aux femmes la possibilité de la réussite mais il leur est toujours difficile d’accéder à la terre sur un même plan d’égalité que les hommes. L’une des questions posées est celle de la forme que ces droits devraient prendre : la coutume traditionnelle est fréquemment défavorable aux femmes, mais l’accès individuel aux titres de possession débouche souvent, surtout parmi les pauvres, à la dépossession des terres. Cette communication examine ces faits et les tensions qu’ils ont provoquées, à partir de plusieurs études de cas, au Viet Nam, au Zimbabwe et au Brésil. Quel a été le rôle joué par le mouvement des femmes et les autres mouvements sociaux et comment devront-ils se consolider pour assurer, à l’avenir et sur le terrain, les droits des femmes?

Mesini Béatrice Mesini@mmsh.univ-aix.fr  Chargé de recherche, Sociologie politique, CNRS Telemme, Université d’Aix-en-Provence

Dynamiques et enjeux de la réforme agraire dans les forums sociaux 2000-2008

Inscrite dans une sociologie des mobilisations collectives, cette analyse décentrée sur des segments de luttes locales et globales, se propose d’explorer la diversité et l’originalité des revendications portées par les acteurs paysans et ruraux dans les forums sociaux – locaux, nationaux, régionaux, continentaux et internationaux – mais aussi « généralistes » et « thématiques » entre 2000 et 2008. C’est suite au tournant neoliberal opéré dans les années 1990 sous l’effet des programmes d’ajustements structurels impulsés par les grandes institutions financiers internationales (Banque Mondiale, Fonds Monétaire International, OMC…) que les sans-terre, journaliers, paysans familiaux, pêcheurs, peoples autochtones menacés, ruraux déplacés, femmes exploitées se sont en effet mobilisés sur la définition de leurs droits d’existence. Ils ont progressivement investi les forums sociaux, arguant de la centralité de leurs luttes dans les divers ateliers, plénières, séminaires, notamment autour des questions de domination et d’exploitation, dans les rapports de classe, de caste, de race et de genre. Autour du thème de la réforme agraire, les associations, organisations et collectifs structurent et amplifient le cadre interprétatif d’une negation globale des droits humains fondamentaux mais aussi de la disparition orchestrée des usages communautaires et droits collectifs – économiques, sociaux, culturels, cultuels, environnementaux – sur les terres. Dans un premier temps, nous montrerons comment ces acteurs ruraux hétérogènes ont accompli, à partir des années 1990, un travail de convergence et de transnationalisation des luttes, sur la base de diagnostics partagés en termes de privation, d’exclusion, de pauvreté, d’exploitation et de misère. Sont en particulier incriminés la privatisation des ressources et des terres, la concentration et l’internationalisation du capital foncier, le maintien de structures sociales agraires héritées de la colonisation et/ou recomposée de façon multiforme par le développement durable, le développement de l’ « agrobusiness », le brevetage du vivant, la destruction des communautés de vie, les migrations forcées – internes et
internationales -, l’exploitation et la violence dans les champs, ou encore la criminalisation et la répression des mouvements sociaux et des luttes syndicales. En second lieu, nous mettrons au jour le double processus d’intrication des luttes paysannes, indigènes/autochtones, mais aussi d’articulation des luttes rurales et urbaines, réactivé dans les Forums sociaux en termes d’autonomie, de sécurité et de souveraineté alimentaire, gagnant progressivement l’ensemble des nations, des continents et des régions. Enfin, nous montrerons que l’expressivité des revendications dans ces tribunes relève d’une pluralité de luttes locales, singulières et diversifiées et que la « co-vision » de la Pacha Mama redessine, à partir de la définition de devoirs envers la « Terre commune », le contour des droits d’existence civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux, et culturels.

Martínez Luciano (Intervention à confirmer)  Chercheur, Sociologie, FLACSO – Universidad de Quito, Equateur

Equateur, les nouveaux propriétaires après la réforme agraire

Mignemi Niccoló, mignic@gmail.com  Doctorant, Histoire, EHESS Paris – Università degli Studi di Milano, Italie

Italie 1920-1950 : Vers la réforme agraire ou la réforme de l’agriculture ?

Les lois de réforme agraire de 1950 en Italie ont été adoptées sous la pression d’un mouvement paysan qui a débuté dans le Mezzogiorno en 1943-1944 et s’est diffusé dans toutes les campagnes du pays. Le fascisme, ruraliste dans son discours, l’était beaucoup moins dans ses pratiques, en dissimulant le progressif appauvrissement des petits paysans derrière la propagande du retour à la terre. C’est donc en suivant le sort des paysans, au moins depuis le début des années Vingt, alors qu’ils vivent une période de prospérité, interrompue par les décisions prises par le régime et par la crise des années Trente, que l’on pourra comprendre dans la longue durée la signification de l’explosion sociale des campagnes dans l’après-guerre. Ici par ailleurs, si les forces antifascistes ont pris conscience que la résolution de la question agraire, toujours renvoyée depuis l’unité politique de 1861, ne pouvait plus être esquivée, deux conceptions s’affrontent alors : d’un côté la perspective d’une réforme agraire générale, avec la réorganisation du secteur primaire dans son ensemble qui pouvait remettre en cause son rôle même dans le modèle de développement, de l’autre côté l’idée d’une réforme minimale, voire seulement foncière, limitée soit au niveau géographique, soit dans ses ambitions.

Oliveira (de) Batista Fernando (Intervention à confirmer) Professeur, Agronomie, Universidade Politecnica de Lisboa, Portugal

La question de la terre aujourd’hui : Pour une comparaison entre le Portugal, le Brésil et l’Angola.

Robledo Ricardo, rrobledo@usal.es Histoire Professeur Universidad de Salamanca, Espagne

La réforme agraire de la Seconde République espagnole : Une question déjà vue ?

La recherche sur la réforme agraire, qui a été une sujet central dans l’historiographie espagnole, plus ou moins jusqu’en 1980, a été ensuite peu à peu négligée voire oubliée ; ce qui n’a pas été par ailleurs l’apanage de la seule Espagne. D’un côté, le travail d’Edward Malefakis (Reforma agraria y revolución campesina en la España del siglo XX, Barcelona, Ariel, 1972) a joué jusqu’à un certain point un rôle dissuasif, ce qui a fait que certaines recherches ultérieures se sont souvent contentées de paraphraser une œuvre qui a été publiée il y a environ quarante ans. D’un autre côté, l’orientation internationale de la politique économique, mettant en question les réformes agraires latino-américaines, n’a pas été un facteur favorable pour encourager une telle recherche. L’un des nombreux reproches adressés à la réforme agraire de la Seconde République espagnole a été son choix anti-latifundium, tout en mettant en opposition la rentabilité supposée de la grande exploitation face à l’inefficacité imputée au partage des terres. Ce serait l’un des aspects de la réforme agraire que les ingénieurs agronomes auraient mis en cause dans leurs rapports —des rapports très peu utilisés, par ailleurs. Mais il y aurait aussi un autre aspect, celui de la fonction sociale du latifundium, que l’on n’étudie pas d’une façon simultanée avec l’examen du fait réformateur, ce qui donne lieu à des perceptions partielles de la problématique. On néglige de préciser les avantages sociaux découlant de la perte par les propriétaires de leurs prérogatives politiques. En tout cas, la réforme agraire ne peut et ne doit être présentée comme une panacée et l’on peut tout autant apprendre de son échec — dans sa mise en application — que de son succès.

Roux Bernard, bernard.roux@agroparistech.fr Chercheur, Agronomie, CESAER – INRA Agrocampus Dijon

Au Portugal: Vie et mort d’une réforme agraire prolétarienne

La « révolution des œillets » d’avril 1974 au Portugal a été suivie par des mouvements sociaux et des réformes qui, dans un premier temps, orientèrent la société portugaise vers le socialisme. L’évolution rapide des rapports de force politiques, en faveur des conservateurs, ne permit pas que cette orientation perdure. La réalisation d’une réforme agraire puis sa destruction, tout cela dans un bref délai de quelques années, doivent s’interpréter dans ce cadre. C’est au cours de l’année 1975 que les ouvriers agricoles, dont une majorité de journaliers, de l’Alentejo et du Ribatejo, dans la moitié sud du pays, soutenus par les forces progressistes au pouvoir, ont réalisé l’occupation de plus d’un million d’hectares des latifundia et des grandes exploitations capitalistes. Cette réforme agraire peut être qualifiée de prolétarienne pour deux raisons : d’abord parce que son principal moteur a été le proletariat rural, depuis toujours soumis à l’exploitation de la bourgeoisie agraire mais auteur de nombreuses luttes pour l’amélioration des conditions de travail et des salaires ; ensuite, en raison de la nature collective des nouvelles unités de production créées, certaines d’entre elles dépassant 10 000 ha. Avec le basculement du pouvoir à droite la contre réforme agraire fut mise en œuvre dès 1977. Les terres furent rendues aux grands propriétaires et les unités de production des ouvriers agricoles détruites.

Siron Thomas, thomassiron@gmail.com  Doctorant, Anthopologie, EHESS Marseille

« Je ne demande pas d’argent pour cheminer ! » Le dirigeant paysan, la redistribution foncière et l’échange de loyautés politiques en Bolivie

« No pido plata para andar » : un dirigeant de la communauté Tierra Prometida signifait ainsi à ses « bases » qu’il n’exerçait pas sa fonction par intérêt pécuniaire et qu’en retour il était légitime à recevoir leur « appui ». C’est sur la dimension morale et politique du partage foncier, au sein d’un processus de réforme agraire, que je voudrais insister dans cette présentation. Je m’appuierai sur une recherche menée dans une communauté de « paysans sans terre » bolivienne (Tierra Prometida), fondée à la suite de la « prise » d’une propriété mise en vente par un « trafiquant de terre » et mobilisée depuis pour obtenir de l’Etat central un titre foncier et une personnalité juridique. Ce sont les deux buts ultimes de l’andar (cheminement) du dirigeant « au dehors » de la communauté (dans le monde de la politique). La « redistribution » de la terre se présente donc à la fois comme un transfert de droits fonciers entre une classe de possédants et une classe de travailleurs et comme un procès de distribution de droits et d’obligations au sein d’un corps politique. Le dirigeant paysan joue un rôle central dans le rapport redistributif qui s’instaure et se noue simultanément à l’échelle communale et nationale, rapport qui conditionne la transformation de la structure foncière à un échange de loyautés politiques parfois fluide et imprévisible.

Thivet Delphine,  Doctorante,Sociologie, IRIS – EHESS

Dynamiques et enjeux de la réforme agraire dans les forums sociaux 2000-2008

Inscrite dans une sociologie des mobilisations collectives, cette analyse décentrée sur des segments de luttes locales et globales, se propose d’explorer la diversité et l’originalité des revendications portées par les acteurs paysans et ruraux dans les forums sociaux – locaux, nationaux, régionaux, continentaux et internationaux – mais aussi « généralistes » et « thématiques » entre 2000 et 2008. C’est suite au tournant neoliberal opéré dans les années 1990 sous l’effet des programmes d’ajustements structurels impulsés par les grandes institutions financiers internationales (Banque Mondiale, Fonds Monétaire International, OMC…) que les sans-terre, journaliers, paysans familiaux, pêcheurs, peuples autochtones menacés, ruraux déplacés, femmes exploitées se sont en effet mobilisés sur la définition de leurs droits d’existence. Ils ont progressivement investi les forums sociaux, arguant de la centralité de leurs luttes dans les divers ateliers, plénières, séminaires, notamment autour des questions de domination et d’exploitation, dans les rapports de classe, de caste, de race et de genre. Autour du thème de la réforme agraire, les associations, organisations et collectifs structurent et amplifient le cadre interprétatif d’une negation globale des droits humains fondamentaux mais aussi de la disparition orchestrée des usages communautaires et droits collectifs – économiques, sociaux, culturels, cultuels, environnementaux – sur les terres. Dans un premier temps, nous montrerons comment ces acteurs ruraux hétérogènes ont accompli, à partir des années 1990, un travail de convergence et de transnationalisation des luttes, sur la base de diagnostics partagés en termes de privation, d’exclusion, de pauvreté, d’exploitation et de misère. Sont en particulier incriminés la privatisation des ressources et des terres, la concentration et l’internationalisation du capital foncier, le maintien de structures sociales agraires héritées de la colonisation et/ou recomposée de façon multiforme par le développement durable, le développement de l’ « agrobusiness », le brevetage du vivant, la destruction des communautés de vie, les migrations forcées – internes et internationales -, l’exploitation et la violence dans les champs, ou encore la criminalisation et la répression des mouvements sociaux et des luttes syndicales. En second lieu, nous mettrons au jour le double processus d’intrication des luttes paysannes, indigènes/autochtones, mais aussi d’articulation des luttes rurales et urbaines, réactivé dans les Forums sociaux en termes d’autonomie, de sécurité et de souveraineté alimentaire, gagnant progressivement l’ensemble des nations, des continents et des régions. Enfin, nous montrerons que l’expressivité des revendications dans ces tribunes relève d’une pluralité de luttes locales, singulières et diversifiées et que la « co-vision » de la Pacha Mama redessine, à partir de la définition de devoirs envers la « Terre commune », le contour des droits d’existence civils, politiques, économiques, sociaux, et culturels.

Tortolero Alejando, (Intervention à confirmer), Professeur, Histoire, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana de México, Iztapalapa, Mexique

La réforme agraire de la révolution mexicaine

(Sous réserve)Syndicaliste,  FRONT EZEQUIEL ZAMORA

Une réforme bolivarienne au Venezuela

Pablo F. Luna
Institut Hispanique
Université Paris Sorbonne
Pablo-Fernando.Luna@paris-sorbonne.fr

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Harvesting

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Mutiny

MUTINY AND MARITIME RADIALISM IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION: A GLOBAL SURVEY

CALL FOR PAPERS

We announce a conference to be held June 17-18, 2011 at the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam (NL). The conference will explore the transnational dimensions of mutiny and maritime radicalism during the great cycle of war and revolution beginning in the mid-1750s, progressing through the eras of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions, into the period of the South American Wars for Liberation, and concluding with the revolutionary movements of the 1830s-40s.

Our central theme will be mutiny – its causes, frequency, forms, patterns, and outcomes – as we chart, link, and compare maritime insurrections in the Atlantic and beyond, on warships, merchant and fishing vessels, on privateers, slavers, convict ships, troop transports, hulks, galleys, and other vessels plying their trade on the seas.  We will also concentrate on the mutineers themselves: their individual and collective biographies, social composition, self-organization, objectives, and ideas.

We also include unrest in port cities, sites of international exchange between maritime and landed forms of resistance.  Sailors did not live only on ships.  They spent significant amounts of time in port, sometimes connecting shipboard unrest and radical movements on land in personal, political, and social ways.

Our aim is to rediscover the age of revolution in its full geographic extent, and though our central focus will be on the Atlantic with its wars and revolutions, we take an expansive and flexible view of its limits, hoping for contributions on other maritime regions such as the Baltic, Caribbean, Mediterranean, and Black Seas, or the Indian, South Pacific, Arctic, and Antarctic Oceans, excluding none.

Questions covered in the papers might include:

1.  What was the chronology and geography of mutiny (broadly defined) in the age of revolution?
2.  What kinds of ships were involved and how many?
3.  What were the social profiles of the mutineers?
4.  How were the crews initially raised/mobilized?  How were they remunerated?
5.  What was the social composition of mutinous crews?
6.  What was the nature of self-organization among mutinous crews?
7.  What were the political dimensions of mutinies?  What were their demands?
8.  What were the connections of mutinies to other ships and fleets, to landed society, and to other social movements?

We expect the conference to result in an edited volume published by a major international press.

Proposals should include a title, 250 word abstract, and short CV.  
Please submit materials by email attachment to maritimeradicalism2011@gmail.com by September 1, 2010.

The Mutiny Conference Advisory Committee

Claire Anderson (Warwick University) clare.anderson@warwick.ac.uk
Emma Christopher (University of Sydney) emma.christopher@arts.usyd.edu.au  
Niklas Frykman (Claremont McKenna College) nfrykman@gmail.com
Lex Heerma van Voss (International Institute of Social History) lhv@iisg.nl  
Marcus Rediker (University of Pittsburgh) marcusrediker@yahoo.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski